View Full Version : Ugh...Ugh...and UGHHHHHHHH!


Rampage
08-29-11, 02:26 AM
I've posted several times about my seven year old son. He occasionally will do "well" on a med or med/combo....then it seems to peeter out so quickly.

Our latest change was spring when kapvay was started. Titrated up to .2 in the morning and .2 in the evening. also took dex spansules and celexa.

Life was looking good for a change. Then lots of agression started up again.

Switched son from dex to concerta. Life got good again. My son was still activie and somewhat hyper...but not aggressive. That is my main concern. He was just an active little boy who didn't have huge mood swings and he didn't spit, hit, bite, throw things, or slam doors.

WE had about two weeks where I couldn't believe it. We visited family out of state, and THEY couldn't believe it. WE could redirect, he would share, he didn't tantrum or demand.

Then, things fell apart again. He'll be on a med for a short time...we're talking a month...and just when we think he has a chance of being more regulated...it's like the med or med/combo quits working.

The psychiatrist asked me if maybe I wasn't expecting too much from his meds. It's pretty hard to "expect too much" when he can appear adjusted and regulated for a couple of weeks and then all of a sudden he acts like a feral animal.

I cannot wrap my head around this. Sure, I'm frustrated, but what about my little boy? This is so not fair to him.

The psychiatrist is recommending further neuropsycholgical testing to see if he falls on the high functioning autistic spectrum or aspergers.

I am so discouraged.

Do kids who fall on the autistic spectrum or who have aspergers ....can they literally have different personalities? I understand the "personality shift" when meds wear off in the evening. I get that.

I'm talking about when....on the same meds...a child behaves one way consistently but then is literally a totally different child the way they present themselves a week later?

Like, one teacher said she never knows which kid is giong to walk into the room. The nice, pleasant child, or the rude and belligerent child. This has nothing to do with meds wearing off. We're talking giong to recess pleasant and agreeable, then returning from recess a totally different person. And no, it's not triggered by a negative experience at recess.

This has happened so many times. I almost feel like my kid is going to turn to me and say he has a different name.

Is this typical with adhd or aspergers? as a reminder, my child is adopted due to prenatal meth exposure. he is demanding, hypervililant, obsessive, angry, rude, defiant, bullying, and hyperactive at his worse. he is sweet, kind, thoughtful, active, remorseful, at his best.

I do have an adhd teenager. Mainly hyperactive and impulsive. When his meds wear off, yes, he is hyper. Yes, out of control. But, it is still his face I see. The same eyes. He is still the same person.

My seven year, no. He does not have the same eyes. He is not the same person. He is feral.

Does your adhd or asperger child have inconsistent personality behaviors?

The only children I know who have aspergers...they are the same children...the same eyes...when overstimulated or highly stressed, yes, their behaviors are intensified...but it is still their face. It is more consistent.

Any thoughts you may have on this?

happytexas
08-29-11, 09:10 AM
The psychiatrist asked me if maybe I wasn't expecting too much from his meds. It's pretty hard to "expect too much" when he can appear adjusted and regulated for a couple of weeks and then all of a sudden he acts like a feral animal.

I cannot wrap my head around this. Sure, I'm frustrated, but what about my little boy? This is so not fair to him.

The psychiatrist is recommending further neuropsycholgical testing to see if he falls on the high functioning autistic spectrum or aspergers.

Though I think that the statement about "expecting too much" is ridiculous given what you have reported; consistency, whatever the result (bad, good, or mixed [such as good results overall but with one symptom not treated like impulsivity, or a rebound ])
can be found when using ADHD meds.

Is he seeing a specialist to monitor his development as related to the pre-natal meth exposure? Does he see a neurologist?

http://www.adoptmed.org/topics/prenatal-methamphetamine-exposure.html
The scant research describing the outcomes of methamphetamine-exposed children describes possible links with aggressive behavior, peer problems, and hyperactivityThere isn't a lot of info here, but there is a brief discussion of pre-natal drug exposure and ADHD:
Pre-Natal Drug Exposure and ADD/ADHD - ADD Forums - Attention ... (http://www.addforums.com/forums/showthread.php?t=22114)

There doesn't seem to be a whole lot out there on this topic. From what I'm reading, if he has "acquired" ADHD from the exposure it may explain why is isn't getting the same benefits as a child with genetically acquired ADHD. This seems to be a common issue with pre-natal meth exposed children diagnosed as ADHD--do you belong to a support group for this? you may find more information from parents in similar circumstances.

I think I would probably consult both a neurologist and a clinic like (http://www.addforums.com/forums/Pre-Natal%20Drug%20Exposure%20and%20ADD/http://www.pediatrics.uthscsa.edu/centers/hope/services.asp) this for an evaluation; either one may be able to help you find a psychiatrist that has more experience with a child with this issue. Your current psychiatrist probably just doesn't have the relevant experience; it seems there are few who do, but if you can find one perhaps he could consult with your doctor from a distance after an initial evaluation.

One thing I would want included in any further evaluations is bi-polar disorder. I don't think that personality changes like you describe are consistent with ADHD or Aspergers but it might fit with bi-polar (http://www.google.com/search?q=bi-polar+children&ie=utf-8&oe=utf-8&aq=t&rls=org.mozilla:en-US:official&client=firefox-a).

TygerSan
08-29-11, 09:16 AM
My seven year, no. He does not have the same eyes. He is not the same person. He is feral.

I'm so sorry you're having such a rough time with your son.

Can you ask him how he feels after the episodes? Does he even *remember* what's going on?

I would strongly suggest getting a full neurological workup as well. Sometimes seizures can cause severe anxiety/panic type reactions.

Also, if he has any sensory issues, he could easily become overloaded and overwhelmed, leading to some of the behavior you're dealing with, which would fit with the coming in after recess.

Overstimulated and stressed may be different than full-on panic attack/meltdown. I babysat for a kid (as far as I know neurotypical) who would have meltdowns when tired or overstimulated. His eyes did change, and I figured out that the easiest way to deal with him was to make sure he was in a place where he would not hurt himself, and quietly walk out of the room, shutting the door behind me. I wouldn't speak until he came out and found *me*, otherwise the whole mess would start up again.

The other thing about recess is that it is a *transition*, and transitions for kids with ADHD or ASD can be very difficult. I'm not a huge fan of applied behavioral analysis, or functional behavioral plans for school, but one thing that they mention is ABC: Antecedent, behavior, consequence. If you can find the antecedent (essentially the trigger for the behavior), then you have a better handle on the why. . .sometimes it's crazy what that can be (a buzzing noise that you barely hear, for example, could be such an irritant that the teacher talking sets him off).

Lunacie
08-29-11, 09:29 AM
I'm so sorry you're having such a rough time with your son.

Can you ask him how he feels after the episodes? Does he even *remember* what's going on?

I would strongly suggest getting a full neurological workup as well. Sometimes seizures can cause severe anxiety/panic type reactions.

Also, if he has any sensory issues, he could easily become overloaded and overwhelmed, leading to some of the behavior you're dealing with, which would fit with the coming in after recess.

Overstimulated and stressed may be different than full-on panic attack/meltdown. I babysat for a kid (as far as I know neurotypical) who would have meltdowns when tired or overstimulated. His eyes did change, and I figured out that the easiest way to deal with him was to make sure he was in a place where he would not hurt himself, and quietly walk out of the room, shutting the door behind me. I wouldn't speak until he came out and found *me*, otherwise the whole mess would start up again.

The other thing about recess is that it is a *transition*, and transitions for kids with ADHD or ASD can be very difficult. I'm not a huge fan of applied behavioral analysis, or functional behavioral plans for school, but one thing that they mention is ABC: Antecedent, behavior, consequence. If you can find the antecedent (essentially the trigger for the behavior), then you have a better handle on the why. . .sometimes it's crazy what that can be (a buzzing noise that you barely hear, for example, could be such an irritant that the teacher talking sets him off).

This ^ is what I was thinking also. I know my own attitude can switch in
an instant when I reach "overload mode" because of sensory issues, also
because of emotional issues. Also making transitions is very difficult. Do a
google for Sensory Processing Disorder if this is something you don't know
about yet.