View Full Version : Adult AD/HD: A Reader-Friendly Guide


Tara
05-26-03, 04:30 PM
<table border="0" width="450" align="Center"><tbody><tr> <td width=27%><font face="comic sans ms"><a href="http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/1576833577/ref%3Dnosim/livingwithadd/" target="_blank"><img src="http://livingwithadd.com/mnadults.jpg" border="0" alt="Adult AD/HD: A Reader-Friendly Guide to Identifying, Understanding, and Treating Adult Attention Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder by Michele Novotni, Thomas A. Whiteman">
</a> </font></td>
<td><font face="comic sans ms" size="2">
This a great book for adults with AD/HD. It gives a basic understanding of AD/HD including different options to help manage AD/HD. The set up of the book is "ADD Friendly". <B>(2003)</B>


<center><BR><B>Purchase through Amazon<BR><font color="#440066" face="comic sans ms"><a href="http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/1576833577/ref%3Dnosim/addforums-20/" target="_blank">(US)</A><a href="http://www.amazon.ca/exec/obidos/ASIN/1576833577/ref%3Dnosim/adhdcanada-20/" target="_blank">(Canada)</A><a href="http://www.amazon.co.uk/exec/obidos/ASIN/1576833577/ref%3Dnosim/livingwithadd-21" target="_blank">(UK)</A></td> </tr> </tbody> </table>

ScatteredOne
01-01-04, 07:16 PM
I love this book! I just finished it and had to come in here to post about it. It's the first ADD book I was able to finish. It explained so many things and was written very well. At the end of each chapter, it has a "Just the Facts" section that sums up all the important parts in each chapter. The best chapter I think is the chapter on work. Since I'm having such difficulty right now on the job, it gave me great insights and explained my behaviors in such a way that I think I can stop beating myself up over them.

I know I will be reading this book again and I'll get even more insight from it, however, first I need to read my "Women with Attention Deficit Disorder" book.

pembroke
02-08-04, 01:04 PM
currently reading this book. i like it so far. i like the way it explains that ADD isn't the inability to pay attention, but inconsistent attention. that's me to a "T".

MightyMouse
03-01-04, 09:53 PM
This is an excellent book! This is one of the first books I read after being diagnosed with ADHD and it really provided me and my wife with great information on ADD/ADHD. We both got a great deal of help and information from it. I highly recommend it.

MM

Hawkeye
03-28-05, 09:05 PM
I have to disagree with the five steps of the Book, which I understand are:

1. Aha, I have it!

2. Grief

3. Support

4. Exploration

5. Dreams

Replace them with

1. Aha, I have it!

2. Celebrate having this blessing!

3. Discover what my special ADD creative blessings are

4. Define the nature of my drawbacks

5. Create the world that I will enjoy and where I will prosper, because I get to use my special ADD creative blessings and avoid my ADd drawbacks.

6. Celebrate some more because the normals whish they could be like me.


If you look at the special gifts we ADDers have because of our ADD you will understand how blessed we are. The normals (I just love that saying. I read it here on this forum) labeled ADD as a "Disorder" because we do not fit their sense of order and they are most often disturbed by our gifts and behaviours.

Yet, ADDers rarely feel or react to the "Disorder" characteristics of other ADDors.

When two ADDers converse on a common subject they are rarely disturbed by the other ADDer. Both ADDers can easily keep pace mentally with the other. Both can and do switch subjects on the fly with very little, if any confusion by the other. Both can focus on the desired subjects for a long time. Both are at the same higher intelligence level to be able to follow each other with ADD logic. They rarely get bored during the conversation. They do not have to finish the other persons sentence, because the other person talked or thought too slow.

ADD should be called Attention Expansion Advantage (AEA). We have unbelievable advantages over the normals because of the much more acute and less limited range of our five senses, and the speed of our brains to process the additional information for our use. The creative capacities and energy drives of AEA/ADD people have proven to be remarkable.

I have AEA/ADD and am very happy I do. It has provided me with far more success, fun, power, and even wealth, than I would have ever imagined without AEA/ADD.

So, grieving over discovering that a person has ADD is like being set free from prison, and feeling sorry for not being able to stay with the inmates who are still in (the normals). I would much rather be free from the normals and interact with them on my terms.

Once you discover and understand the wonderful gifts you have because of your AEA/ADD, you too will rock and roll, and have a ball doing it.

Tara
04-10-05, 07:48 PM
That would be great if all people looked at and experienced ADD the same way as you do but they don't. ADD is not wonderful for many people and they need to grieve in order to begin healing and hopefully be able to see the positives of having ADD.