View Full Version : Study: A Link Between Pesticides and ADHD


graceful
07-14-11, 03:08 AM
Yet more compelling evidence. We keep asking for a cure, and how to cope with ADHD, especially when it comes to our children. But when we are told by Doctors to start medicating at age 4 or 5, then there's something we are missing here. WHAT THE HELL IS GOING ON?

Why does my 4 year old have to be medicated? Because our environment is so laden with so many toxins that we are finally seeing the results in our most precious and fragile members of society. Why aren't we as parents asking, "HOW DO I PREVENT ADHD FROM AFFECTING MY CHILD?"

Forget CURES or MEDICATION. I WANT PREVENTION. I cured my son of his ADHD simply by changing our environment, removing as much plastic junk from our kitchen, and household, plus feeding him a diet low in meat and high in raw veggies and fruits. All organic and pesticide free. I travel 50 miles every week to buy from a local farmer, so I know what he's giving us. Of course, this is not an available option to everyone. But, wouldn't you want to do EVERYTHING possible to avoid a life of damaging medication.

http://www.time.com/time/health/article/0,8599,1989564,00.html
http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/37156010/ns/health-kids_and_parenting/

It's worth looking into, don't you agree? It can't hurt to remove these pesticides from your life. At the very least, you'll be reducing your intake of this stuff. At the very best, it could alleviate some issues with ADHD. Again, wouldn't hurt.

As always, please do your own research and educate yourself. Then make your OWN conclusions based on your own informed decisions. Remember, doctors are people too, and they do make mistakes. Many are sooo overwhelmed, and don't have time to keep up to date on new research or studies. Unfortunately, MOST rely on brochures and articles written by the very Pharmaceutical companies who have a HUGE stake in the medicine the doctors prescribe (or don't prescribe). Can we say conflict of interest?

graceful
07-14-11, 03:09 AM
Here's another interesting article....

Study: Diet May Help ADHD Kids More Than Drugs


http://www.npr.org/2011/03/12/134456594/study-diet-may-help-adhd-kids-more-than-drugs?ft=1&f=1001

graceful
07-14-11, 04:03 AM
I want to state that I DO believe that medication does help some people. But I also believe that some people (especially children) can manage just fine without it - with simple changes in their diet and environment - AGAIN, NOT EVERYONE, but some. Everyone is different, and unfortunately many doctors don't have the time or resources to carefully examine each patient on a truly individual basis. So many are forced to 'group' medicate based on their symptoms, rather than the individual issues affecting that patient.

I know many here have gone months if not years, and countless doctors, until they've found the one they are comfortable with - but not everyone is so lucky. This is just some more tools to add to your war chest against ADHD/ADD. Lord knows we could use everything available.

How many of you still let your kid(s) drink soda?


- Grace.

Dizfriz
07-14-11, 10:34 AM
That diet changes can reduce ADHD type symptoms is noting new. We have known of this for a long time.

The problem is that these changes do not work for most. If your child is one of those the it is great but most will not see any changes.

Right now, we do not know of any way to prevent ADHD except for issues with exposure to certain toxic elements such as tobacco, alcohol and lead, mostly prenatal. These are not all of the problematic substances and there are other things involved but we do pretty know of these for sure.


Forget CURES or MEDICATION. I WANT PREVENTION. I cured my son of his ADHD simply by changing our environment, removing as much plastic junk from our kitchen, and household, plus feeding him a diet low in meat and high in raw veggies and fruits. All organic and pesticide free. I travel 50 miles every week to buy from a local farmer, so I know what he's giving us. Of course, this is not an available option to everyone. But, wouldn't you want to do EVERYTHING possible to avoid a life of damaging medication. If you were able to "cure" your child's ADHD by diet changes then might I suggest that your son may not have been ADHD but may have had a sensitivity to some substance such as food that mimicked the symptoms of ADHD. You might work with a doctor with experience with this to try to pinpoint exactly what is going on.

In any case, I am very happy for both of you in this outcome.

As always, please do your own research and educate yourself. Then make your OWN conclusions based on your own informed decisions. Remember, doctors are people too, and they do make mistakes. Many are sooo overwhelmed, and don't have time to keep up to date on new research or studies. Unfortunately, MOST rely on brochures and articles written by the very Pharmaceutical companies who have a HUGE stake in the medicine the doctors prescribe (or don't prescribe). Can we say conflict of interest? You do realize that many here have done extensive research into the causes and treatment of ADHD. You may be painting with an overly broad brush when you suggest that the members rely on drug company brochures for their information.

Dizfriz

mctavish23
07-14-11, 10:51 AM
WELL, "GRASSHOPPER," let me enlighten you ( if possible).

Let's forget for the moment the serious methodological flaws the authors

readily acknowledged as required by research method, and look strictly

at the fact that ADHD can be "acquired" at any point in life;primarily

through TBI (Traumatic Brain Injury).

The operative question then is whether they had ADHD beforehand and did

this make it worse?

I already know the answer, as Ive read this study 3 times now.

I would anecdotally suspect that if you exposed anyone, especially the growing

brains of children,to pesticides (poisons) over some protracted period of time,

you'd anticipate some degree of brain damage.

Referring back to the aforementioned "flaws," more then one urine screen for

toxicity is an excellent idea.

Remember, "Wax On. Wax Off." :cool:

tc

mctavish23

(Robert)

Lunacie
07-14-11, 12:18 PM
I'm 60, so I was a child before our environment became quite so toxic, and even before me there was a family history of ADHD behaviors. My grandfather self-medicated with alcohol, which is very common. The difference now is that we have a medical diagnosis rather than the shaming labels of "stupid", "lazy", scatterbrained." And we have medical treatments overseen by doctors rather than self-medicating with things like alcohol and street drugs. I think it's a good thing, and I'm grateful that my grandchildren are getting medical help rather than growing up with low-self esteem and struggling to meet demands that are beyond their capabilities.

I don't for a second think I can pry open your mind enough to allow any thoughts other than the one you're so attached to, but I can let others know that I think your opinions are so much doo-doo.