View Full Version : more adhd AFTER meditation?


ColdBlue
05-31-11, 08:10 PM
I read several articles claiming mindful meditation can decrease ADHD symptoms by 30+%.

I started meditating daily but the weird thing I found out is that AFTER my peaceful 15 minutes of meditation I develop, over 30 minutes or so, massive brain fog, which lasts up to two hours.

I normally get brain fog when I'm presented with new information I have to learn quickly (i.e. class), and I think it's some sort of weird defence mechanism.
That said I don't understand why I always get into that state after meditating.

One explanation may be that you get brain fog when your brain slows down (alpha waves), and meditating sure does that. But why do i get into that state AFTER and not during meditation? I'm afraid meditating is not going to be beneficial to me. Does anyone have a suggestions?

HighFunctioning
05-31-11, 10:06 PM
Which ADHD symptoms do these articles claim that meditation helps relieve?

Abi
05-31-11, 10:19 PM
Hahahahahaha. I love it.

Sorry Coldblue, no intention of minimising your problems, bro.

A hearty welcome to the forums :)

String
06-01-11, 12:57 PM
I don't have a full answer, either. I have some thoughts.

I think meditation can be really helpful. I've been trying to treat some of my ADHD symptoms with meditation and I don't think there's often an immediate good effect, at least not like there can be with medication. But I believe that regular meditation can bring overall well-being and calmness that can help with ADHD. In other words, maybe meditating right before a class won't help with that particular class, but maybe meditating regularly for a week or two actually will help with your classes.

Does this make sense?

There's also different types of meditation. Some mindfulness meditations seem to help more with immediate focus. Other mindfulness meditations seem to be more about understanding, being philosophical, a little dreamy.

I'm also thinking about physical exercise. I know that if I exercise right before mental work, I'm often a huge space cadet. This doesn't mean that exercise is bad for my brain. It just means that running might not be the best thing to do right before a test.

Let me know how things go and how you progress. I'm taking Ritalin, but trying to practice mindfulness meditation more often to help with ADHD. Barliman might chime in with better comments than mine. He seems to know a lot about mindfulness meditation.

ColdBlue
06-01-11, 07:22 PM
Which ADHD symptoms do these articles claim that meditation helps relieve?

Here you go. (http://www.huffingtonpost.com/alvaro-fernandez/study-meditation-against_b_103534.html)

Hahahahahaha. I love it.

Sorry Coldblue, no intention of minimising your problems, bro.

A hearty welcome to the forums

Don't worry, realising that our problems are funny is a great step forward. Not an easy one though ; )

I don't have a full answer, either. I have some thoughts.

I think meditation can be really helpful. I've been trying to treat some of my ADHD symptoms with meditation and I don't think there's often an immediate good effect, at least not like there can be with medication. But I believe that regular meditation can bring overall well-being and calmness that can help with ADHD. In other words, maybe meditating right before a class won't help with that particular class, but maybe meditating regularly for a week or two actually will help with your classes.

Does this make sense?

Absolutely. Check out my link, it seems that meditation works as a training system that lets your brain learn how to concentrate on a single task, without distractions.

How much of this can be realistically obtained is a mystery for me though.


There's also different types of meditation. Some mindfulness meditations seem to help more with immediate focus. Other mindfulness meditations seem to be more about understanding, being philosophical, a little dreamy.

I'm also thinking about physical exercise. I know that if I exercise right before mental work, I'm often a huge space cadet. This doesn't mean that exercise is bad for my brain. It just means that running might not be the best thing to do right before a test.

Yup, i get your point, and it's more or less why I'm continuing my meditation routine even if it messes me up for some time afterwards: i hope it will pay on the long run.

My only fear is that meditating will actually in some way increase my disposition to slow brain states, i.e. alpha waves. Which I think is one of the problems of ADHD in the first place.

Let me know how things go and how you progress. I'm taking Ritalin, but trying to practice mindfulness meditation more often to help with ADHD. Barliman might chime in with better comments than mine. He seems to know a lot about mindfulness meditation.
I sure will, this is a very interesting subject. Also because I'm deeply fascinated with eastern thought and practices, so the "spiritual" side of meditation appeals to me also.

Kunga Dorji
06-01-11, 10:54 PM
I read several articles claiming mindful meditation can decrease ADHD symptoms by 30+%.

I started meditating daily but the weird thing I found out is that AFTER my peaceful 15 minutes of meditation I develop, over 30 minutes or so, massive brain fog, which lasts up to two hours.

I normally get brain fog when I'm presented with new information I have to learn quickly (i.e. class), and I think it's some sort of weird defence mechanism.
That said I don't understand why I always get into that state after meditating.

One explanation may be that you get brain fog when your brain slows down (alpha waves), and meditating sure does that. But why do i get into that state AFTER and not during meditation? I'm afraid meditating is not going to be beneficial to me. Does anyone have a suggestions?


What posture are you in?
Posture is of critical importance in maintaining alertness.
I find head posture and neck posture are critical.
IE If I sit so that the centre of my shoulder joints and the centre of my hip joints is in a direct vertical line below my ears_ I focus exceedingly well.
If my head comes forwards- I become foggy.
Think about this- how many of us stoop forwards with our head forwards of our shoulders? ( I can tell you it is almost ALL of you- not me- not since I had the Atlas Profilax treatment and did some Pilates to correct the posture. Have a look at my blog- the detail you need is there.)
Mediation is training- in particular one of the critical things that you have to train in is the balance between dullness (fog) and excitation ( overstimulation)
ref The Attention Revolution B Alan Wallace.

Brain wave entrainment can help too.

Secondly- learning to use meditation to beat ADHD takes time and very well directed training.
It took me 10 weeks of 2 half hour sessions with 6 sessions of close supervision to achieve a useful effect.
At the start of that training I was on 50 mg dexamphetamine a day by that point I was down to 15mg/day.
6 weeks after the 8th training session ( 4 and 1/2 months after starting training) my dexamphetamine ran out and I have not bothered seeking any more.
I do not need it.

The bottom line is it takes time- it needs skilled and discriminating guidance as we need someone to coach us and keep our motivation up ( remember us ADDers have a problem with losing motivation and becoming discouraged) and to get us back on track when we start practicing incorrectly.
If you go by yourself- the chances of success are much less- I should know- because I tried doing it myself that way for years.

anonymouslyadd
06-01-11, 10:59 PM
Which ADHD symptoms do these articles claim that meditation helps relieve?

I meditate on a fairly frequent basis (about once a day and sometimes twice). If I feel a negative emotion like sadness, the meditation will wipe that away. If I'm really hyper or kinda like out of control, the meditation will work for that too. Sometimes, it can bring a sense of clarity to my mind (not frazzled with thoughts as it usually is).

Kunga Dorji
06-01-11, 11:05 PM
Which ADHD symptoms do these articles claim that meditation helps relieve?
Hi HighFunctioning,
have a look at this link:
http://www.addforums.com/forums/showthread.php?t=103524

This is a "quick and dirty" summary of the chapter on ADHD from The Clinical Handbook of Mindfulness. It covers most of the critical points.
I have just gone back and posted in the references.
The research in this area is currently exploding. I have also posted on that elsewhere in this subforum.

Abi
06-01-11, 11:36 PM
Barliman.

DUUUUUUUUUDE.

Don't you see the profundity of this find?

We have real, anecdotal evidence that mindful meditation EXACERBATES adhd!!!!!!!

(:

Kunga Dorji
06-02-11, 05:59 AM
Barliman.

DUUUUUUUUUDE.

Don't you see the profundity of this find?

We have real, anecdotal evidence that mindful meditation EXACERBATES adhd!!!!!!!

(:

No- what we may well have is real anecdotal evidence that ADHD people are easily discouraged and give up at the first challenge- especially if they are not properly supervised. If you want to investigate "single case methodology" you have to look closely, not take a broad brush approach. You will note I started my approach by asking questions. Try it- it yields pleasing results.

Follow the links I left above- there is enough evidence to give any of us the horrors if we tried to look up each paper and plough through it.

If you look about you will also find people who have done poorly supervised Vipassana retreats and ended up with a psychotic break as a result.

Give me enough time and I will have a series of my own- I had a VERY pleasing day at work today- and ALL down to the mindfulness and the great results I can see from it - in the people who take it up and run with it.

Remember - all I am saying is- open your mind and try something that is simple to do, evidence based, and very low cost (unless you want the deluxe cushion).

Once you start doing it and getting positive results- it is hard to stop.
It is actually the cheapest and safest approach you can find- you only have to have the guts and the intellectual flexibility to give it a PROPER try (not a half baked one).

Look down at my sig- are you "getting busy on the proof"?

String
06-02-11, 03:15 PM
I'm going through Mindfulness for Dummies right now. It's a great book. I've also been reading some Kabat-Zinn stuff. I have a few recordings of his for guided meditations.

The reason I've been learning more about mindfulness, besides coming across a number of Barliman's posts on addforums, is because someone taught me a few meditation techniques when I was 16. I've used them pretty regularly throughout my life. I was diagnosed with ADHD at the age of 42 and have realized that the meditation, along with lots of notes and mind maps and weird reminders, has been one of the ways I've sometimes stayed mentally healthy even though I'm genetically inclined to have some pronounced ADHD symptoms.

During some of the most healthy periods in my life, I would frequently pause and pay attention to each of my five senses. I would do this several times a day. I didn't know I was practicing something called mindfulness. I didn't even know I had ADHD. (I just thought that I was partly insane and I didn't want anyone to know about it.)

I've had brief periods of pleasant lucidity in my life without medication. I think physical exercise and diet help. I'm starting to believe that mindfulness can help even more.

I was trying to follow some guided meditation a couple of weeks ago. The first time felt like a total failure. I've been going through some hard things in my life and my ADHD symptoms have been really bad, making it hard to meditate. The second time I followed this guided meditation felt like an amazing success, but if I remember right, I was pretty darn lazy and foggy after this experience. Is this anecdotal evidence that mindfulness is bad for ADHD? Hardly. It might just mean that I exercised my brain. Just like muscles get tired after exercise, our brain can also get tired.

I'm glad to be learning more about mindfulness and how it relates to ADHD.

Kunga Dorji
06-02-11, 06:06 PM
I'm going through Mindfulness for Dummies right now. It's a great book. I've also been reading some Kabat-Zinn stuff. I have a few recordings of his for guided meditations.

The reason I've been learning more about mindfulness, besides coming across a number of Barliman's posts on addforums, is because someone taught me a few meditation techniques when I was 16. I've used them pretty regularly throughout my life. I was diagnosed with ADHD at the age of 42 and have realized that the meditation, along with lots of notes and mind maps and weird reminders, has been one of the ways I've sometimes stayed mentally healthy even though I'm genetically inclined to have some pronounced ADHD symptoms.

During some of the most healthy periods in my life, I would frequently pause and pay attention to each of my five senses. I would do this several times a day. I didn't know I was practicing something called mindfulness. I didn't even know I had ADHD. (I just thought that I was partly insane and I didn't want anyone to know about it.)

I've had brief periods of pleasant lucidity in my life without medication. I think physical exercise and diet help. I'm starting to believe that mindfulness can help even more.

I was trying to follow some guided meditation a couple of weeks ago. The first time felt like a total failure. I've been going through some hard things in my life and my ADHD symptoms have been really bad, making it hard to meditate. The second time I followed this guided meditation felt like an amazing success, but if I remember right, I was pretty darn lazy and foggy after this experience. Is this anecdotal evidence that mindfulness is bad for ADHD? Hardly. It might just mean that I exercised my brain. Just like muscles get tired after exercise, our brain can also get tired.

I'm glad to be learning more about mindfulness and how it relates to ADHD.

Hi String- what was your posture when meditating?- vertically upright or a little slumped forwards?
I find just a few centimetres of head position makes an enormous difference in terms of the outcome.

Many of us have poor posture and find proper meditation posture really hard.

I found when I had that problem that doing it lying down with my back supported with a 2cm thick yoga mat and my head hanging off the end onto the carpet so that my neck did not lean forwards at all really helped.
I am sure that is a cerebral blood flow issue.

PM me if you want :)


Equally I always start with some targeted progressive muscle relaxation and a little pranayama ( special breath exercises) to kick off into the right state.
Duration is important

HighFunctioning
06-02-11, 08:43 PM
Here you go. (http://www.huffingtonpost.com/alvaro-fernandez/study-meditation-against_b_103534.html)


On neurocognitive test performance, significant improvements were found on the measure of attentional conflict and on several other neuropsychological tests (i.e., Stroop color-word test and Trails A and B) but not for measures of working memory.

Could the improvements be explained by a reduction in impulsiveness? The working memory tests are associated with the inattentive symptoms, just as the brain fog is. Impulsiveness is probably not the only factor resulting in a poor outcome concerning the stroop attentional conflict test, but I would think that it is significant enough that the scores would improve in the absence of impulsiveness, changing nothing else about the individual being tested. But that is just a speculation on my part.

I'm not saying that meditation doesn't or can't improve what you're expecting it to improve. I'm only looking at this from the perspective of the study that you referenced and I'm questioning whether or not the results mirror your expectations.

HighFunctioning
06-02-11, 09:31 PM
Hi HighFunctioning,
have a look at this link:
http://www.addforums.com/forums/showthread.php?t=103524


Thank you for posting this. It looks like I have a lot of reading to do! :eek:

Kunga Dorji
06-03-11, 04:42 AM
Thank you for posting this. It looks like I have a lot of reading to do! :eek:


It's not a nice thing to do to an ADHD person, I'm afraid.
I really am trying to be helpful though:rolleyes:

Kunga Dorji
06-03-11, 04:43 AM
Hi String- what was your posture when meditating?- vertically upright or a little slumped forwards?
I find just a few centimetres of head position makes an enormous difference in terms of the outcome.

Many of us have poor posture and find proper meditation posture really hard.

I found when I had that problem that doing it lying down with my back supported with a 2cm thick yoga mat and my head hanging off the end onto the carpet so that my neck did not lean forwards at all really helped.
I am sure that is a cerebral blood flow issue.

PM me if you want :)


Equally I always start with some targeted progressive muscle relaxation and a little pranayama ( special breath exercises) to kick off into the right state.
Duration is important


re duration-- if it is making you drowsy-- just do it for 5 minutes. Doing small sessions at first is a well accepted technique. Alternatively walking meditation works well.

ColdBlue
06-03-11, 11:41 AM
re duration-- if it is making you drowsy-- just do it for 5 minutes. Doing small sessions at first is a well accepted technique. Alternatively walking meditation works well.

Wow, so much stuff in this thread, thanks for your very informative comments.
I don't think duration is the problem, because I get brain fog AFTER I finish, so probably doing 5 minutes or 15 won't change much.

Regarding drowsyness: usually I have to take a power nap (15m) before meditating, because my only spare time to meditate is when I get back from work, and I'm pretty tired. Do you get drowsy too if you meditate when tired?

I'll try the 5min approach though, and today i bought a small mat to try out your posture suggestions. I'll keep you updated ; )

String
06-03-11, 12:50 PM
I've been trying to have shorter, more frequent meditations. I'll pay better attention to posture.

ColdBlue
06-03-11, 01:23 PM
Update: I've tried meditating lying down, with my head on a slightly lower level than the rest of my body.
Unofrtunately, I still get spacey-foggy in the minutes following the end of my meditation, so I'm pretty sure it's not a blood flow problem.

Bummer. My only concern would be understanding if I should continue doing this or not from a therapeutic/medical point of view. Unfortunately I don't know how many adhd doctors are expert on meditation and the like.

String
06-03-11, 02:45 PM
Update: I've tried meditating lying down, with my head on a slightly lower level than the rest of my body.
Unofrtunately, I still get spacey-foggy in the minutes following the end of my meditation, so I'm pretty sure it's not a blood flow problem.

Bummer. My only concern would be understanding if I should continue doing this or not from a therapeutic/medical point of view. Unfortunately I don't know how many adhd doctors are expert on meditation and the like.

Are you listening to guided meditations? Mindfulness? How long are you meditating?

Maybe you can try some seated meditations. I'm glad you're posting. I want to learn all I can, too, and Barliman hasn't yet written his Mindfulness for ADHD program. :)

Kunga Dorji
06-04-11, 08:47 AM
Are you listening to guided meditations? Mindfulness? How long are you meditating?

Maybe you can try some seated meditations. I'm glad you're posting. I want to learn all I can, too, and Barliman hasn't yet written his Mindfulness for ADHD program. :)

Believe me- I am working on it.
Every day, every time I try to explain it to a person I get a little closer.

I want it to be maximally effective when I launch in to it.

Kunga Dorji
06-04-11, 08:49 AM
Wow, so much stuff in this thread, thanks for your very informative comments.
I don't think duration is the problem, because I get brain fog AFTER I finish, so probably doing 5 minutes or 15 won't change much.

Regarding drowsyness: usually I have to take a power nap (15m) before meditating, because my only spare time to meditate is when I get back from work, and I'm pretty tired. Do you get drowsy too if you meditate when tired?

I'll try the 5min approach though, and today i bought a small mat to try out your posture suggestions. I'll keep you updated ; )


Hang in there- I am in frequent communication with the originator of MiCBT, and we are brainstorming as hard as we can go just now.

Kunga Dorji
06-04-11, 08:50 AM
Have a look at this link. This guy makes some very interesting comments about "cog fog".He is actually talking about the neck problem that was treated in me:
http://uprightdoctor.wordpress.com/2011/04/18/spondylosis-stenosis-cog-fog-and-dementia/

Acccording to a study done by Rutger’s University, vertebral venous hypertension is one of the most overlooked causes of ischemia of the arterial blood supply to the cord. The arterial blood supply to the cervical cord comes from the vertebral arteries. In this regard, the vertebral arteries also supply the lower inner lobes of the brain, thalamus, hypothalmaus, brainstem and cerebellum.
Please note that the reticular activating formation, in the brainstem, is the key part of the brain responsible for maintaining and regulating alertness.

I would argue that the alertness problem is a discrete issue, and only partially overlaps the issue of unstable attention.

ColdBlue
06-04-11, 10:18 AM
Hang in there- I am in frequent communication with the originator of MiCBT, and we are brainstorming as hard as we can go just now.

What's MiCBT?

Are you listening to guided meditations? Mindfulness? How long are you meditating?

Maybe you can try some seated meditations. I'm glad you're posting. I want to learn all I can, too, and Barliman hasn't yet written his Mindfulness for ADHD program. :)

No, I'm not a fan of guided meditations.
I'm enganging in typical mindfulness meditations: focus on breathing, counting each breath, and every time a thought emerges I detach from it, and "observe" it until it vanishes.
I tried seated meditations, and also walking meditations.

When I meditate walking, I concentrate on my footsteps or my breaths, following the thought process I described above. Some 10 minutes after I start my brain starts generating less thoughts and I get into a relaxed mental state.

But when this happens, be it walking, seated or lying down, I get drowsy and spacey. While walking I had to stop concentrating on mindfulness because I was getting really sleepy and heavy brain fog.

As you said, I do get into this state also after I exercise or do sports.

By the way, googling around I found that feeling spacey after meditation is quite a common problem, and one that may not be exclusively related to ADHD.

For example: link (http://diydharma.org/blog/meditation-side-effects)

Kunga Dorji
06-04-11, 06:34 PM
What's MiCBT?



No, I'm not a fan of guided meditations.
I'm enganging in typical mindfulness meditations: focus on breathing, counting each breath, and every time a thought emerges I detach from it, and "observe" it until it vanishes.
I tried seated meditations, and also walking meditations.

When I meditate walking, I concentrate on my footsteps or my breaths, following the thought process I described above. Some 10 minutes after I start my brain starts generating less thoughts and I get into a relaxed mental state.

But when this happens, be it walking, seated or lying down, I get drowsy and spacey. While walking I had to stop concentrating on mindfulness because I was getting really sleepy and heavy brain fog.

As you said, I do get into this state also after I exercise or do sports.

By the way, googling around I found that feeling spacey after meditation is quite a common problem, and one that may not be exclusively related to ADHD.

For example: link (http://diydharma.org/blog/meditation-side-effects)

Fogginess associated with meditation is one of the recognised barriers that we have to learn how to overcome.

It is possible to get too relaxed and under breathe- so a few deep breaths and a quick stretch to restore posture and lose any discomfort can work.

If it is a regular problem go back to breath counting ( sets of 7 breaths then back to zero usually works well), but only give yourself "permission" to do these stretching or breathing maneuvers at the end of a set of 7 breaths.

Re intrusive random thoughts:
What has been suggested to me is each time a thought arises simply notice that you have been thinking, note that "it is just a thought " then gently detach from the thought and deliberately place your attention back on the breath.
The step of wilfully diverting the attention to the breath is very important for this particular technique.
Both noting the arising thought, and firstly not following it, but secondly wilfully bringing the attention back to the breath activate the attention stabilising area in the anterior cingulate cyrus. With time this induces neuroplastic changes increasing the wiring in the attention stabilising part of the anterior cingulate.

MiCBT= Mindfulness Integrated CBT- the technique that fixed all my ADHD symptoms.
see
http://mindfulness.net.au (http://mindfulness.net.au/)

Conman
06-04-11, 06:49 PM
depends how you meditate. do you sit there doing nothing in peace? do you try to focus on nothingness? do you do zazen? if you do the latter 2 i mention, the brain fog may be occuring infrequently due to a new experience. if you do it more often, the brain fog may settle down and disappear, in which case i recommend doing it when you dont have anything to do afterwards. if brain fog persists, well no meditation for you!

ColdBlue
06-05-11, 12:58 PM
Fogginess associated with meditation is one of the recognised barriers that we have to learn how to overcome.

It is possible to get too relaxed and under breathe- so a few deep breaths and a quick stretch to restore posture and lose any discomfort can work.

If it is a regular problem go back to breath counting ( sets of 7 breaths then back to zero usually works well), but only give yourself "permission" to do these stretching or breathing maneuvers at the end of a set of 7 breaths.


I'll try this. But I don't think it's a respiration problem, because I tried walking meditation and I'm sure I was breathing enough, I wasn't forcing any breath pattern but just going with my sensations and needs.

After 15 minutes I started walking-meditating I got really spacey and sleepy.


Re intrusive random thoughts:
What has been suggested to me is each time a thought arises simply notice that you have been thinking, note that "it is just a thought " then gently detach from the thought and deliberately place your attention back on the breath.This is exactly what I'm doing. I don't even find it too hard to focus on my breaths after I'm a bit into the meditation, I can concentrate pretty well.
The problem is the two hour mental dullness that arises after the meditation session.

The step of wilfully diverting the attention to the breath is very important for this particular technique.
Both noting the arising thought, and firstly not following it, but secondly wilfully bringing the attention back to the breath activate the attention stabilising area in the anterior cingulate cyrus. With time this induces neuroplastic changes increasing the wiring in the attention stabilising part of the anterior cingulate.

MiCBT= Mindfulness Integrated CBT- the technique that fixed all my ADHD symptoms.
see
http://mindfulness.net.au (http://mindfulness.net.au/)

I'll take a look, thanks ; )

Kunga Dorji
06-07-11, 05:50 AM
depends how you meditate. do you sit there doing nothing in peace? do you try to focus on nothingness? do you do zazen? if you do the latter 2 i mention, the brain fog may be occuring infrequently due to a new experience. if you do it more often, the brain fog may settle down and disappear, in which case i recommend doing it when you dont have anything to do afterwards. if brain fog persists, well no meditation for you!

Zazen is hard core- not for beginners. Even now I find it hard to wrap my head around that challenge.
Vipassana is gentler and subtler.

Kunga Dorji
06-07-11, 05:56 AM
I'll try this. But I don't think it's a respiration problem, because I tried walking meditation and I'm sure I was breathing enough, I wasn't forcing any breath pattern but just going with my sensations and needs.

After 15 minutes I started walking-meditating I got really spacey and sleepy.

This is exactly what I'm doing. I don't even find it too hard to focus on my breaths after I'm a bit into the meditation, I can concentrate pretty well.
The problem is the two hour mental dullness that arises after the meditation session.

I'll take a look, thanks ; )

Posture is everything. Look at the guy in this video at the time 1:01
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=R6miAPuNYj8

That is the posture we want.

That posture kills all the fogginess.

It is worth working towards.

It is not easy.

That is why I had the Atlas Profilax treatment, because that is now the most comfortable posture for me.

This link is a more current review of the same problem:
http://uprightdoctor.wordpress.com/2011/04/18/spondylosis-stenosis-cog-fog-and-dementia/

Conman
06-07-11, 12:04 PM
Zazen is hard core- not for beginners. Even now I find it hard to wrap my head around that challenge.
Vipassana is gentler and subtler.


eh. everybody's different. that's the one aspect i'm good at in buddhism, the zazen, i found my way to stop the mental monkey swinging around

peanutbutter
06-19-11, 11:42 AM
I also own a copy of mindfulness meditation and I am sort of confused why you experience brain fog after meditation. For me I took it after realizing I was going through a crisis and so I have already been able to control my breakdowns every since. I hope mindfulness meditation will be beneficial to you on your next classes. Good luck!