View Full Version : Are most ASD clearly not ADHD?


mrsmith
05-07-11, 09:48 AM
Are most ASD individuals clearly not particularly ADHD?

In all category's of ASD?
(i am mostly thinking in terms of degree of functioning/intelligence).

Can you say that it is a minority (10%-30% that have ADHD), and that typical ASD is more opposite than ADHD, rather than ASD and ADHD beeing similar.

ampakine
05-07-11, 09:59 AM
No idea. All I know is that I was diagnosed with both high functioning autism and ADHD. The psychiatrist I was diagnosed by happens to specialise in autism and ADHD and he says that autism can cause the symptoms that are usually associated with ADHD. Notice how most people with autism like "stimming" so much that it becomes a compulsion? If the person didn't have autism that would be considered a symptom of OCD or ADHD. I don't know anyone else with HFA/ASD in real life but I recommend asking this question on http://www.wrongplanet.net

BTW why is this the only post in this forum? Do the threads get deleted regularly or something? If not its a bizarre coincidence that I wandered into this forum 5 minutes after you started this thread.

Lunacie
05-07-11, 10:34 AM
I've read that the new DSM version 5 is going to allow for both conditions to be diagnosed in one person, the DSM-IV said they were two separate disorders that could not be present in the same person. I've had my suspicions for a few years now, shared by quite a few other people, that ASD and ADHD are actually part of the same spectrum.

There are some who wonder if a person who has ADHD also has SPD (sensory processing disorder), speech disorder, maybe a learning disorder, and a socialization disorder as cormorbid is where we get the diagnosis of Autism or Asperger's.

I remember reading some information about what a small percentage of those dx with ADHD have Asperger's/ASD as well - but that a large percentage of those with Asperger's seem to have a cormorbid dx of ADHD - but I can't find that information at the moment.

fracturedstory
05-08-11, 10:05 PM
Different in functioning I think but intelligence, not so. Unless you take in that people with ASD are much more focused on details and ADHD just look at the overall picture. I get in many disputes with my mother because she sees the whole picture and I get stuck on the details. I'm a planner though, in fact, I'm an obsessive planner.

If you looked at ASD on its own you find someone having a very fixed interest, with a good long term memory and a very hard time relating to people, either lack of interest or just misunderstanding social rules. People that also lack an interest can fall into that category too.

I'm glad I'm already diagnosed because though I'm much more autistic in ways without my medication I'm a mess, basically. I will never get anything done. I will never grow. I will just be this very oversensitive and angry person stressed by all my symptoms.

I say if you show enough symptoms for both and are impaired by both then you have both. They could merge SPD, ADHD, and autism into one disorder and still treat everything then it'd be much better. Until then I will have my dual diagnosis's.

branjie
05-11-11, 09:32 PM
With my son, it's a bit blurry where the Asperger's ends and the ADHD begins. I do know however that the ADHD medication actually helps with the Asperger's symptoms, so I'm so glad that he has been diagnosed with ADHD as well. It's a shame that from what I know about Asperger's/Autism (which isn't a lot yet), most don't get medicated. Maybe a lot of them could benefit from something like the Strattera that my son takes. It keeps him calmer and more focused which helps with his social issues school work, and self care tasks which require short term memory.

StoicNate
05-11-11, 10:22 PM
I have all the symptoms of both conditions.
It's like asking a mutt dog what part/breed of him is he feeling like right now (Lol if animals could talk).

tinywiney
05-12-11, 01:21 AM
BTW why is this the only post in this forum? Do the threads get deleted regularly or something? If not its a bizarre coincidence that I wandered into this forum 5 minutes after you started this thread.

Go to the bottom of the page "Aspergers/Autism Spectrum/PDD," to where it says "display options." Click on the box "From The" to change the settings to show older threads.

Mr. Gerbz
05-13-11, 12:35 PM
My official diagnose is still Asperger's, and while I still recognize some things from it in myself (not recognizing certain emotions, getting too focussed on details, for example), it's very likely I also have ADD.
My sister has it too, so it's at least genetically viable. Not to mention my constant search for stimulation, depressive phases, sleep rhythm, and my loathing of structure even though I do realize it's useful for quite a lot of things.

Fortune
05-15-11, 02:19 PM
About 75% of people diagnosed with an ASD probably meet the criteria for ADHD. There are studies that demonstrate this.

mrsmith
05-24-11, 06:47 AM
About 75% of people diagnosed with an ASD probably meet the criteria for ADHD. There are studies that demonstrate this.

Some references please?

Proofreading for example is supposed to be a Autistic strength, but should be a problem for most people with ADHD.

(I also think ADHD is overrepresented among ASD people, and there are probably many with this combination who are poor at proofreading for example, but it doesn't mean that the majority of ASD are ADHD)

Fortune
05-24-11, 01:11 PM
Some references please?

Proofreading for example is supposed to be a Autistic strength, but should be a problem for most people with ADHD.

(I also think ADHD is overrepresented among ASD people, and there are probably many with this combination who are poor at proofreading for example, but it doesn't mean that the majority of ASD are ADHD)

Overrepresented?

I have ADHD and I have an autistic spectrum disorder, but I am actually fairly good with the proofreading. Maybe it's my hyperlexia.

The Complete Guide to Asperger's Syndrome by Tony Attwood says 75% of those diagnosed with AS meet the criteria, possibly based on the below studies.

Studies:

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17201617
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed?t...inary%20report (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed?term=Comorbidity%20of%20Asperger%20syndrome %3A%20a%20preliminary%20report)
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19515234

fracturedstory
05-24-11, 09:47 PM
I have autism and ADHD. It's not a matter of one disorder being stronger, though at times each disorder might be more impairing.
Without medication my life would be a mess but without routines and special interests my life would be in a mess too even while on medication.
My symptoms are pretty strong on both ends. And I've been diagnosed with both and I got the meds which work for me - that's really all I need.

rlmkelley
06-25-11, 02:48 PM
I'm new here but have done a lot of recent reading on Aspergers. A psychiatrist just diagnosed my son with Aspergers, although he has been treated for ADD for many years. He is currently on Vyvanse which helps. I'm not fully convinced that he is Aspergers. Anyhow, they (DSM) are merging Aspergers with autism. It sounds like there will be a grading system for how severe autism is, but the terms Aspergers and HFA will no longer be used.

Rachel

Fortune
06-26-11, 05:21 AM
HFA was never an official diagnostic term.

Jr1985
06-26-11, 10:45 AM
My psychiatrist said they used to think any ADHD-like symptoms appearing in people with AS were just part of the AS, so you couldn't be diagnosed with both. But now they realise it's "good clinical practice" to view them separately, as ADHD can be treated with medication, where AS cannot. Basically, having a dual diagnosis makes it easier to gain access to medication, as they are usually only prescribed for ADHD, not AS.

I guess ADHD is really executive dysfunction, so if you have AS+executive dysfunction, then you also have ADHD?

rlmkelley
06-28-11, 02:23 AM
I'm assuming that my son does have ADD b/c the Vyvanse clearly works for him. Other than that fact, I don't know how they would determine that my son's inattentiveness is due to ADD or AS.