View Full Version : Overly Detailed Speech


addtention
04-29-11, 11:51 AM
Someone in my immediate family is always giving overly detailed speeches when just having a casual conversation.

You will talk to them about something and they just start telling you everything about the subject and won't shut up and talk and talk then get offended when you ask them to stop talking that you understand. They repeat and repeat and repeat everything they say over and over and over again. If you ask the person how many people were at say an event they pause for like 10 seconds and then you say just an approximate number and they will get defensive and say well well you didn't give me time to think. Then they will say their were 103 people and 1 left 15 minutes after the event started and so on just giving way to many details.

another sample of this is talking about buying milk they would check the ounces and describe all about which one is the best price and then proceed to tell you some random story about the history of milk or something half-related.

They talk and talk all the time with way more detail then needed. Their are many scenarios like this that happen all the time and cause great stress is this OCD or some kind of other anxiety disorder this person is over 30 and way overly organized. and Lastly they act like a human robot 24/7

tipoo
04-29-11, 07:50 PM
I don't know about stress or anxiety disorder, sounds like something thats simply an aspect of personality, in the absence of other symptoms.

My dad is like that, he'll take a good 15 minutes to share a story anyone else would finish in 2, and with my attention span of a few picoseconds it drives me up the wall.

Mr. Gerbz
05-10-11, 05:19 PM
Sounds very much like an autism spectrum disorder (think Asperger's, PDD-NOS, Classic Autism, etc).

I wonder though... How come you nor any others have looked in that direction yet if his symptoms are so disturbing? Or have you already done so and just didn't recognize him in it? And has he been diagnosed with anything else already?

ADD3r
05-19-11, 09:27 PM
My Mother use to do this a lot. I always struggle not to do the same and even have a hard time giving yes or no answers. For me it feels like Im trying to be precise because the NO isnt always a no when conditions are slightly different and yes I walk around with a ton of history on just about any subject. I had a childhood friend who did the same except for one big exception he made his facts up but I always knew lol

Grasshoppaa
05-19-11, 09:32 PM
Not trying to sound too harsh, but it sounds like they're just dumb. The reason I say that is that people who aren't very smart tend to think that other people are on the same level as them, hence the need for the detailed explanations, etc. Unfortunately, lack of intelligence isn't curable.

RedHairedWitch
05-19-11, 09:39 PM
My hunny does this, I call it Professor Mode.

Fortune
05-19-11, 10:00 PM
Not trying to sound too harsh, but it sounds like they're just dumb. The reason I say that is that people who aren't very smart tend to think that other people are on the same level as them, hence the need for the detailed explanations, etc. Unfortunately, lack of intelligence isn't curable.

I was tested at either gifted or genius IQ in the first grade and I am fairly certain I would still test as gifted now, and I do this all the time. It's kind of a trait of autistic spectrum disorders as said upthread - and I am autistic.

It's not a matter of intelligence, but what it actually is I'm having trouble putting into words right now. It has to do with being able to predict what someone else might or might not already know, I think.

The OP's family may not themselves be autistic or have autistic traits, but that they do this doesn't reflect on their intelligence.

Grasshoppaa
05-19-11, 10:24 PM
I was tested at either gifted or genius IQ in the first grade and I am fairly certain I would still test as gifted now, and I do this all the time. It's kind of a trait of autistic spectrum disorders as said upthread - and I am autistic.

It's not a matter of intelligence, but what it actually is I'm having trouble putting into words right now. It has to do with being able to predict what someone else might or might not already know, I think.

The OP's family may not themselves be autistic or have autistic traits, but that they do this doesn't reflect on their intelligence.

Yea, well you're obviously a different case than most people then. In case you didn't notice, I didn't get too specific in my explanation, but the general idea holds true. I agree that it doesn't necessarily reflect their intelligence, but intelligence and smarts are two different things, and it does reflect their smarts (in other words how they use their intelligence).

Now obviously these are generalizations that I used as a possible explanation for the behavior described by the OP, so they aren't necessarily true, so arguing against them is pointless.

Fortune
05-19-11, 10:37 PM
Yea, well you're obviously a different case than most people then. In case you didn't notice, I didn't get too specific in my explanation, but the general idea holds true. I agree that it doesn't necessarily reflect their intelligence, but intelligence and smarts are two different things, and it does reflect their smarts (in other words how they use their intelligence).

I am not a different case to autistic people who are as intelligent or more intelligent, nor to people who may not be autistic but may have these traits. Which is actually more of a social thing, not an overall intelligence or "smarts" thing. I am not certain of the distinction you're trying to draw here, especially as compared to what you initially posted.

Now obviously these are generalizations that I used as a possible explanation for the behavior described by the OP, so they aren't necessarily true, so arguing against them is pointless.My point was that you had just said this:

Not trying to sound too harsh, but it sounds like they're just dumb. The reason I say that is that people who aren't very smart tend to think that other people are on the same level as them, hence the need for the detailed explanations, etc. Unfortunately, lack of intelligence isn't curable. It's kind of backpedaly to say "They're not necessarily true, so there's no point to arguing." First, I wasn't arguing, but giving you information - perhaps with too many details. Second, it really does look like you were saying they lacked intelligence because you actually did say "lack of intelligence."

I can see you were making a generalization, but I often find that making generalizations doesn't render me immune to disagreement.

Incidentally, I do accept your clarification (even if I am unclear on the distinction you are trying to draw, or why it's necessary to draw it), I am simply explaining my response.

Grasshoppaa
05-19-11, 10:50 PM
I am not a different case to autistic people who are as intelligent or more intelligent, nor to people who may not be autistic but may have these traits. Which is actually more of a social thing, not an overall intelligence or "smarts" thing. I am not certain of the distinction you're trying to draw here, especially as compared to what you initially posted.

My point was that you had just said this:

It's kind of backpedaly to say "They're not necessarily true, so there's no point to arguing." First, I wasn't arguing, but giving you information - perhaps with too many details. Second, it really does look like you were saying they lacked intelligence because you actually did say "lack of intelligence."

I can see you were making a generalization, but I often find that making generalizations doesn't render me immune to disagreement.

Incidentally, I do accept your clarification (even if I am unclear on the distinction you are trying to draw, or why it's necessary to draw it), I am simply explaining my response.

You are correct. I did say in my previous post that I "didn't get too specific in my explanation", which was referring to my technically improper use of the word "intelligence". I know I said that they lacked intelligence, but I didn't mean for it to be taken so technically and literally. I should have used something else, such as "smarts", in place of the word "intelligence".

My apologies for any misunderstandings.

Fortune
05-19-11, 10:55 PM
You are correct. I did say in my previous post that I "didn't get too specific in my explanation", which was referring to my technically improper use of the word "intelligence". I know I said that they lacked intelligence, but I didn't mean for it to be taken so technically and literally. I should have used something else, such as "smarts", in place of the word "intelligence".

My apologies for any misunderstandings.

It's cool.

Literal and technical interpretations are another autistic thing... damnit.

addtention
06-10-11, 03:17 PM
Thank you for all the replys I never came back and checked the thread