View Full Version : A New Piece of the Autism Puzzle?


Lunacie
04-05-11, 04:24 PM
"Scientists have shown how a single protein may trigger autistic spectrum disorders by stopping effective communication between brain cells."

More here: Protein Found in Brain Cells May Be Key to Autism (http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/health-12759587)


related: Autists Have Problem With Self-Awareness (http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/health/8407857.stm)

Jr1985
04-05-11, 05:19 PM
Wow, hopefully this could eventually lead to some form of treatment that could make our lives a bit easier!

Sandy4957
04-05-11, 07:42 PM
Very interesting. Thanks.

fracturedstory
04-05-11, 08:01 PM
The researchers created mice which had a mutated form of Shank3, and found that these animals avoided social interactions with other mice.

They also engaged in repetitious and self-injurious grooming behaviour.

So that explains my self injurious behaviour when I groom myself.

Sorry. Yes it is very interesting.

Btw that very stereotyping caption to the pic 'autism affects boys more than girls' angers me.

Here is why:

http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/10/101004101332.htm

Lunacie
04-06-11, 08:45 AM
So that explains my self injurious behaviour when I groom myself.

Sorry. Yes it is very interesting.

Btw that very stereotyping caption to the pic 'autism affects boys more than girls' angers me.

Here is why:

http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/10/101004101332.htm

I totally agree! It should say "Boys are more often diagnosed" perhaps, but it isn't true that autism actually affects more boys than girls. We had a hard time getting my granddaughter diagnosed because of this mistaken belief, and because autism often looks different in girls (just as ADHD looks different girls than in boys). Our therapist finally talked with his supervisor who has a daughter just a couple of years older than my granddaughter. He described the traits and behaviors he had seen and we had described, and she told him that he could have been describing her daughter - and that she very firmly believed her daughter has autism - and asked if he doubted her assessment of her daughter.

Steep learning curve for him and for us, because previously we had believed that autists were boys who banged their heads on the floor and didn't talk to anyone and did really annoying repetitive behaviors. My granddaughter never banged her head on anything (although her sister did when she was 3), she tried so hard to communicate with us but had her own language until she was 4, and spent her time either lining up hot wheel cars over and over, or spinning in a circle in the middle of the floor for an hour at a time. Which was only annoying if we tried to play with the cars with her or tried to get her to stop spinning and come eat dinner or take a bath.

Anyway I thought the article was interesting, and I'm sure someone who doesn't know crap about what autism is really like added the photo and caption to spice up the web page.

fracturedstory
04-06-11, 07:53 PM
The captions on all those autism articles are things that anyone with a basic idea of autism know, like I think one said 'people with autism have problems socialising.' Oh wow, you have opened my eyes so much great wise caption.

Yeah I never tried to communicate with people. It's that I did or didn't want to. It just never occurred to me to do that. I had cars too. More Match Box than Hot Wheels and I had them all lined up on a shelf. I used to bang my head on brick walls. I never felt like I was getting anger out though. It felt good. I was pretty hyposensitive back then.

Lunacie
04-07-11, 08:45 AM
The captions on all those autism articles are things that anyone with a basic idea of autism know, like I think one said 'people with autism have problems socialising.' Oh wow, you have opened my eyes so much great wise caption.

Yeah I never tried to communicate with people. It's that I did or didn't want to. It just never occurred to me to do that. I had cars too. More Match Box than Hot Wheels and I had them all lined up on a shelf. I used to bang my head on brick walls. I never felt like I was getting anger out though. It felt good. I was pretty hyposensitive back then.

Yes, but this wasn't published where only people already knowledgable about autism would see it. It was published in the mainstream press where people who don't know much about autism might learn something. If we had known more about autism when my granddaughter was an infant, she could have been diagnosed and started getting all kinds of therapy sooner. We would have learned how to deal with the meltdowns and avoid some of them.

But the main point of the article was to say that research is being done and answers are being found, which could lead to even better therapies and treatment for children and adults with autism, eh?

My granddaughter had hundreds of Hot Wheels and Match Box cars, and she could remember them all. If we went to a store or a yard sale she could tell us whether she already had one of the cars or trucks or wanted to add one to her collection. Amazing recall.

She would line them up on the floor or coffee table, move them around and form a new pattern with them. She got very upset if someone would move one where she didn't want it to go. Once in awhile if we asked to play with her, she would give us one car to play with out of the half dozen she had out, but sometimes she would take it back immediately and sometimes she'd take it back after just a few minutes.

She was also hyposensitive, but didn't hurt herself. She came home from kindergarten one afternoon with a broken arm. The teacher, the aide, the school nurse, all knew she had hurt herself falling from the slide, but had no idea how badly. I wasn't sure so I gave her some tylenol and let her sleep till her mom got home from work so we could both go with her to the ER. She wasn't crying, she was like a blank slate, but she was holding onto that arm with the other hand.