View Full Version : DSM Changes for HF Asperger


Justtess
04-06-11, 10:19 PM
With the multitude of information swirling around my head.... I would really appreciate if someone could help me understand what does the changes basically mean and how does it affect those who were dx HF Asperger.

I get the impression there is much debate about the condition and the catagory would be included under Autism if it severely affects a person's ability to function in a normal unassisted setting. Does that mean people who can function most of the time or sometimes in a normal unassisted setting would just be treated as a 'personality disposition'?

DSM Changes Affect Asperger's Syndrome article (http://helpingpsychology.com/dsm-changes-affect-aspergers-syndrome)

fracturedstory
04-07-11, 06:33 AM
There is a severity scale.

http://www.dsm5.org/ProposedRevisions/Pages/proposedrevision.aspx?rid=94#

For those that don't fit it there is also social communication disorder. I can't find the link for it but I think most that aren't that impaired by AS will fit it. AS is not a label, it's a disorder and people should only be diagnosed to receive support and special services or to help them in some way. So I don't see the big deal in changing the name.

Asperger's is often overdiagnosed or misdiagnosed. I'm not saying it doesn't exist. I know it does and I talk to people with AS almost every day. The only person I get to talk about one of my special interests with has AS. But it's turning into a buzz diagnoses for doctors.

Dizfriz
04-07-11, 07:32 AM
The home page lists the different disorders and link to current progress.
http://www.dsm5.org/Pages/Default.aspx


You can find Social Communication Disorder under childhood disorders
or look here.

http://www.dsm5.org/ProposedRevisions/Pages/proposedrevision.aspx?rid=489

Dizfriz

Scooter77
04-08-11, 05:29 AM
Asperger's is often overdiagnosed or misdiagnosed. I'm not saying it doesn't exist. I know it does and I talk to people with AS almost every day. The only person I get to talk about one of my special interests with has AS. But it's turning into a buzz diagnoses for doctors.
Yes, but there's another side to that coin. Try being an adult female and getting dx'd!
There's plenty of 'experts' who still laugh at the mention of female ASD, I met some of them!

I wonder if the changes will help or hinder those of us who spent a lifetime learning how to successfully hide their sympoms, yet suffering hugely in secret?

Jr1985
04-08-11, 06:42 AM
Yes, but there's another side to that coin. Try being an adult female and getting dx'd!
There's plenty of 'experts' who still laugh at the mention of female ASD, I met some of them!

I wonder if the changes will help or hinder those of us who spent a lifetime learning how to successfully hide their sympoms, yet suffering hugely in secret?
Indeed. I seem to be so successful at hiding my difficulties that people have a hard time believing me when I tell them I have AS.

Jr1985
04-08-11, 06:47 AM
This study suggests that, although intelligence doesn't protect you from ADHD, it may enable you to compensate better for your deficits. None of the participants were diagnosed as children, probably because they were able to hide it so well. The coping strategies aren't as successful in adulthood, hence why they eventually got their diagnosis.

http://aadd.org.uk/libraryresources/highiqadults.pdf

"
Most of these high IQ adults were not evaluated for
ADHD until high school years or beyond. In some cases,
impairments were not noticed until the adult began university
studies or employment where he or she was challenged
by increased demands for EF. Most of those
evaluated reported that during elementary school years
they were able to function in ways that lived up to high
expectations for academic success that were held by their
parents, teachers, and themselves. It was only when they
moved into middle school or junior high where they had
to keep track of various homework assignments for many
different teachers, without anyone to help them to prioritize
and remember, that impairments of these high IQ
individuals became apparent."

ADHD and AS are somewhat related, so maybe the same thing applies to AS?

Scooter77
04-08-11, 07:17 AM
I'm ADHD and ASD and I was only dx'd in my 30s. It drives me mental that 'professionals' often say "Oh, you dont LOOK aspie...."
I would so love to respond......"Oh, you don't LOOK uneducated...." but even I know that would be rude.....how come it's not rude for them to judge me?

I would venture a suggestion that my weirdly-wired brain allows me faster processing of possibly unusual information, and slower processing of the normal bits.

But I do actually have a point....here it is......for me personally, I think ASD gives me the obsession and ADHD gives me the drive..
I'm not an advocate of either as a gift, but in my personal case, I think that possibly one offsets the other.
Meaning I'm fortunate for having both (now that they are recognised and treated) rather than one without the boundaries that the other enforces....

Hope that makes sense, and apologies if it doesnt!

fracturedstory
04-08-11, 09:16 PM
Try being an adult female and getting dx'd!


I am one of those.

Justtess
04-09-11, 12:15 AM
"
Most of these high IQ adults were not evaluated for
ADHD until high school years or beyond. In some cases,
impairments were not noticed until the adult began university
studies or employment where he or she was challenged
by increased demands for EF. Most of those
evaluated reported that during elementary school years
they were able to function in ways that lived up to high
expectations for academic success that were held by their
parents, teachers, and themselves. It was only when they
moved into middle school or junior high where they had
to keep track of various homework assignments for many
different teachers, without anyone to help them to prioritize
and remember, that impairments of these high IQ
individuals became apparent."

ADHD and AS are somewhat related, so maybe the same thing applies to AS?
I wondered about the same thing also. What was truely gifted, ADHD, or AS. I can't remember where I read it at the moment but I did read about high processing speed and pattern recognition to be more AS than ADHD.

Sometimes, my son will mimic other people's behavior without fully understanding the awkwardness of his timing or how ineffective it is. I'm not sure what catagory that would be in.

His conversations are mostly one way and he does not appear to be listening too long in reciprical conversation. Asperger?

roseblood
05-17-11, 03:49 AM
I can see how some people might lose a diagnosis under these criteria (mostly because you currently need just one kind of repetitive behaviour, and with these you need two) but surely a lot of people will gain one, as well? I'm on a waiting list and think I'd be more likely to be diagnosed with this new ASD designation than I would be with AS, because a broader range of symptoms are explicitly included. Excessive touching and smelling is actually one of my more problematic ASD behaviours right now (socially bizarre and has caused mild deformation and significant pain in my outer ears, which I rub with a thumb after licking it) and it's not covered by the DSM-IV at all.

For another example, I never struggled to read other people's nonverbal signals except for some problem distinguishing between serious and non-serious through to at least my mid-teens and a bit now, but I do even now have difficulty communicating certain things to others nonverbally and even people who know me well can't read my most basic body language correctly, such as whether I'm anxious or paying attention. My apparently reticent and innocent demeanor is largely caused by knowing that I can't get subtle or nuanced things across, so I don't try to. That manifestation is actually mentioned in these proposed criteria.