View Full Version : Body Building


MMetelli13
06-28-11, 12:31 AM
I am going back to my local gym tomorrow morning and I intend to get my body back in shape (if I am going to be able to join the military within 2 years, I'll have to). However, despite my research online, I seem to have problems finding out a good plan that fits me (and pushups, but that can change with training).

My question: When picking out a body-training plan, what are some good plan-making tips that I can stick to easily?

String
06-28-11, 12:14 PM
A lot of people love complex workout plans. Sometimes these plans are so complex that you need personal trainers, huge books and charts, or big sets of DVDs to keep track of them. None of that ever worked for me.

This is what has worked for me:

Pyramid Workout (based on a Marine Corps workout)

1 Pull Ups
2 Push Ups
3 Crunches
30 Second Break

2 Pull Ups
4 Push Ups
6 Crunches
30 Second Break

3 Pull Ups
6 Push Ups
9 Crunches
30 Second Break

Keep going until you completely max out (usually on the pull up, keeping decent form) and then work your way all the way back down. If you maxed out on 4 pull ups, then do 3 pull ups, 6 push ups, and 9 crunches, 2 pull ups...

Why is this a good work out? It has a built in warm up and cool down. You see results quickly. (When I started, I was maxing out at 3 pull ups. I was able to add 1 or two pull up reps every week. I was able to do a set of 20 pull ups within less than a year.) It's not a bad total body workout. It's hard to injure yourself. You can change the type of push ups (hands close, far apart), change the types of pull ups (curl ups, wide, close) or add other exercises into the mix (dips, pistols, v ups, curls, whatever equipment is available). It's also not terribly complex and doesn't require a bunch of equipment or a personal trainer.

You can look up variations of Marine Corps pyramid workouts on Google. Have fun. Do the work outs three or four times a week. And drink a light protein shake after your work outs and maybe before you go to bed. Eat healthy food.

(These are all just suggestions. This workout worked really, really well for me, but it might not work for you.)

p.s. One more cool thing, when you start maxing out around 10 pull ups or more, your workout gets pretty long and you can start reporting huge counts to your friends, like "I just did 150 pull ups, 300 push ups, and 450 crunches!"

anonymouslyadd
06-28-11, 02:19 PM
I am going back to my local gym tomorrow morning and I intend to get my body back in shape (if I am going to be able to join the military within 2 years, I'll have to). However, despite my research online, I seem to have problems finding out a good plan that fits me (and pushups, but that can change with training).

My question: When picking out a body-training plan, what are some good plan-making tips that I can stick to easily?

It will always be a challenge for us to stick to things. I won't recommend a plan to build strength or lose weight. However, I strongly recommend when you do workout, you do it at the same times and on the same days. I've done that with my Physical Therapy and have been fairly successful with getting myself to do it.

What ever you do start real slow and build up. Good luck.

tipoo
06-28-11, 02:36 PM
My question: When picking out a body-training plan, what are some good plan-making tips that I can stick to easily?

Always keep in mind: Less time, but harder. Its better to do say 10 reps of something before muscle fatigue than 40. If you can do more than 12-15, add 5 pounds or whatever the smallest weight increment is.

Second, and what many people forget, is that if you want to put on visible muscle, you have to eat. If you loose more calories in a day than you consume, you'll end up smaller. I recommend whey protein powder in a drink 45 minutes before you start.

Third, don't plateau. I was fairly aggressive this summer and committed myself to adding 5 pounds every second week, I did have to dial down some weeks but now I can chest press 200 pounds 10 times x 2 sets. If you find a weight that fatigues your muscles, but never increase it for weeks, you will never get stronger, as your body will never have to exert itself.


Basic stuff, but you'll see good results if you stick to it.

anonymouslyadd
06-28-11, 02:39 PM
I recommend whey protein powder in a drink 45 minutes before you start.

Is this a secret Tippoo trick?;) The school of thought in my experience is always protein after the workout to aid with recovery.

tipoo
06-28-11, 02:53 PM
Is this a secret Tippoo trick?;) The school of thought in my experience is always protein after the workout to aid with recovery.

The Tipoo school of thought is that your muscles will need to burn something while you are working out as well...Its why some athletes carb load before a race, but carbs aren't ideal for muscle growth. Anecdotally, I find I can do better if I do take the protein before.

True, your muscles grow by repairing the damage done after the workout, but it takes time to digest even whey, and I think most studies showed they consumed the most protein 20-40 minutes after the workout. So you could eat the protein before, or immediately after. I just think eating before maximizes the chances of that protein going to good use, considering time to get home, digestion time, etc.

You could do before AND after the workout if you wanted which would be the most ideal, if you had the ambition.

Brob2
06-28-11, 05:10 PM
Always keep in mind: Less time, but harder. Its better to do say 10 reps of something before muscle fatigue than 40. If you can do more than 12-15, add 5 pounds or whatever the smallest weight increment is.

Second, and what many people forget, is that if you want to put on visible muscle, you have to eat. If you loose more calories in a day than you consume, you'll end up smaller. I recommend whey protein powder in a drink 45 minutes before you start.

Third, don't plateau. I was fairly aggressive this summer and committed myself to adding 5 pounds every second week, I did have to dial down some weeks but now I can chest press 200 pounds 10 times x 2 sets. If you find a weight that fatigues your muscles, but never increase it for weeks, you will never get stronger, as your body will never have to exert itself.


Basic stuff, but you'll see good results if you stick to it.


Excellent advice. From a Canadian, too.

The Tipoo school of thought is that your muscles will need to burn something while you are working out as well...Its why some athletes carb load before a race, but carbs aren't ideal for muscle growth. Anecdotally, I find I can do better if I do take the protein before.

True, your muscles grow by repairing the damage done after the workout, but it takes time to digest even whey, and I think most studies showed they consumed the most protein 20-40 minutes after the workout. So you could eat the protein before, or immediately after. I just think eating before maximizes the chances of that protein going to good use, considering time to get home, digestion time, etc.

You could do before AND after the workout if you wanted which would be the most ideal, if you had the ambition.

Oh, the Tipoo School loses some ranking points here! The carbo loading thing has been pretty much debunked for endurance athletes and even more so for building muscle, perhaps giving minimal gains at best for a healthy eater. I would still focus on the protein within 20 minutes of the end of your workout, but some before sure ain't gonna hurt.

tipoo
06-29-11, 08:27 AM
Oh, the Tipoo School loses some ranking points here! The carbo loading thing has been pretty much debunked for endurance athletes and even more so for building muscle, perhaps giving minimal gains at best for a healthy eater. I would still focus on the protein within 20 minutes of the end of your workout, but some before sure ain't gonna hurt.

That's why I said carbs aren't good for building muscle. They are the first thing your body will burn, and anything unused gets turned into fat. They are basically the "dirty" form of body energy. But for sprint runners for example, some think that it gives them an edge in competitive events. But for us of course, protein is preferred. And again, there's that 45 minute window to get protein to your muscles, and counting time to get home, prepare, digest, etc, I would just take it before to be safe. But as long as we shove it down our gullets pretty close to the workouts I guess its fine :)

Alex9
06-30-11, 12:50 AM
Bodybuilding/lifting weights is one of the few things I can stay focused on and dedicated to for any extended period of time. I havent been able to lift recently due to a shoulder injury though.

And about carbs, they don't have much value for building muscle. Protein is really the key to a good diet for bodybuilding. However carbs can't be ignored because eating enough carbs ensures that you will have ample calories in your diet. If you aren't taking in enough calories, you can't build muscle no matter what. Also, I'm pretty sure that if your cells get enough energy from carbs, then amino acids from proteins won't be broken down as much to provide cells with energy. That would mean that more amino acids could be used for protein synthesis in muscle cells.

Or maybe I just butchered my biology because it's too late at night.

MMetelli13
07-20-11, 01:23 AM
You guys all rock so much for the tips; had personal issues come up (my cousin nearly meeting my pops above due to the war) had thrown me off completely until I learned he was recovering well.

Sting, I am not so good at doing aerobics just yet (I can't do a pull up to save my life, but I can do crunches and very few pushups), so am I free to alter my program or should I focus on losing weight first (I'm technically obese, though functional at 310 lbs at 6'3), then do some of those exercises?

String
07-20-11, 10:54 AM
I would start on a walk/run routine. Even with extra pounds, people have walked/ran marathons. Speaking of marathons, I think some of the marathon training for non-runner programs (whether or not you ever want to run a half marathon or even a 5k) have excellent advice on how to avoid injuries, how to perform the walk/run, and how to increase your mileage week by week. A walk/run routine is going to take some time. You might get some of that time back in more productivity, however.

You don't have to be able to do a pull up to start conditioning your body to do one. You can jump up and then slowly let yourself down with your arms a few times a day until you're able to do one pull up and then you can go from there.

Good luck!

String
07-20-11, 11:47 AM
One more thing:

Don't try to look too far ahead. Exercise in a way that makes you healthier now. Enjoy the benefits of exercise now. Get active doing things you enjoy now. For example, sometimes improving our bodies can take some time, but exercise can have immediate benefits to our moods and our intellect. Focus on those immediate benefits and keep going.

Morris86
08-11-11, 06:17 PM
I take methylin for adhd and it works best for me but I can never gain weight even with calories shakes and increasing weights.i drink lots of water with it..would anyone recomend me switching to creatine to gain mass since I already drink water all day?thanks

David20
08-15-11, 02:15 AM
Hi,string has great ideas to share , I am new to body building and it is quite helping tips for me about the body building phenomenon as new.I will try out the same order and thanks for sharing.

Conman
08-15-11, 10:20 AM
i generally keep a regimen work out with various things for each day. it goes 1 2 1 2 3 repeat.

1-chest and tris
2-back and bis
3-legs, shoulders, abs (contration on abs, i do some every day)

anonymouslyadd
08-15-11, 11:22 AM
I'm trying to do 100 crunches a day now.

Caffeinator
08-15-11, 11:48 AM
Calisthenics - I prefer tone to bulk: speed + power is better than just power. Cardio helps a lot too.

Arch101
09-30-11, 02:12 PM
I'm trying to do 100 crunches a day now.

Keep in mind if you have weight to lose up front: crunches will build muscle under the fat on your belly and push it out. If you go crazy with the crunches, you might notice that you seem to be getting fatter (which is discouraging). Combine a moderate number of crunches with continued cardio to drop the unwanted weight.

carolino
10-05-11, 01:20 AM
HI.
nice post.first of all you are going to gym after a period of time you should start your training lightly and then try to train harder gradually.try to eat healthy and drink plenty of fluid and exercise daily.best of luck!
regards

Jalen12
04-28-12, 09:32 AM
Hi friends,
Body building is very best for our health because it is an exercise for our body and make our bones strong we are still healthful and fresh.
You should also join a gym and do exercise there.

HotGaga
06-22-12, 05:18 AM
I think “Push ups” is the easiest and the best exercise for our all body parts includes chest, shoulders and arms at the same time.

tipoo
06-22-12, 09:27 AM
Keep in mind if you have weight to lose up front: crunches will build muscle under the fat on your belly and push it out. If you go crazy with the crunches, you might notice that you seem to be getting fatter (which is discouraging). Combine a moderate number of crunches with continued cardio to drop the unwanted weight.


Agreed; the secret to a six pack is that everyone already has one, it's just under varying amounts of fat. Cardio is the best way to get rid of that and let the muscle show through, after that (well, and during that) you can do crunches to make them bigger.