View Full Version : Neurofeedback SUCCESS!!


Elainehix
06-10-11, 08:54 PM
Ok, perhaps I should tell you a little history on my son. In preschool his teachers told us he was "stubborn" and had issues with transitions. By kindergarten, the teacher had what we called "the intervention" where they pretty much demanded we take our strong willed, "perseverent child", who did not like to be touched and put everything in his mouth, to see a psychologist for evaluation. He was completing work, but seemed "in a world of his own", and did not seem to recognize adult authority. The psychologist said she felt he had ADHD, special education teacher strongly disavowed this, but it was the end of the school year and we were moving anyway. I read Dr. Hallowell's book, Delivered from Distraction, and started giving Alex high dose, high % EPA fish oil per his book. His tactile defensiveness improved markedly. He also started increasing eye contact, though I wouldn't say that it was extreme prior to this. At the end of the summer, we had OT for sensory and coordination issues and took handwriting without tears, which helped some.

During first grade I bit the bullet and started Daytrana patch and dealt with horrible rebound effects even when we would try to ease him off with a small dose of stimulants. The omegas, multiviatmins, and now melatonin were our nightly ritual. We did INTERACTIVE METRONOME during this 1st grade year, his coordination improved markely and attention some, but the effect was not as dramatic with attention. So the next two years involved lots of med switching from DAYTRANA to CONCERTA to STRATTERA (OMG, the worst) to WELLBUTRIN to ADDERALL, to both wellbutrin and adderall. WE spoke with our developmental pediatrician re; the possiblilty of ASD vs ADD and basically , she said teh treatment would not differ. It would be multidisciplinary and symptomatic. This last year we went organic then for the last 6 months, he has been gluten and caseine free, honestly not much difference noted from just going organic, so we may stop this. I guess I just want parents to know that I understand where you are coming from, and it was really because my work added an HSA to their insurance plan that I decided to give neurofeedback a try since it wouldn't cost me anything and my husband had a month off before he is going back to grad school, hence we had the money and the time.

We live in Knoxville, TN, and one of the pioneers in qEEG led neurofeedback was associated with our state university here. His name was Joel Lubar, Phd. (please google him, he is well published and you will learn alot about this treatment and it's effect on ADD/ ADHD. ) There is also another PhD that is currenty at the University of Tennessee, Knoxville, who was trained by Lubar and has carried on his research by trying to target specific areas of the brain involved in volitional attention, Rex Cannon. He practices in Knoxville still and I thought I had nothing to lose and emailed him. He promptly emailed us back and set us a preliminary interview to discuss treatment. Basically, they did baseline tests of attention and intelligence as well as baseline qEEG, as he treats all clients as subjects and makes you sign consents you may be included in future research. He is also very well published, you may google him also.

On the internet, I read to expect anywhere from 25-50 sessions to see results and Dr Cannon stated because of Loreta (software which has allowed 3d mapping of the brain re: which frequency of EEG waves are present where) that he can pinpoint specific areas to treat therefore less treatments are necessary. He stated as few as 5 to probably no more than 15 depending on Alex's response. On Alex's baseline (drugfree x 48 hours) qEEG, he noted he had very elevated high frequency beta waved in an area of the brain associated with anxiety, whic he said that Adderall may in fact aggravate, hmmmmm.... Five treatments in we stopped Adderral but continued supplements, It was rough for 3 days and a weekend but we continued the neurofeedback daily on weekdays. TODAY MY SON HAD A NORMAL QEEG and HE WROTE 25 repetitive sentences in his room by himself without prodding in 10 minutes AND they were neat. THIS WOULD NEVER EVER EVER EVER have happened. This child has to be redirected after each problem on every task. EVEN ON MEDS. I have spent numerous hours by his side prodding him on, frustrated because I have a gifted child who is so distracted he would never be able to achieve anything in life.

I feel hopeful tonight. If it is not a cure, it is VAST improvement. I will continue to keep you posted and will post the difference between his pretest and posttest scores (supposedly IQ score increase dramatically after treatment) I would encourage any family to research this treatment modality. Research has been positive and the effects are PERMANENT, bye bye rebound. I want my son to be healthy and happy, not constantly changing because of his medication regimen. Please check out your provider, very few are certified (only 3 in the state of TN) I will keep you updated......
Elaine, RN, CRNA, MSN mom of DS, ALEX age 9:):):):)

bluesky
06-16-11, 01:23 PM
Elaine,

Thanks for sharing your success story with us. You''re son is lucky to have such diligent parents. :)

I would love to try neurfeedback for my children, but cost is a real problem for us. I don't think our insurance won't pay for dime of it, but they will pay for medications. The rebound effect of medication is such a problem, particularly with children, and is one of the reasons I am interested in neurofeedback.

Good luck and continued success!

Dizfriz
06-16-11, 04:52 PM
Elaine,


I would love to try neurfeedback for my children, but cost is a real problem for us. I don't think our insurance won't pay for dime of it, but they will pay for medications. T


Before you spend a lot of money, you might research the forum for posts on neurofeedback.

Basically, neurofeedback has some real promise but is not a validated treatment for ADHD. It seems to work for some but not for others. This is why it is generally in the "promising but needs more research" category.

This is why most insurances will not pay for it.

My thoughts are that if you can easily afford it might work for you. If not, caution is advised.

Right now, the only two treatments validated for ADHD children is medication and ADHD specific behavior management. There are some promising ones under study including neurofeedback but they are not yet ready to be considered as validated treatments.


Good luck.

mjames
08-08-12, 06:20 PM
First, because it is a permanent fix, it is not likely to be embraced by the medical community any time soon. Your doctor receives quite a handsome kickback for prescribing ADHD medication.
Second, Insurance doesnt pay for it because the cost outweighs the any possible benefit to them. Insurance pays pennies for your medication (ever wonder the cost under insurance for the generic is so much more than the brand name Adderol?). They would have to pay thousands for a treatment and it wouldnt save them enough in the long run... Since most people have the same insurance policy for an average of only 3-4 years, Insurance very, very rarely covers things that only have longer term cost benefits.

SpaceCadet84
08-09-12, 08:55 PM
For anyone interested in learning more about neurofeedback for ADD, here's a link to a recent scientific literature review:

http://thedubinclinic.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/11/what-is-neurofeedback.pdf

Drewbacca
08-10-12, 02:42 AM
First, because it is a permanent fix, it is not likely to be embraced by the medical community any time soon. Your doctor receives quite a handsome kickback for prescribing ADHD medication.

I'm so tired of conspiracy theories...
If you have evidence that it a) works and b) that doctors are intentionally failing to use it, then by all means share with the class.

ConcertaParent
08-10-12, 10:17 AM
Thanks for the useful link. I've also been reading a neurofeedback book that's available online -
Introduction to Quantitative EEG and Neurofeedback: Advanced Theory and Applications (http://www.brainmusictreatment.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/12/NF-introduction-BMT-chapter.pdf).
My favourite part so far is chapter 14 on "QEEG and neurofeedback for assessment and effective intervention with ADHD".
For anyone interested in learning more about neurofeedback for ADD, here's a link to a recent scientific literature review:
http://thedubinclinic.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/11/what-is-neurofeedback.pdf