View Full Version : Spelling issues, Dyslexia, ADHD and NVLD


mrsmith
05-24-11, 07:27 AM
Is it common to have spelling problems with ADHD, without it being considered to be Dyslexia?

What does this usually look like?

What is the relation to NVLD (I have the IQ profile of NVLD).

How common is poor spelling without Dyslexia? Is it usually poor education or not being strong in the language you are writing?

Reading about Dyslexia it seems to be a lot about problems reading, which is not the case for me (Except for attention). I have a slight tendency to missread, but nothing serious.

I don't mix letters, and I am quite sure my problems are not about connection spelling and phonetics.

My problems are:

1) "Wrong learning" - for example Asparger instead of Asperger :-) Or Teatcher instead of teacher, both in talking and writing (I should not that English is not my first language). Isn't this a bit the opposite of NVLD/ASD?

2) When I start to change something it is very difficult to get it consistent. I think it is just very difficult to put my attention on "proofreading" myself. It couldperhaps also be a problem with connecting what I want to say (The whole) with the words (details) - something that could come from my NVLD.

TygerSan
05-24-11, 08:21 AM
I have similar spelling issues (though I think I spell fairly well as a whole). . . your "mistakes" are phonetically consistent . . . I wonder if it could have more to do with what you say (part to whole) or perhaps even a visual memory issue (not "seeing" the words/letters) . . .

I could also see such spelling problems being attributed to an attention issue as well (just not paying attention to the details, and therefore not really noticing spelling errors).

mrsmith
05-24-11, 10:17 AM
>visual memory issue (not "seeing" the words/letters
I have it auditory also - like I used to pronounce the 'c' in character like the 'c' in Charles

>I could also see such spelling problems being attributed to an attention issue as >well (just not paying attention to the details, and therefore not really noticing >spelling errors).
I think it is attention to detail, but not at time of writing. I probably have some of that kind of errors as well.
Are most people able to find their own spelling errors by proofreading themselves?

>part to whole
I don't think you can attribute this to spelling errors withing a word (I am writing about NVLD focusing to details, which is a bit the opposite of lack of attention to details).

Werl
05-27-11, 09:16 PM
English is hard to learn as a second language because of the letter combos to make different sounds. You are spelling how it sounds.

P.S. you forgot the "e" at the end of "note".

insight needed
05-27-11, 10:04 PM
Mrs.Smith, I don't have an answer for you, but I wonder whether you have the same problems with spelling in your native language? If not, or not so much, I think it may just be that English is such a tough language to learn--letters (and letter combinations) can have so many different sounds. You can be spelling a word correctly from a phonetic perspective, and still have the word misspelled. I do think it is hard to catch your own spelling errors. Partly because if you think a word is spelled a certain way the first time, you will think it is spelled that way the second time you look at it also.

I know that I find it hard to proof-read what I write, when doing papers for a course. Partially, I think it is because I have to really work to slow myself down and pay attention to what I wrote. Since I "know" what it says, I tend to want to fly through it. For whatever reason, I do better if I put it away for awhile, and then re-read and edit another day.

mrsmith
05-28-11, 02:59 AM
>wonder whether you have the same problems with spelling in your native >language?
Its less - but I think its the nature of my problems both in my own and foreign languages (Compared to other non-native English speakers for example).

Asparger vs Asperger for example has nothing to do with phonetics or foreign/native language (Except for a vegetable being spelled like "Asparger").
It is of course difficult to be sure if I am really different.

>English is hard to learn as a second language because of the letter >combos >to make different sounds. You are spelling how it sounds.

What you describe is usually used to explain why there are many Dyslexic in English (native speakers), compared to some other languages.

I don't think that's my problem (As I tried to explain). The "character", example is a bit the opposite.

Werl
05-30-11, 07:25 PM
What is your first language? Many languages you pronounce all characters.