View Full Version : How I cured my ADD


champ886
08-29-11, 09:25 AM
Hello all. I would like to start telling my story. To give some background, I had ADD all through childhood and into adulthood. Could never focus in class, was always the slowest worker, always an underachiever. It started to really really affect my school performance in high school where teachers were less supportive. I was called lazy, etc.

To go into a little more detail, when I was 9 years old, I was tested for food allergies that relate to behavior. I was found to be allergic to every food they tested me for, so I began a rotation diet, where one day would be the day for milk, wheat, and tomatoes, for example, another for rice, apples, cane sugar, and mangos...basically, every food had a day on this four day rotation. The days were configured so that I could have some of my favorite foods sometimes, like pizza. Switching to this diet from the ages of 9 until 10 also gave me much better variety in my diet, which I was lacking. I ended up eating less processed foods, more fruits and vegetables.

The result: teachers couldn't believe the changes they saw in me, even ones that were not privy to my treatment.

However, with adolescence came the problems again, as I was no longer able to stick to these dietary restrictions. Lack of maturity, wanting to fit in a be like everyone else, not wanting to have a home made lunch every day in front of piers, going out with friends...it was just too hard.

I fell into the depths of serious ADD once again. My mom, evidenced by her putting me on the rotation diet, was very reluctant to give me drugs. However, by the time I was in high school and I started to affect my college prospects, we decided to go the adderall route at the end of 10th grade.

My grades soared! I was a constant honor roll student. Teachers joked that I had a brains transplant. I was accepted into top universities who were impressed with my turnaround. Everything was good.

Except the sideaffects of adderall. The highs, the lows. The lack of appetite. The lack of good sleep. I also began to read about how it can cause dimentia later in life, possibly, as it is the cousin on cocaine. The long term effects are not known.

At the same time I was gaining the maturity to make my own choices.

Mainly because of ADD but also because of other issues deemed "normal", I decided to make a huge change and become a raw foodist (and vegan).

Everything dissappeared over night once I began to eat HIGH quantities of raw fruits and vegetables and no processed foods. Everything. Skin. Asthma. Athletic ability.

No more adderall side effects, no more feeling like I had ADD on stretches that I didn't take medicine. I worked as a normally functioning architect, medicine free, not even coffee.

Sure it's a huge step, but it was so worth it. Things that I didn't even plan to heal have healed, most important ADD. I recommend anyone to look into their diet. ADD is just something that I don't have to think about anymore.

And for anyone who may thing this is just me growing out of it...while staying with people I didnt know several months ago and eating what they ate (lots of bread, pasta and even small amount of cheese...and much less fresh fruits and veggies than the massive amount I eat daily). It ALL came back. In terms of the ADD, I felt like I was in high school, pre adderall. It was ridiculous.

So keep an open mind towards food as the cause of your attention deficit disorder. I can never go back. I'll post a link of a recent radio show where I tell my ADD raw vegan story if you guys are interested.

(Sorry for any typos I am on a foreign keyboard)

Lunacie
08-29-11, 09:54 AM
People can have food allergies that look like ADHD but aren't actually. I'm
glad changing your diet helped you because of your food allergies, but
diet changes do not help with actual ADHD, research has shown this
many times. There is no "cure" for ADHD at this time.

champ886
08-29-11, 10:17 AM
People can have food allergies that look like ADHD but aren't actually. I'm
glad changing your diet helped you because of your food allergies, but
diet changes do not help with actual ADHD, research has shown this
many times. There is no "cure" for ADHD at this time.

I disagree. When I became a raw foodist I no longer treated the food allergies. I eat alllll the things I was "allergic" too, a LOT of them. Only the rotation diet confronted food allergies.

Even now I have the physical symptoms of food allergies when i eat q lot of things.

But the ADD is gone. I'm not alone in having this happen.

It's been an amazing last 3 years and I just want to share it with everyone.

sarahsweets
08-29-11, 10:37 AM
There is no cure for adhd and no science to back up that dietary changes can eliminate symptoms unless you have an established allergy to certain foods. You also don't grow out of it.

champ886
08-29-11, 11:40 AM
I regret even mentioning the food allergy part when I was 9 years old

Nowadays I eat ALL the things I am "allergic" too and even have physical reactions. All of it. As much as I want. The ONLY thing I do differently is no processed foods qnd no animal products - and the most important part is probably no processed foods.

People will write me off saying I didnt have ADD despite multiple diagnosis, despite my symptoms. That's fine. But somewhere, someone will actually try eating a different way if they are desperate enough, and they will be pleasantly surprised. I learned a long time ago that you have to take all of this research with a grain of salt. :)

I hope I can help someone, that's my only goal. This is a condition that destroys lives. It's easily worth changing your diet.

And again, my diet doesn't address allergies at all.

mctavish23
08-29-11, 12:31 PM
First of all, Welcome to the FORUM.

I think it's great that you're better,for whatever reasons.

I also believe you're honestly sharing your "success" story,

which is relevant to you and your life experiences.

However, and I say this respectfully with no malice intended,

the peer reviewed research on this very subject, going all the

way back to the 1970's, does NOT support the statistical sig-

-nificance of dietary changes as a "clinical treatment"/evidence

based (research supported) intervention for ADHD.

At the same time, I respect and appreciate your anecdotal feedback,

and again Welcome you here.

Someone you may enjoy reading is John F Taylor,PhD.

He's in Oregon and is a big proponent of this.

I also believe him to be an ethical practitioner.

The problem,just like with all the Feingold data,is that

no one outside Feingold's students,which includes Dr Taylor,

has been able to replicate those same results.

From a research standpoint, that is the "gold standard"

of longitudinal validity & reliability.

The same holds true for Daniel Amen's work as well.

Thank you again.

tc

mctavish23

(Robert)

Nifferka
08-29-11, 12:52 PM
I agree with the others that say that if dietary changes cleared up your symptoms, then it probably wasn't ADHD to begin with.

Raw food diets are great! I have gone on them several times for digestive problems (and lack-of-electricity problems...) and I feel much better for it--as far as my digestive problems go. It does absolutely nothing for my ADHD symptoms. Sorry.

KCTang
08-29-11, 02:17 PM
Hi, Welcome to the forums.

Most cases of ADHD are a result of an impaired Prefrontal Cortex (too many dopamine reuptake receptors) or damage to the Prefrontal Cortex (accidentally, or during pregnancy).

This is as per Dr Russell Barkley. (See pages 12-13. He addresses the 'diet as a cause of ADHD' pretty directly.) http://www.greatschools.org/<wbr>pdfs/2200_7-barktran.pdf?date=<wbr>4-12-05 (http://www.greatschools.org/pdfs/2200_7-barktran.pdf?date=4-12-05)

Unfortunately for me, and those above, diet changes cannot reduce the number of dopamine reuptake receptors on my PFC neurons. Nor can it prevent those neurons from over-storing dopamine. Methylphenidate works, though.

Thanks for sharing.

meadd823
08-29-11, 07:57 PM
Although I respect any ones decision to be a vegan - and I am alaways happy to hear when some one finds some thing that works for them - I for one do better with some animal proteins in my diet. I simply can not exist and feel physically healthy without some variety of animal protein.

It would make our lives easier and I know for sure it would make medical research and treatment a lot more efficient if we were all alike While we are similar we are not all identical = What is good for the goose is NOT necessary good for the gander.

I think a lot has to do with our ancestors and what they ate - If I ate the same diet as my husband my plumbing would clog. He eats very little vegetables or fruits - I gotta have those and plenty of them. He can't eat a lot of fish and fruits like I do - it upsets his stomach and gives him the nasty wet farts!

Despite our difference in what we eat we are both healthy and active adults.

Again happy you found some thing that has improved your life.

425runner
08-29-11, 08:11 PM
I have to agree with the OP about the diet. I had to go on a no carb/no sugars diet because of systemic yeast infection and let me tell ya...it was hard!! For two weeks I wasn't able to function as my body was detoxing itself but after that I entered ketosis which is well studied to help with ADHD and seizures. I became very calm and ditched Vyvanse. I still drink lots of green tea to make it through the day but just changing my diet made a huge difference.

That plus taking NALT 350mg twice a day and acetyl L-carnitine 500 mg TID to help me stay sharp and focused.

sarahsweets
08-29-11, 09:02 PM
I'm sorry but I need some science and studies to back up ketosis and adhd and raw foods and adhd. To convince me. I'm sure they help a multitude of health problems but adhd is a brain disorder and foods have not done squat in attacking this issue.

Impetus
08-29-11, 09:07 PM
People can have food allergies that look like ADHD but aren't actually. I'm
glad changing your diet helped you because of your food allergies, but
diet changes do not help with actual ADHD, research has shown this
many times. There is no "cure" for ADHD at this time.

First of all, Welcome to the FORUM.

I think it's great that you're better,for whatever reasons.

I also believe you're honestly sharing your "success" story,

which is relevant to you and your life experiences.

However, and I say this respectfully with no malice intended,

the peer reviewed research on this very subject, going all the

way back to the 1970's, does NOT support the statistical sig-

-nificance of dietary changes as a "clinical treatment"/evidence

based (research supported) intervention for ADHD.

At the same time, I respect and appreciate your anecdotal feedback,

and again Welcome you here.

Someone you may enjoy reading is John F Taylor,PhD.

He's in Oregon and is a big proponent of this.

I also believe him to be an ethical practitioner.

The problem,just like with all the Feingold data,is that

no one outside Feingold's students,which includes Dr Taylor,

has been able to replicate those same results.

From a research standpoint, that is the "gold standard"

of longitudinal validity & reliability.

The same holds true for Daniel Amen's work as well.

Thank you again.

tc

mctavish23

(Robert)

Hi, Welcome to the forums.

Most cases of ADHD are a result of an impaired Prefrontal Cortex (too many dopamine reuptake receptors) or damage to the Prefrontal Cortex (accidentally, or during pregnancy).

This is as per Dr Russell Barkley. (See pages 12-13. He addresses the 'diet as a cause of ADHD' pretty directly.) http://www.greatschools.org/<WBR>pdfs/2200_7-barktran.pdf?date=<WBR>4-12-05 (http://www.greatschools.org/pdfs/2200_7-barktran.pdf?date=4-12-05)

Unfortunately for me, and those above, diet changes cannot reduce the number of dopamine reuptake receptors on my PFC neurons. Nor can it prevent those neurons from over-storing dopamine. Methylphenidate works, though.

Thanks for sharing.

Although I respect any ones decision to be a vegan - and I am alaways happy to hear when some one finds some thing that works for them - I for one do better with some animal proteins in my diet. I simply can not exist and feel physically healthy without some variety of animal protein.

It would make our lives easier and I know for sure it would make medical research and treatment a lot more efficient if we were all alike While we are similar we are not all identical = What is good for the goose is NOT necessary good for the gander.

I think a lot has to do with our ancestors and what they ate - If I ate the same diet as my husband my plumbing would clog. He eats very little vegetables or fruits - I gotta have those and plenty of them. He can't eat a lot of fish and fruits like I do - it upsets his stomach and gives him the nasty wet farts!

Despite our difference in what we eat we are both healthy and active adults.

Again happy you found some thing that has improved your life.

You guys are class acts! :cool:

I am envious of your composure.

BRAVO!

mctavish23
08-29-11, 10:50 PM
R U TALKING TO ME ? :mad:

j/k :p

I'm always glad to hear of personal success stories.

However,to quote Russ Barkley :

"Anecdotal Is Not Statistically Significant."

Unless the results can be translated "around the world,"

so to speak, it's strictly an individual phenomenon.

tc

mctavish23

(Robert)

sarek
08-30-11, 02:06 AM
It might be instructive to take a look at the threads about other conditions that mimic ADHD but are not 'the real thing'
For some of those conditions dietary changes can be part of the treatment. And if that makes the condition improve than what you have done is effectively treating a 'condition that mimics ADHD'

fallegend
08-30-11, 11:45 AM
A few years ago, in order to lose weight, I eat tomatoes three days, I feel I do have some increased attention. But did not insist. I decided to try again. Thank you for your experience.

champ886
08-30-11, 03:44 PM
Thanks so much for all of your comments. You come in here with good hearts.

I do disagree with people implying that I didn't have the read ADD (never said ADHD BTW) merely based on the way that I beat it. That doesn't seem like a fair way to analyze someone's situation...

Personally, I don't need scientific research for the benefits of trying something harmless. I do it myself :). I don't wait on science. It worked for me. And while some peope will insist and wait on expensive studies to prove whether something works are not, there are a few people like me out there that will just go out and try it for a good amount of time and see if they feel great.

I will continue to tell how the elimination of processed foods cured my ADD, and how the addition of high processed foods and especially animal protein brings it back. It's just how it is. A lot will criticize and figure out why it doesn't work but a few will try it and see what happens. Some of us out there are that desperate. And if it doesn't work, they can come right back to the drawing board. It's worth a shot regardless of the research, which with, personally, I have huge issues.

fallegend, a post like yours just makes me so happy. If you even do try don't just eat tomatos this time lol, you can have more fun than that. And if you ever try, please let me know your results.







My story is very much like this gentleman's

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PufWoT8pceo

champ886
08-30-11, 03:49 PM
I have to agree with the OP about the diet. I had to go on a no carb/no sugars diet because of systemic yeast infection and let me tell ya...it was hard!! For two weeks I wasn't able to function as my body was detoxing itself but after that I entered ketosis which is well studied to help with ADHD and seizures. I became very calm and ditched Vyvanse. I still drink lots of green tea to make it through the day but just changing my diet made a huge difference.

That plus taking NALT 350mg twice a day and acetyl L-carnitine 500 mg TID to help me stay sharp and focused.

Thanks for the story!

I am convinced that there is nothing diet cannot affect, nothing. ADD, acne, headaches, diabetes, anything. I'm just trying to show a possibility to people with ADD and ADHD that are as desperate as I was. It's not for everyone but, dammit, I owe my quality of life to changing my diet.

fallegend
08-30-11, 05:17 PM
Perhaps the feeling of hunger can release more dopamine to improve attention.

KronarTheBlack
08-30-11, 06:15 PM
I knew a guy who had ADHD. He then was in a car accident and became a vegetable with no brainwaves. So you can either eat a vegetarian diet or become a vegetable to cure your ADHD. :)

sarahsweets
08-30-11, 07:31 PM
No matter what you do dietary or otherwise there is NO PROVEN CURE. for adhd or add.

fracturedstory
08-30-11, 07:46 PM
You might want to avoid using the word 'cure' when posting in these types of communities.
You're cured of something when it's gone for good, yet you keep following the same diet to keep ADHD away.

I've done all the diets to ease up some ADHD and autism symptoms. My diet is so limited I would disappear if it wasn't for eating meat. I like me a bit o strength training too. Nuts n beans ain't gonna give me my pecs.
The GFCF diet made me less moody but because I did it before it was cool when I went to the city I almost starved to death.
I have to have a really strict diet to keep the seizures at bay and on it my ADHD symptoms aren't as bad but are still there. Sometimes a healthy sandwich will have me running up walls. Oh, it's probably because it's white bread, right?

It's great that changing your diet helped you but everyone's body reacts differently to food.

champ886
08-30-11, 08:18 PM
You might want to avoid using the word 'cure' when posting in these types of communities.
You're cured of something when it's gone for good, yet you keep following the same diet to keep ADHD away.

I've done all the diets to ease up some ADHD and autism symptoms. My diet is so limited I would disappear if it wasn't for eating meat. I like me a bit o strength training too. Nuts n beans ain't gonna give me my pecs.
The GFCF diet made me less moody but because I did it before it was cool when I went to the city I almost starved to death.
I have to have a really strict diet to keep the seizures at bay and on it my ADHD symptoms aren't as bad but are still there. Sometimes a healthy sandwich will have me running up walls. Oh, it's probably because it's white bread, right?

It's great that changing your diet helped you but everyone's body reacts differently to food.

Just putting it out there. I mentioned a raw unprocessed foods diets...never mentioned beans or sandwiches. Maybe that works but it's not what I do so I can't comment? I can only mention what I do and how it worked.

Now, as to whether someone is "cured" or not because they eat a certain way. This way of eating has helped with so many conditions, including ADD - so I'm not eating this way just to keep ADD away - I feel great. To say I'm not cured because I am not able to eat a standard american diet and still not have ADD is silly. I think that diet was CAUSING my ADD. I'm not sure if I start doing heroin that I'll have ADD or not either...but no one would say I'm not sured because heroin might possibly bring my ADD back.

Anyway this is just for the people who may be inspired to try something. Not really here to discuss or talk about research. It does it for me. It may do it for you.

:)

fallegend I doubt that it has something to do with hunger. I eat a lot. I'm never hungry...or, I'm hungry much less than I was prior.

KronarTheBlack
08-30-11, 08:40 PM
I will continue to tell how the elimination of processed foods cured my ADD, and how the addition of high processed foods and especially animal protein brings it back. It's just how it is.

Ask yourself this. What has a higher probability?

You were misdiagnosed as having ADD due to your specific food allergy complications.

OR You had ADD and YOU BEAT ADD by changing your diet to raw foods which affected billions of neurotransmitters and chemicals in your brain causing them to act normally instead of the way they act with ADD.

Considering that the nutrients in food DO NOT PASS THE BLOOD/BRAIN BARRIER I would guess the probability for the first scenario is so close to 100% it might as well be 100% and the second scenario's probability is so close to zero it might as well be zero.

You can believe whatever you want but it does not make it true to anyone but yourself (who believes the delusion). The reality is that you have convinced yourself that you beat ADD to make up for your lack of confidence and self worth and now come to an internet message board where people have lived their entire lives with ADD saying that you beat ADD by changing your diet. Would it seem equally ridiculous for me to say that I beat ADD by just concentrating and willing my brain to work better?

The only difference is a few raw carrots and some snake oil.

fallegend
08-30-11, 11:00 PM
I decided to try from now on, in order to quickly get results, I did not sleep at night with the help of Ritalin. The next few days, I will eat fruit and vegetables not use drugs. I want to see if I can hold the attention.

KronarTheBlack
08-31-11, 01:09 AM
I decided to try from now on, in order to quickly get results, I did not sleep at night with the help of Ritalin. The next few days, I will eat fruit and vegetables not use drugs. I want to see if I can hold the attention.

I wish you best of luck. Post your results.

fallegend
08-31-11, 01:22 AM
My lunch, two cucumbers, three tomatoes, three apples, now feel good.

Etcetera
08-31-11, 02:32 AM
Although I do believe that, for instance, aspartame makes me all weird and funny (oh, I do remember my first can of diet coke... I went all coocoo and lunatic and I felt like I just ran into a Freakazoid cartoon), I find it hard to believe you could "cure" real ADHD.

It just reminds me of this girl I once spoke with, who claims to probably have "a little bit of ADHD" and that her ADHD boyfriend just needed to learn how to plan and use a calendar and now can get off the meds because he had learned that.

champ886
08-31-11, 11:57 AM
I'm going to ignore people who are saying I didn't have real ADD but are unwilling to give something a try because it's too hard or because science doesn't understand it yet. If science had a complete view of the possibilities and had nothing more to learn, they would cease researching. You are welcome to your own opinion.

My lunch, two cucumbers, three tomatoes, three apples, now feel good.

great to hear man. Listen, if you get discouraged or feel hungry or anything, do not hesitate to PM me here or I can even send you my email address. Not to put pressure on you or anything but some people do need support or give up when they feel hungry, not understanding that they can always eat more or what to eat...and that fruit are always more filling and more calorie dense than vegetables. Eat to your heart's content and know that I am there.

My breakthrough moment was when one day I decided that I would eat grapefruits, not even a very high calorie fruit, until I was full, instead of breaking off a piece of adderall (I had been weaning myself off). I felt great after that first fruit meal, so much focus.

For anyone's future reference, in terms of fruits and vegetables you can keep eating until you are full even if it seems like a lot. No rule against eating 10 apples until satisfied if need be :)

Best of luck to you all

pechemignonne
08-31-11, 08:41 PM
Raw foods make me sick. Just saying, it's an individual thing.

There's no reason why uncooked vegetables would be less healthy than raw vegetables, and they are harder to digest in their raw form. I don't really digest raw vegetables at all.

As for being vegan, again that's an individual thing. Human diets vary widely over populations. For sure, you could argue based on some studies that vegans are healthier, less chance of heart disease, diabetes, cancer etc. But then there are the Inuit, whose traditional diet consisted of virtually only fish and animal fat. They also had very low rates of heart disease, diabetes, and cancer.

I'm glad your diet helps you, but I don't think it is right for you to claim that it will "cure" ADHD in other people.

fallegend
08-31-11, 10:32 PM
After a day of totally vegetarian,
This morning, I felt calmer than before, no serious drowsiness feeling, attention is better than before, but not enough, so I continued to take Ritalin, and now feel great.
I think medication can speed up my metabolism, so that the effect of eating vegetarian will be reflected more quickly.

The patient's good news. Bad news for pharmaceutical companies.

mctavish23
09-03-11, 05:22 PM
And To You As Well

This thread helps provide a perfect example of "individual"/anecdotal success

stories vs the longitudinal validity & reliability of carefully controlled studies,

reported in peer reviewed journals.

It's like apple & oranges (no pun intended). :eek:

tc

mctavish23

(Robert)

johnny_walker
09-03-11, 07:36 PM
After a day of totally vegetarian,
This morning, I felt calmer than before, no serious drowsiness feeling, attention is better than before, but not enough, so I continued to take Ritalin, and now feel great.
I think medication can speed up my metabolism, so that the effect of eating vegetarian will be reflected more quickly.

The patient's good news. Bad news for pharmaceutical companies.

Your just contradicting yourself right there, as you are still using ritalin because it is not enough. So in the end, you still need the pharmaceutical company to help you "focus your attention".

Sometimes, its better to have something that nothing at all.

Keep Walking

Johnny Walker

champ886
09-04-11, 04:19 AM
Your just contradicting yourself right there, as you are still using ritalin because it is not enough. So in the end, you still need the pharmaceutical company to help you "focus your attention".

Sometimes, its better to have something that nothing at all.

Keep Walking

Johnny Walker

lol

i wouldnt shoot down what he said because he still uses a drug

no one stops overnight

i didnt stop litterally overnight...

the things you have to do to impress people lol...from full dose to no medicine OVERNIGHT is damn near impossible

i took months to wean myself

wow



dont let people discourage you legend you are trying something yourself...if it works it works if it doesnt it doesnt...youll have a story to tell while others will have peer reviewed studies to point at

champ886
09-04-11, 04:26 AM
Id love to see the study on ADD where someone goes on a high fresh fruit and vegetable diet and eliminates processed foods. These studies like to look at one small piece of the picture or another, but they never go out and do big picture studies. There is so much about food that we don't understand...most nutrients are unknown I believe.

mctavish23
09-04-11, 06:10 PM
Then please do so, as the research goes back to the 1970's.

As for going "cold turkey," depending on the age of the individual,

that happens with stimulants on a regular basis, as they are urinated

out of the system within a 24 hr period.

Individual differences in brain & body chemistry aside, stimulants are not

usually subject to having to be "weaned" off of.

However, that is certainly not the case with so many meds;all of which

not psychiatric in nature.

This (ADHD) is primarily about molecular genetics, and the (genetic)

vulnerability to a trait within the general population, that impairs

inhibition and self-control.

There have been a number of "promising" studies on pharmaceutical

grade Omega's, as well as a high protein diet, however, NONE of those

have as yet met the "gold standard" for longitudinal validity & reliability.

If and when they do, that will be a HUGE benefit for everyone with ADHD.

Until then, keeping strictly within the guidelines surrounding the current

science behind the disorder, there's NO empirical support for dietary inter-

-ventions as a Clinical Treatment for the disorder of ADHD.

As I previously posted, someone I respect in the topic area of this thread,

although there is No Way he'd ever use the word "cured," is Dr John F Taylor

of Oregon.

Hope that helps.

tc

mctavish23

(Robert)

Kaimei
09-05-11, 07:11 AM
Id love to see the study on ADD where someone goes on a high fresh fruit and vegetable diet and eliminates processed foods. These studies like to look at one small piece of the picture or another, but they never go out and do big picture studies. There is so much about food that we don't understand...most nutrients are unknown I believe.

I'll trade you anecdotal evidence for anecdotal evidence. Growing up, my brother and I were not allowed to have processed food, except in the extremely rare occasion when my family went out to eat at a restaraunt. If we stayed at a friend's house, we either had to come home before breakfast, take our own foods, or my mother would call my friend's parents with very strict rules about what we could and could not eat. I didn't taste Top Ramen or Lucky Charms until I was 18. Nor did I eat school lunches - we always had them packed for us.

We grew our own vegetables - we had an enormous garden. We picked our own fruits and berries either from friends and family, or drove further into the mountains to pick them. We made our own jams and jellies, did our own canning and baking.

We had chickens, which were free range, so we had our own eggs. Cheese and milk was bought from a small local dairy that served only the local community; sometimes the milk wasn't even pasteurized. (I know that might sound gross to some people, but I LOVED it.) Red meat was either from cattle we raised, or from the occasional year we went hunting. The first time I ate meat from a grocery store was the same year I had Lucky Charms.

In this day and age, you probably aren't going to find many people my age - 34 - with that kind of dietary history. It was about as healthy, wholesome, fresh and unprocessed as you can get.

Yet oddly enough...I had all the same ADHD related problems at six, eight, nine, and fourteen as I did at 34, when I was diagnosed.

If your diet brings you relief, great! That's fantastic, you found something that works. And yes, there are some people who will try ANYTHING for some kind of relief. Some of them do get symptom improvement by altering their diet. Some of them are probably getting that improvement because their diet lacked something that aggravated their symptoms. MSG is a common food additive that causes all KINDS of problems - I had to eliminate it completely from my diet, and I felt amazingly better. Processed foods are unhealthy, I concur.

However, there are genetic factors involved in ADHD - they've been mapped. And there are NO foods that will alter your DNA or affect your genetic structure.

I highly advocate any reasonable means someone discovers for alleviating their symptoms or improving their health overall. However, using the word 'cure' for a disorder that has none is, at the least, ignorant; at its worst, its just cruel.

A genuine cure is the permanent end to a disease or a condition. Antibiotics cure bacterial infections, because they permanently stop the effects of the bacteria on the body. A behavior, medication, or other mechanism that reduces or stops undesirable symptoms is management.

It's inappropriate to use the word cure if you need to stay on the diet to manage your symptoms. A lot of people here have struggled for years with something they know they will never be free of, and it's caused a lot of pain. If you want people to respect the validity of your situation, you have to respect the validity of theirs.

whatsthebuzz
09-07-11, 11:46 AM
It's inappropriate to use the word cure if you need to stay on the diet to manage your symptoms. A lot of people here have struggled for years with something they know they will never be free of, and it's caused a lot of pain. If you want people to respect the validity of your situation, you have to respect the validity of theirs.

I think I almost cried a bit there. Thank you for pointing that out. I know he means well when he introduces us to an alternative to drugs that he thinks will make us ADHD-free but he's being a little naive when he thinks that he above all people has found the 'cure' and despite over 70 years of research into ADHD that it just turns out just to be a case of mismanagement of diet. While there are some genetic disorders in which dietary control are crucial and will cause terrible outcomes if not addressed (ie phenylketonuria) for ADHD neither diet or method of rearing has shown to be the cause of ADHD. to say that diet is what becomes ADHD is like breaking someone's arm with a bat and then saying its that type of plaster that is wrapped around the arm that caused the broken bone. The type plaster may make the difference between healing better but it certainly does not have that much significance for the bone to heal and certainly isn't the cause of the injury. I for one have been raw , vegan , vegetarian , macrobiotic and have not seen any changes that lead me to believe that I could truly be everything I wanted to be on diet alone. Not going down the medication route has cost me alot over the years. He needs to count himself lucky that he managed to get on meds during high school , well before university. whereas those of us with a late diagnosis had to endure years of underachievement no matter how hard we tried.

qanda
09-07-11, 09:05 PM
Here's and interesting article I ready recently:

Study Show Positive Results of Dietary Changes on ADHD Children

Author: Kala Viv Williams
Published: March 14, 2011 at 1:53 pm
Share
53



There is a new study that while hopeful, is bound to stir controversy over treating children with ADHD. The lead study author is Dr. Lidy Pelsser of the ADHD Research Centre in the Netherlands. The findings were reported in the February issue of The Lancet Journal. She found that in 64 percent of the children in the study were actually suffering from a reaction to various foods in their diet that seemed to trigger the disorder. The study followed 100 children with ADHD symptoms between the ages of four and eight years old.

They were divided into two groups. Half were allowed to eat only a small number of foods for five weeks; their diets were customized from a short list of ingredients that included water, rice, turkey, lamb, lettuce, carrots, pears and other hypoallergenic foods. The control group children and families were told about healthful eating but were allowed to eat anything as usual.

After the severe restriction on this diet of foods chosen to be hypoallergenic-the children are gradually adding foods back in and watching for signs. "We've followed all these children for about a year, and each child reacts to different foods," Dr. Pelsser said. "For one child, triggers included beets, tomatoes, wheat and bananas; for another, it was fish, pork, eggs and oranges."

Other studies will follow to see if results are replicated; one flaw of this study is that it is not a blind study-obviously the child and parents knew diet had changed and thus various other factors such as expectation, could have played a part. To listen to the Dr. discuss the ADHD study go to NPR.

The challenge now will be training doctors to educate patients and shepard them through the protocol to see if it works in their case. It seems worthwhile to try before putting our children on medications, that frankly we don't know long-term side effects of.



Read more: http://technorati.com/lifestyle/article/study-show-positive-results-of-dietary/#ixzz1XJoi0Rk7

croweater
09-07-11, 09:18 PM
This sounds like the "Failsafe" diet, which I have seen work for children with non-specific behavioural problems (i.e. anecdotally in children of friends, etc), although not necessarily those formally diagnosed with ADHD. I guess we can all benefit from a diet free of artificial additives.

qanda
09-07-11, 09:24 PM
Food additives and hyperactive behaviour in 3-year-old and 8/9-year-old children in the community: a randomised, double-blinded, placebo-controlled trial.
McCann D, Barrett A, Cooper A, Crumpler D, Dalen L, Grimshaw K, Kitchin E, Lok K, Porteous L, Prince E, Sonuga-Barke E, Warner JO, Stevenson J.
Source
School of Psychology, Department of Child Health, University of Southampton, Southampton, UK.
Erratum in
Lancet. 2007 Nov 3;370(9598):1542.
Abstract
BACKGROUND:
We undertook a randomised, double-blinded, placebo-controlled, crossover trial to test whether intake of artificial food colour and additives (AFCA) affected childhood behaviour.

METHODS:
153 3-year-old and 144 8/9-year-old children were included in the study. The challenge drink contained sodium benzoate and one of two AFCA mixes (A or B) or a placebo mix. The main outcome measure was a global hyperactivity aggregate (GHA), based on aggregated z-scores of observed behaviours and ratings by teachers and parents, plus, for 8/9-year-old children, a computerised test of attention. This clinical trial is registered with Current Controlled Trials (registration number ISRCTN74481308). Analysis was per protocol.

FINDINGS:
16 3-year-old children and 14 8/9-year-old children did not complete the study, for reasons unrelated to childhood behaviour. Mix A had a significantly adverse effect compared with placebo in GHA for all 3-year-old children (effect size 0.20 [95% CI 0.01-0.39], p=0.044) but not mix B versus placebo. This result persisted when analysis was restricted to 3-year-old children who consumed more than 85% of juice and had no missing data (0.32 [0.05-0.60], p=0.02). 8/9-year-old children showed a significantly adverse effect when given mix A (0.12 [0.02-0.23], p=0.023) or mix B (0.17 [0.07-0.28], p=0.001) when analysis was restricted to those children consuming at least 85% of drinks with no missing data.

INTERPRETATION:
Artificial colours or a sodium benzoate preservative (or both) in the diet result in increased hyperactivity in 3-year-old and 8/9-year-old children in the general population.

Comment in
Lancet. 2007 Nov 3;370(9598):1524-5.
PMID: 17825405 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
Publication Types, MeSH Terms, Substances, Secondary Source ID

LinkOut - more resources

Supplemental Content

Cited by 10 PubMed Central articles
Correlation between attention deficit hyperactivity disorder and sugar consumption, quality of diet, and dietary behavior in school children.
[Nutr Res Pract. 2011]Correlation between attention deficit hyperactivity disorder and sugar consumption, quality of diet, and dietary behavior in school children.
Kim Y, Chang H.
Nutr Res Pract. 2011 Jun; 5(3):236-45. Epub 2011 Jun 21.
Ion mobility spectrometry for the rapid analysis of over-the-counter drugs and beverages.
[Int J Ion Mobil Spectrom. 2009]Ion mobility spectrometry for the rapid analysis of over-the-counter drugs and beverages.
Fernández-Maestre R, Hill HH.
Int J Ion Mobil Spectrom. 2009 Aug; 12(3):91-102. Epub 2009 Jul 1.
Lower maternal folate status in early pregnancy is associated with childhood hyperactivity and peer problems in offspring.
[J Child Psychol Psychiatry. 2010]Lower maternal folate status in early pregnancy is associated with childhood hyperactivity and peer problems in offspring.
Schlotz W, Jones A, Phillips DI, Gale CR, Robinson SM, Godfrey KM.
J Child Psychol Psychiatry. 2010 May; 51(5):594-602. Epub 2009 Oct 28.
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MW: 144.10 g/mol
MF: C7H5NaO2
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Food additives and hyperactive behaviour in 3-year-old and 8/9-year-old children...
Food additives and hyperactive behaviour in 3-year-old and 8/9-year-old children in the community: a randomised, double-blinded, placebo-controlled trial.
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Another article explained a theory that these researchers had on why some people react to the dyes and some do not. Something about histamines. Sorry, but it was complicated and I can't recall it.

sarahsweets
09-07-11, 09:29 PM
Mctavish cured my adhd 5 minutes ago for 2 easy payments of $19.95

schrodingerkat3
09-07-11, 09:30 PM
I've been a vegetarian for almost two years and I say vegetarian because even though I'm practically vegan, I will eat eggs and cheese or drink milk when I'm in a financial pinch. Being vegan isn't cheap you know lol. So I said all that to say that I'm still as adhd as ever when I'm off my meds. Dietary changes have done wonders for my health, weight, asthma and overall appearance but nothing for my add. To each their own I suppose. Congratulations on your success.

pechemignonne
09-07-11, 10:59 PM
Half were allowed to eat only a small number of foods for five weeks; their diets were customized from a short list of ingredients that included water, rice, turkey, lamb, lettuce, carrots, pears and other hypoallergenic foods
I think I would rather eat arsenic than adopt this "nutritious diet". As long as the arsenic is sprinkled on donuts.

qanda
09-07-11, 11:59 PM
When I read this I thought the same thing, but after reading more in depth these researchers realize you would NOT be healthy with these permanent restrictions. The study does not say it is "nutritious" as you said. They are severely restricting your diet for a limited time only. You would have to add foods back in to find the specific foods that are causing problems as they did (which was mentioned in the article), so therefore the final diet would not be so severely restricted. Even so, some might opt for meds rather than restrict any foods. Still interesting and a possible option though, and options are always nice!

champ886
09-08-11, 07:21 PM
lol @ people not only saying that I didnt have ADD

but now my diet on whole foods and no animal products is unhealthy, and im not really cured because it is restrictful

i mean you MIGHT have an argument if I was doing this just for ADD

but the fact that it ended plenty of other "health problems" i had, nothing live threatening, but things that became more obvious after I changed them...just makes it all sooooo worth it

Medicine fights symptoms. What I do fights diseases. Multiple ones.

Just trying to put "restrictive" in a context.

Popping pills might be easier for me in a time schedule sense. But the side efffects, the long term effects, and the fact that you need a different drug for every condition. I'd have to be crazy to take that option.

Just my opinion. You are entitled to yours.

The only reason I made this thread is not debate. I made it because it may help one person, or two, or three. That's all. I just hope all the negativity doesn't discourage any of these people from being adventurous and opening up their minds and letting their bodies determine what is right for them or not.

mctavish23
09-08-11, 08:19 PM
I certainly never said you did or didn't have ADHD.

However, since THIS is an ADHD FORUM in which YOU

posted "HOW I CURED MY ADD," it's irrational to assume

there wouldn't be some level of "debate."

The title alone guarantees that.

Therefore, I find your comments to be in direct contradiction

with the title of your thread.

I do agree that your entire synopsis is 100 % anecdotal personal

opinion;albeit deleivered in a somewhat smug & grandiose manner,

via the title.

On the other hand, I really like ganda's two posts with references.

I love reading the research, so thank you.

I familiar with the first study and am intrigued by the second.

Both of these represent what I alluded to earlier as recent examples

of nutrition studies getting more attention, as well as showing promise.

The only way for any meaningful changes in clinical guidelines to

take place, is through the rigorous process of following the scientific

method.

fallegend
09-09-11, 10:43 AM
Practice has proved that vegetarian diet is effective in increasing attention.
Now my daily protein intake is less than 10g, but my attention has been greatly improved. I will continue to be vegetarian.

SweetCode
09-09-11, 10:51 AM
Sometime ago before I was diagnosed with ADD and started taking ritalin I was vegetarian , I was eating only raw organic food , drinking only water or juice and exercising 5x/week , I was felling healthy , energized and in shape... but nothing changed about the ADD...

AshT
09-11-11, 10:51 AM
I disagree. When I became a raw foodist I no longer treated the food allergies. I eat alllll the things I was "allergic" too, a LOT of them. Only the rotation diet confronted food allergies.

Even now I have the physical symptoms of food allergies when i eat q lot of things.

But the ADD is gone. I'm not alone in having this happen.

It's been an amazing last 3 years and I just want to share it with everyone.
I'm a bit of a health freak when it comes to eating. I make sure i eat really healthy because I want to stay fit for the societies im in (krav maga, football, etc). I also insist on going to farms to buy fresh veg and meat because they are kinder to the animals and don't have anywhere near as much crap in them.

I still have problems with concentration, disorganisation, not being able to stand still etc.

My EEG scans always come back abnormal, my brain works differently to other peoples. That cannot be cured by what i eat.

qanda
09-11-11, 11:56 AM
The one study that I mentioned showed that individuals reacted to different foods. One food may cause Adhd behaviors in one person while that same food might be fine for another individual - another food might be a problem for him/her. For example: the study mentioned beets might be the culprit for one person but not the others. Are beets healthy, sure, but they may have to be eliminated in some. Am I convinced this works - no - but I'd love to hear from those who have tried it.

I often read this same thing with prescription meds, one might work well for some but not others. Why? If I knew that I suppose I'd be rich!

Please, someone explain to me why these negative reactions do not occur when someone post about a prescription med that works for them. Especially when the alternative is a healthy one already that can certainly do no harm if tried. The general attitude is simply more positive for prescription meds, even if they are posting that med did not work for them.

Why am I so passionate about alternatives. Because when a doctor told me she thought my daughter has a mood disorder & I researched her suggested med, I almost cried. Bipolar is not an easy thing to deal with. On a bipolar site (& maybe even on this one) a parent suggested an alternative, a vitamin very high in vit B. Many on that site saw positive results. Even my husband, who thought this vitamin was a bunch of Hogwash, now makes sure that she takes her vitamins as the changes in her are so positive. I, as others who find something that works so well, have an obligation to share our results. Hopefully us sharing our experiences will prompt research to prove what we already know - it does work for some because it worked for us.
Thank you to those who have the courage to share your experiences.

pechemignonne
09-11-11, 12:19 PM
Please, someone explain to me why these negative reactions do not occur when someone post about a prescription med that works for them. Especially when the alternative is a healthy one already that can certainly do no harm if tried. The general attitude is simply more positive for prescription meds, even if they are posting that med did not work for them.
1. Prescription medications have scientifically studied and reproducible benefits. Not for everyone, but for a statistically significant number of people. Dietary changes have been researched many times and found to not have the same effects. Prescription medications are the best treatment option for most people with ADHD (in combination with psychotherapy and certain lifestyle changes). That is a fact. That is the current state of ADHD treatment.

2. If someone said on these forums, for example, "I cured my ADHD with Adderall, it is the best medication and everyone should try it and all other medications are just ways for pharma companies to make money", I can guarantee you that they would not get an overwhelmingly positive response.

3. Not all the "alternative" treatments are harmless. For some people, just going off their medication is dangerous. I think that a "raw food diet" is unhealthy and dangerous. It is based on myths and pseudo-science. Human beings have always cooked their food. Even homo erectus cooked their food.

"Studies reveal that raw foodists are under energy deficits that cause half of raw foodist women to
suffer amenorrhea." http://www.epjournal.net/filestore/EP08340342.pdf

I think most people on these forums would be more than happy to be "cured" by a few supplements or a lifestyle change, but it's just not very realistic. Many of us have spent years without medication, trying various means to get rid of our symptoms, to no avail. So it is very frustrating to us to have someone come around and suggest that we are just mindlessly pill-popping when we could just eat more fruit.

peripatetic
09-11-11, 12:28 PM
Please, someone explain to me why these negative reactions do not occur when someone post about a prescription med that works for them. Especially when the alternative is a healthy one already that can certainly do no harm if tried. The general attitude is simply more positive for prescription meds, even if they are posting that med did not work for them.

i suspect that the phrasing and the claims have a lot to do with it. i've never seen someone post a thread that ___ medication "cured" their adhd. i disagree that people dismiss the benefits of eating a healthy diet, exercise, adequate rest, etc. i think what's being dismissed is the claim of a "cure".

peripatetic
09-11-11, 01:05 PM
I think most people on these forums would be more than happy to be "cured" by a few supplements or a lifestyle change, but it's just not very realistic. Many of us have spent years without medication, trying various means to get rid of our symptoms, to no avail. So it is very frustrating to us to have someone come around and suggest that we are just mindlessly pill-popping when we could just eat more fruit.

there are some really good points in there as well, ganda. a lot of members aren't posting just to denounce an alternative, but to balance the "cure" claims with some perspective. and that's not necessarily just for the members reading the thread, but also for visitors...people who might read the claims and question themselves...why am i such a failure?...or those with adhd in their lives...you don't need medication...youjust need a proper diet (or a stricter upbringing, etc). this site is for support...AND information...and putting huge claims into perspective is important.

the fact is a lot of people initially think (perhaps just hopefully) that medication will mitigate all of their symptoms. for most of us...for every person i know well...that's not realistic either. this medication, that supplement, a workshop or therapy series, a planner, a whiteboard...those may all help manage a person's adhd to varying degrees...but not cure it. if you look around you'll find numerous threads where people make more reasonable claims and they are not met with hostility at all.

Kaimei
09-11-11, 04:46 PM
The one study that I mentioned showed that individuals reacted to different foods. One food may cause Adhd behaviors in one person while that same food might be fine for another individual - another food might be a problem for him/her. For example: the study mentioned beets might be the culprit for one person but not the others. Are beets healthy, sure, but they may have to be eliminated in some. Am I convinced this works - no - but I'd love to hear from those who have tried it.

I often read this same thing with prescription meds, one might work well for some but not others. Why? If I knew that I suppose I'd be rich!

Please, someone explain to me why these negative reactions do not occur when someone post about a prescription med that works for them. Especially when the alternative is a healthy one already that can certainly do no harm if tried. The general attitude is simply more positive for prescription meds, even if they are posting that med did not work for them.

Why am I so passionate about alternatives. Because when a doctor told me she thought my daughter has a mood disorder & I researched her suggested med, I almost cried. Bipolar is not an easy thing to deal with. On a bipolar site (& maybe even on this one) a parent suggested an alternative, a vitamin very high in vit B. Many on that site saw positive results. Even my husband, who thought this vitamin was a bunch of Hogwash, now makes sure that she takes her vitamins as the changes in her are so positive. I, as others who find something that works so well, have an obligation to share our results. Hopefully us sharing our experiences will prompt research to prove what we already know - it does work for some because it worked for us.
Thank you to those who have the courage to share your experiences.

Actually, I'm definitely with you when it comes to choosing healthier alternatives to popping pills. As I said in my earlier post, I support anyone's choice to make reasonable dietary changes that either reduce their symptoms or improve their overall health. By reasonable, I mean something like your beet analogy above, reducing problematic foods or ingredients, processed sugars, red meat, caffeine, etc. - I do NOT mean something radical like living on a diet based entirely on pureed organic carrots and juiced garlic cloves or some such thing.

Shortly after I turned 18, I began suffering from horrendous migraines, and the only thing that eased the agony was a barbiturate. I'd lose days from my life, and I lived in constant dread of the next one. I'd been hospitalized for them, and gone through extensive testing to try and find a cause. Eventually, I was just told I'd have to deal with them and given three different prescriptions to deal with them. Until the day when a friend of mine casually mentioned that MSG gave her headaches, and she'd noticed that I always got a migraine the day we ate at a certain restaurant. I undertook my own little study, and found out that eliminating MSG from my diet reduced my migraines from three or more a month to one or two a year. No more need for barbiturates or anything else, but I had to give up my PMS snacking on Cool Ranch Doritos.

Likewise, dietary deficiencies or allergies can cause a wide range of issues, and I endorse treating those by a natural route rather than out of a prescription bottle. From an evolutionary standpoint, we need certain foods to supply us with nutrients, and urban, modern lifestyles do not conform easily to meeting those needs. Additionally, I agree that pesticides and other chemicals being introduced to our food, water and environment can have negative impacts on us. Lead. DDT. Etc., etc.

There's nothing wrong with using a holistic approach to health, but I feel the same way about that as I do the Western method - it's important to realize that both of them have their own limitations. Not everything can be entirely treated or cured by just 'one way.' It's the advocacy of one 'superior' method over another that bugs me, as well as the idea that diet can cure everything. It can cure something like scurvy, or help maintain bone density to prevent broken bones, but if I have sickle cell anemia or a compound fracture, I need something different.

It's balance that's important, and that balance is entirely unique to the individual.

champ886
09-12-11, 07:25 AM
Thanks Kaimei and qanda

I just want to clarify that nowadays I don't manage a 100 percent raw foods diet, those are my ideals and I will soon be back there. I probably have fallen to about 80 percent realistically, not because raw makes me feel worse, but because it is a stressful time where I have to grab and go a lot, etc. I may even have less during plenty of stretches, and CERTAINLY on a lot of days, like yesterday, it's not like I am measuring. But I feel a correlation with how I feel overall and the amount of fruits and vegetables that I am eating. I really do. That includes my ADD. The more fruits and vegetables and the less processed foods that I eat over the course of any stretch, the better I feel.

So of course I felt like I came across something...something huge.

I am just talking about HIGH HIGH amounts of fruits and vegetables. It has make a huge difference for me across the board, and it is something that almost no one does, so I want to share it with anyone. There are surely a very very large amount of people like me. Think about it. It's inevitable! There are so many people that suffer from attention problems.



I DO use the word cure, because that is the impact it has had on me for a host of problems. Not raw foodism necessarily, maybe not even the total veganism - it is possible that small small amounts of animal products would allow me to not take meds - it's just hard for me to speak on that because I haven't tried it. I can only speak on what I've tried. That does no mean that others cannot. That doesn't mean I can get the same results with cooked vegetables, necessarily. I think the most important this is just the high high quantities of fruits and vegetables and, again, the lessening of the processed foods, oils, etc. I do the better incrementally when the "good" is increased and the bad is decreased. These are my findings over the course of almost 4 years.

But I use the word cure because I have that right. I do. No, to me the medical community does NOT have confidential rights to the word cure on their terms. No, cure does not mean that you have to not revamp your dietary intake to something a lot healthier, a lot fresher, and beat a medical condition through western means. I'm sorry, it does not. What I consider my cure is not extreme to me. If someone were to leave their family and friends to move to the tropics to get sun all day in order to beat their disease, maybe that would be extreme. Personally, I thought that taking adderall and having friends and family members, and most strongly myself, deal with the highs and lows of that treatment - THAT was extreme to me. I thought that worrying about problems that cocaine addicts get, like dimentia, when I get older - I thought that was extreme. This is easy. And like I said it helps everything, not just my ADD.

There are certainly many many people like me, using logic alone. I want to help people, even if it's one person. Very few will try it, but one person always has expressed improvements from changing his diet somewhat, and that makes it all worth it. And I will not stop using the world cure, as I have every right to use it that someone else does.

There is great evidence that a healthy, plant based diet (as opposed to an unhealthy one, to be clear) can have great impact on cancer growth, that it can whipe out diabetes and most especially heart diseasse, along with a bunch of ther conditions that we see the most in Western Countries that eat a Western diet. ADD is one of those diseases. I said why not try it and I'm thanking my lucky stars that I decided to do so.

So please don't take it offensively. I'm glad some people here understand taht I'm just trying to help and that my anecdotes are no less legitimate than anyone elses just because I'm the only one trying what I am doing. ADD is a debilitating condition. Do you understand how powerful it is to a young kid that could never ever concentrate to be able to finish architectural projects for school all without medication? Do be able to stay on task for hours without a pill? It brought tears to my eyes.

Thanks everyone that's supportive as the response has really got me down. But this will undoubtably help more people, so for that I can only be greatful. If only I had the money to do a pier reviewed study. Good thing I try things without needing one :).

Lunacie
09-12-11, 07:33 AM
Currently research is showing that medication plus therapy together provide
the best benefit for those with ADHD. If people want to try other things,
that's great and I haven't seen anyone here say they shouldn't.

The problem comes when they claim they've found a "cure" and get huffy
because others aren't willing to go the same route.

I've had amazing results from taking Omega 3 fish oil supplements.


But I don't say I'm "cured" because I know if I stop taking it I'll be just as
foggy brained as before within a week or less. That makes it a 'treatment'
not a 'cure.'

I don't assume that everyone else will have the same benefits.

I don't "guilt" anyone who isn't willing to give this supplement a try.

sarahsweets
09-12-11, 07:46 AM
Cure implies that your adhd is gone.

champ886
09-12-11, 08:43 AM
Cure implies that your adhd is gone.

It is

no symptoms, no drugs, im "normal"

Period

I dont consume anything that has anything to do with my ADD

champ886
09-12-11, 09:06 AM
Currently research is showing that medication plus therapy together provide
the best benefit for those with ADHD. If people want to try other things,
that's great and I haven't seen anyone here say they shouldn't.

The problem comes when they claim they've found a "cure" and get huffy
because others aren't willing to go the same route.

I've had amazing results from taking Omega 3 fish oil supplements.


But I don't say I'm "cured" because I know if I stop taking it I'll be just as
foggy brained as before within a week or less. That makes it a 'treatment'
not a 'cure.'

I don't assume that everyone else will have the same benefits.

I don't "guilt" anyone who isn't willing to give this supplement a try.



its all in your brain i wasnt huffy at all

i was only dissapointed when people said i was wrong or didnt really have ADD. its fine to disagree with me, but it was the forum members that came at ME, not vice versa.

reread the thread lol

i just wanted to share my store and was hoping that somewhere, someone might be inspired. I never intended for people to do the same route nor did I get huffy.

wow

never assumed that others would have the same benefits. i didnt know what benefits i would have beforehand. no one told me, ok, sir, this will work well with your body.

gosh you cant even share things without people taking it offensively as a personal insult.

i regret even coming here to share but since the legend dude got some benefit whatever it's cool

bye

NOW I'm "huffy" because I've been accused of something I didn't do



some ppl here need to take a chill pill lol no pun intended


continuing this discussion is now worthless I've said what I wanted to be written on the internet and somewhere it may help someone so there it is.

you know for a while I never told my story but I went on a radio show to speak about what I've felt and the hold really urged me to be less selfish about it. she urged me to go to my old doctor and tell what I felt. To let people know, because you never know who you can help. I have always been relatively "selfish" about my health, meaning not really willing to share. This makes me want to go back to being that way. Now I'm being "huffy" because if there is anything that I don't like it's people accusing me of stuff I haven't done.

Good day people

btw I haven't had foggy brain in years, aside from when i started to eat highly processed foods and no fruits or vegetables for over a week at a time.

Lunacie
09-12-11, 09:19 AM
You know, this is a written medium so "tone" isn't always clear. Maybe
earlier in the thread you weren't being huffy, but you sure are now.

From my perspective, it seemed you were huffy because you didn't get
a bunch of responses saying things like "Wow, that sounds brilliant!"

What you got was people who have been reading about ADHD for years
and have not seen any research indicating that diet can "cure ADHD."
It's great that it seems to be working for you - but we can't extrapolate
from just one case that it could cure anyone else.

sarahsweets
09-12-11, 09:20 AM
I never thought you were huffy it's just that there is no cure for adhd. Symptom relief? Yes. Better quality of life? For sure. Cure? Nope.

qanda
09-12-11, 04:30 PM
I can see how someone who eliminates an element in their life that causes a negative might say they are cured. I might be "cured" of diabetes by losing weight or cured of high cholesterol by eliminating certain foods. Should I still say I'm diabetic when I'm skinny because I know gaining weight will bring it back? Do I still say I have high cholesterol because if I start eating cheese again my cholesterol goes up? I say no.
I think a lot of negativity came to a poster because of a mistake or misunderstanding or disagreement over one word, when the main point was how excited the person was to feel better & they wanted to share how they did it.
Some replied that they ate healthy and weren't "cured" like the poster was. The question is, is your diet exactly the same? Also, as one study showed, everyone seems to react to different foods, so one diet plan may not work for everyone.

fallegend
09-13-11, 09:24 AM
Do not eat bananas, eat a lot of feel bad today.

Lunacie
09-13-11, 10:30 AM
I can see how someone who eliminates an element in their life that causes a negative might say they are cured. I might be "cured" of diabetes by losing weight or cured of high cholesterol by eliminating certain foods. Should I still say I'm diabetic when I'm skinny because I know gaining weight will bring it back? Do I still say I have high cholesterol because if I start eating cheese again my cholesterol goes up? I say no.
I think a lot of negativity came to a poster because of a mistake or misunderstanding or disagreement over one word, when the main point was how excited the person was to feel better & they wanted to share how they did it.
Some replied that they ate healthy and weren't "cured" like the poster was. The question is, is your diet exactly the same? Also, as one study showed, everyone seems to react to different foods, so one diet plan may not work for everyone.

What many of us have been saying is that research shows that changes
in diet do not cure ADHD. They may improve a condition that looks-like
ADHD, but ADHD cannot be cured by diet changes.

I think it's awesome that the OP was willing to work through an elimination
diet to figure out what was causing his ADHD-LIKE problems, and it's
possible that a small percentage of those who have been diagnosed with
ADHD would benefit from doing the same thing.

But the bottom line is that changes in diet do not cure ADHD. And it's
important that those who read this forum know that.

Lunacie
09-13-11, 07:34 PM
I just read this interesting report on a study done in Belgium and the
Netherlands to look at the effect of an elimination diet on ADHD in
100 kids. The comments following the article are also very interesting.



ADHD and Diet: Parsing the Recent Research

April 19, 2011 in ADHD and Health (http://adhdrollercoaster.org/category/adhd-and-health/), ADHD in the News (http://adhdrollercoaster.org/category/adhd-in-the-news/), science of ADHD (http://adhdrollercoaster.org/category/science-of-adhd/), The Basics (http://adhdrollercoaster.org/category/the-basics/) by Gina Pera (http://adhdrollercoaster.org/author/admin/)

We've seen the headlines and read the stories regarding a recent study on ADHD and diet. But what is the real story behind the research? You'll find out below. But first, a brief examination of the situation.
...read more here ...
http://adhdrollercoaster.org/the-basics/adhd-and-diet-parsing-the-recent-research/#more-2061

qanda
09-13-11, 07:35 PM
Some believe diet can not cure adhd and it's not real adhd if it does. While I would not bet my life savings that diet will work, I would also not bet my life savings that it does not. I'm waiting for more research to mimic or not mimic what was done in the two studies I mentioned to make my decision.

Lots of treatments work for a few but not the multitudes but that does not mean that they do not have the ailment. My friend had stage 4 cancer, basically given a death sentence, but the chemo worked for her for some reason when for most with her cancer it does not. So are you saying she did not really have cancer?

I would respect a response that said most studies show diet does not work, but a few show it does. Those are the facts, not opinion.

Lunacie
09-14-11, 08:44 AM
Some believe diet can not cure adhd and it's not real adhd if it does. While I would not bet my life savings that diet will work, I would also not bet my life savings that it does not. I'm waiting for more research to mimic or not mimic what was done in the two studies I mentioned to make my decision.

Lots of treatments work for a few but not the multitudes but that does not mean that they do not have the ailment. My friend had stage 4 cancer, basically given a death sentence, but the chemo worked for her for some reason when for most with her cancer it does not. So are you saying she did not really have cancer?

I would respect a response that said most studies show diet does not work, but a few show it does. Those are the facts, not opinion.

The study I linked just previous to your post shows that diet does help
some people with ADHD-like symptoms, but the general concensus among
scientists and researchers is that the symptoms were caused by allergies.

pechemignonne
09-14-11, 08:55 AM
I think that this person's comments (emphasis mine) sum things up nicely. If diet interventions do work at all, which is not clear, they would only be part of an overall symptom-reduction strategy, and not a cure, certainly not for the vast majority.


As for diet and ADHD, I personally find that a whole foods diet is a critical part of managing my symptoms. It is not a cure. For that matter, neither are meds, or exercise, or sleep hygiene, or the organizational skills I’ve learned. All of those things taken together are not a cure — they are symptom management.

The kind of elimination diet described in the article is a lot of work, and something a lot of older kids are simply not going to comply with. At the end of the day it is not a “cure” — it manages symptoms. Even in the cases where it “works”, it can’t be the only tool in the ADHD toolbox.
<!-- /comment content -->

Lunacie
09-14-11, 10:09 AM
I think that this person's comments (emphasis mine) sum things up nicely. If diet interventions do work at all, which is not clear, they would only be part of an overall symptom-reduction strategy, and not a cure, certainly not for the vast majority.

I would have bolded the part about how difficult it would be to get older
kids to go along with such a diet. That's something that was mentioned
in the link I shared - that the diet was tried with kids 4 to 8 years old and
with older kids it might be a lot more difficult to conduct such research.

pechemignonne
09-14-11, 10:13 AM
Yeah, I know that I would have a lot of trouble following such a diet- or any diet, for that matter. Food is an area where my impulsivity is *very* obvious. For example, I am world's worst lactose intolerant. It gives me terrible stomach pains and indigestion to eat dairy. But that will be hours from now, so if you offer me a piece of cheesecake or lasagna, I will *not* say no.

mctavish23
09-14-11, 10:56 AM
I'd bet my life savings on the research (and ask for decent odds),because I'd win.

Living a healthier life style is good for everyone,so in that sense, we're all on the

same page.

A neurodevelopmental pediatrician I had the pleasure of seeing about 8-10 yrs ago,

said that nutritional supplements couldn't make their way into the Mesocortical Path-

-way, which is the "route" Dopamine takes to travel throughout the brain.

Astute FORUM members did correct me,however,several years back on nutrients be-

-ng able to cross the Blood Brain Barrier, which I believe she'd said they couldn't.

However, the mistake could have been mine.

Either way, she was emphatic about their not being able to impact Dopamine, due to

not being able to access the Mesocortical Pathway.

I still take Omega's and this AM will be seeing my pcp.

He's a holisitic practitioner from England,with an interest in Autism.

Suffice to say, we have some fun conversations.

tc

mctavish23

(Robert)

SweetCode
09-14-11, 12:44 PM
I've done a quick search for studies that analyses the effects of diet on ADHD and they did have success over the control group , so they conclusion was that sometimes ADHD was induced by diet in some cases.
http://aapgrandrounds.aappublications.org/content/25/6/61.full
http://jad.sagepub.com/content/3/1/30.short

in that last one conclusions are really extensive see

Results: Twenty-three alternate Tx were identified, ranging in scientific documentation from discrediting controlled studies through mere hypotheses to positive controlled double-blind clinical trials. Many of them are applicable only to a restricted etiological subgroup. The oligoantigenic or few-foods diet has convincing double-blind evidence of efficacy in multiple trials for a properly selected subgroup. Enzymepotentiated desensitization to foods, relaxation/EMG biofeedback, and deleading also have controlled evidence of efficacy. Glyconutritional supplementation, iron supplementation, magnesium supplementation, Chinese herbals, EEG biofeedback, meditation, mirror feedback, channel-specific perceptual training, and vestibular stimulation all have promising prospective pilot data. Single-vitamin megadosage has some intriguing pilot trial data. Zinc supplementation is hypothetically supported by systematic case-control data but has no systematic clinical trial. Laser acupuncture has promising unpublished pilot data. Essential fatty acid supplementation has promising systematic case-control data but clinical trials are equivocal. Recommended-Daily-Allowance vitamin supplementation, nonChinese herbals, homeopathic remedies, and antifungal therapy have no systematic data in ADHD. Megadose multivitamin combinations are probably ineffective for most patients and possibly dangerous. Simple sugar restriction and hypnosis seem ineffective. Amino acid supplementation, though mildly effective in the short term, is not effective beyond a few weeks. Thyroid Tx is effective in the presence of documented thyroid abnormality, but not otherwise.

Conclusion: Some alternate Tx of ADHD are effective or probably effective, but mainly for restricted etiologic subgroups. In some cases they are the Tx of choice, and initial evaluation should consider the relevant etiologies. A few have failed to prove effective in controlled trials. Most need research to determine whether they are effective and/or to define the applicable subgroup. Some of them, though not safer than standard Tx, may be preferable for an etiologic subgroup.

Kaimei
09-14-11, 09:27 PM
I'm mixing your quoted posts up a bit, qanda, because there are two similiar themes I wanted to reply to.

I can see how someone who eliminates an element in their life that causes a negative might say they are cured. I might be "cured" of diabetes by losing weight or cured of high cholesterol by eliminating certain foods. Should I still say I'm diabetic when I'm skinny because I know gaining weight will bring it back? Do I still say I have high cholesterol because if I start eating cheese again my cholesterol goes up? I say no.

and

Lots of treatments work for a few but not the multitudes but that does not mean that they do not have the ailment. My friend had stage 4 cancer, basically given a death sentence, but the chemo worked for her for some reason when for most with her cancer it does not. So are you saying she did not really have cancer?

A cure has a finite period, and once it is applied for the required amount of time, it can be stopped without any subsequent resumption of the disease/disorder/symptoms. So yes, your friend had cancer, and yes, the chemo worked for her. However, chemotherapy is not a cure, it is a therapy. The cancer is in remission; if it ever resurfaces, she will be diagnosed as relapsed, not as a new cancer patient.

Even if you're not taking any medication for something, if you are using any ongoing method of controlling it that requires active maintenance, you're not cured. You may not be suffering, but if you ever stop, you will be. A cure means you can walk away and never, ever think about it again.

Let me put it this way - if you have to be admitted into the hospital, and you have to tell your doctors about it for safety, your method isn't a cure. If a change in your routine, exposure to certain elements you've eliminated, or the wrong medicine could endanger your life or affect your treatment, your method isn't a cure.

You don't go into the hospital and tell them about the cold you had last year, because you took a round of antibiotics and cured it - it's no longer a factor. You sure as heck DO tell them that you're diabetic, even if you haven't needed to take insulin for 10 years because you changed your diet, and your friend will definitely tell them she had cancer, even if her chemotherapy ended twenty years ago, because it's a factor in managing her health.

I had ITP as a child, but I haven't had to do anything to treat it in almost thirty years. Days, months, years go by without thinking about it. However, I am still considered immuno-compromised, and I still actively avoid the things that can trigger a relapse, like aspirin. I am in remission; avoiding aspirin is active management. I have to remain alert to anything that could potentially compromise my health.

I also have endometriosis, which is chronic, can be debilitating, and nobody knows what causes it or how to prevent it. However, six years ago I had a hysterectomy, resulting in a complete cessation of symptoms. But I don't tell people it cured me - I say it doesn't cause me any problems.


I think a lot of negativity came to a poster because of a mistake or misunderstanding or disagreement over one word, when the main point was how excited the person was to feel better & they wanted to share how they did it.

I agree with you wholeheartedly on this one - if I found something that worked for me the way he (?) did, I'd be thrilled, and I'd be all over this board with every detail, encouraging those who were interested in trying it. If Sarahsweets came on here and said she finally got a grip on her ADHD by doing three somersaults and a cartwheel before every meal and now she's doing GREAT, I'd be thrilled for her, and I'd probably spend about two weeks doing somersaults and a cartwheel before I set the table. If it worked, I'd think it was superior to the need to take medications for multiple reasons. I'd be happy for her and anyone else it worked for, and I'd expect people to be happy if it worked for me.

Sharing the things that work and don't work - and hopefully giving or gaining insight as to why - is a major part of why many of us come to this board.

As much as it might seem like nitpicking over semantics, though, what the OP repeatedly ignored was not just the currently known facts about ADHD, but also the pain that the word "cure" can cause people who have an incurable or unalterable condition. It's holding out a prize you can never, ever be certain of winning.

When you've been suffering your entire life because of a condition, you've probably been through the wringer when it comes to trying to improve things. That's f$@#ing exhausting - mentally, physically, emotionally. For you, your family, your friends - everyone around you. Each new treatment, each new option brings with it a surge of hope that this time, this thing, this pill, this diet, this vitamin will be the thing that finally - FINALLY! - gives you a way to drag yourself out of the h*ll you've been living it.

And every pill, every diet, every vitamin that does nothing to help you - or worse, helps for just a brief time and then drops you on your **** again - every death of that new hope is crushing. The pain, anger, and bitterness comes back, doubled. Every new hope that dies makes the next one seem a little dimmer, and a little dimmer, and a little dimmer, until you can't see so much as a glimmer anymore.

Do you see where I'm coming from with this? It might seem a little excessive and dramatic, but there aren't enough words to describe the emotional process people go through when that happens.

Your friend, with cancer - while she was going through the long, excruciating chemotherapy process and thinking please, let it work this time! - how do you think she would have felt if someone had come skipping through the cancer treatment center - bouncy, skin flushed with health, good weight, full head of hair - beaming at everyone and saying -

"Look, I cured my cancer and I didn't even NEED to go through chemotherapy! All I did was eat salad and NOW I'M TOTALLY CURED AND I NEVER EVER HAVE TO LIVE IN FEAR AND PAIN AGAIN!"

How, exactly, do you think your friend would feel? Especially if she'd lived on nothing BUT salad for two years after she was diagnosed? And the woman in the bed beside her who was a life-long vegan? The parents of the children in chemotherapy who had done their utmost to give their child the best and healthiest of everything but still had to resort to chemo? How long do you think it would take for families of cancer patients to yank the 'cured' person into the alley behind the hospital and temporarily 'cure' their pain and frustration?

Now, if someone came into the hospital happy, healthy, etc., and told your friend, "I was also diagnosed with cancer, but I've learned to improve my life, and this is how. I found that cutting red meat out of my diet helped this way, and adding more raw vegetables helped like this..."

Telling people on this board that there's a "cure" is a slap in the face to people who have already had more than their fair share of slaps.

Telling people on this board that you've found a way to significantly improve your life and health will get you listened to, encouraged; people will be interested, they will want to what, they will want to learn how, and they will think about whether it's a good option for them. Anything that any of us has found that makes our lives a little better is shared here - even though we know it probably won't work for all of us, we all get a bit of a boost when someone shares their successes. We share realistic support here, not once-in-a-million, dream-of-a-lifetime fantasies.

If I come off sounding bitter, it's because I am. I don't want to belittle anyone's success, but I don't want my face rubbed in something I know I cannot have. My life has improved greatly just recently, and I'm happier now than I've been in a long time. I have a lot of realistic hope about my future, but I could live to be 200 years old and the first 34 years of my life would STILL hurt.

OK, I'm done now. I've temporarily exhausted my grievance over the word "cure," and I know I've certainly gone past a lot of people's ability to read. This has probably been one of the most emotionally exhausting posts I've ever written...

whatsthebuzz
09-14-11, 10:14 PM
.

OK, I'm done now. I've temporarily exhausted my grievance over the word "cure," and I know I've certainly gone past a lot of people's ability to read. This has probably been one of the most emotionally exhausting posts I've ever written...

Emotionally exhausting it may be..but nonetheless one of the most awesome posts I've ever come across in this forum. Damn I wish I could write like you . You're practically a spokesperson for all the pain and anguish all of us go through and I really appreciate you making clear what that feels like and means because some of us , like me, find difficulty putting such feelings into words. The fact that my clouded mind has been made even more clouded by what I've been through doesn't help much either. There hasn't really been a single week that goes by that I don't think about what my ADD has done to me , my family and my life in general. I had dreams...I still have dreams actually..but each time I try to follow through each time I'm reminded of how much I've lost in the past and how much that evidently will cost my future.

Despite the cute and quirky behaviors that accompany us ADHDers , when it all comes down to it I don't think any of us would pass up the opportunity to be 'normal'. Who the hell wants to have a condition, any condition that to be managed for the rest of your life. Im pretty sure that if 'he' had not taken the drug route and let the adhd impact his life til at long last he had a later diagnosis he would be singing an entirely different tune. One unfortunely that would be all too familiar.

lateralthinker
09-14-11, 10:48 PM
If you read my posts from a couple years ago - I tried the diet thing and had it well managed. Briefly. Fish Oil certainly helped. Saint John's Wort lifted some depression. Vitamins certainly didn't hurt. I made a concious effort to eat healthier and exercise. A 2 1/2 years later, a fifteen month old, and a house later... back to where I started. Why didn't I keep up with that? I have to struggle to remember to take those supplements in the morning and a good diet and exercise take discipline. A baby and a house are come with... distractions. Why do I lack the memory, discipline, and get distracted to the point I can't manage it any further without further intervention?

Because I have ADHD. And, yes, I fooled myself into thinking I was or could be cured.

My wife tries hard to deal with the frustrations that arise, I struggle and as much as I wanted the whole diet thing to work - it may - but it certainly can't sustain through life's ups and downs. I finally got my diagnosis and a prescription yesterday and I'm hoping it will be the start of rewarding and sustained improvement. The meds are merely a start to many other things I will need to follow up on. Like a good diet.

Champ, I will admit (I'll give you the benefit of the doubt that you simply didn't have a food allergy), that a good diet goes a long way. High amounts of sugar, fat, and alcohol can worsen ADD symptoms. Or you can simply perform better under certain pressures - there have been times in my life where a certain stress level allows me to function at an almost "normal" level; I excelled in parts of my education that had a high dropout/failure rate - not as good when it was easy.

If you have it you're definitely not "cured"; you just have a treatment plan that's currently allowing you to manage it well. How long it will last is a great unknown; could all end tomorrow or ten years from now. The ADD is waiting right there for a window of opportunity to open. It comes in the form of procrastination, distraction, the smallest lack of discipline, and life's ups, downs, and changes. It could even come in the form of ineffective medication or one that simply stopped working. But it's there, fidgeting and squirming, and waiting to wreak havoc and disarray on us and those around us.

TheJaredwhat
09-14-11, 10:53 PM
Pretty awesome post!

I just started taking Adderall myself and am not sure where I'm going to go with it. But hey, this is all the more reason to go vegan again :)

Lunacie
09-15-11, 09:25 AM
Just want to say "THANKS" to Kaimei and Lateral Thinker for explaining so
well how bragging about a "cure" feels to those of us who struggle just to
remember to take meds or supplements ... or a shower ... :o

qanda
09-15-11, 03:11 PM
lateralthinker - I can see your point.

Just as you have suffered, so has my family. And because of that I am passionate in my belief about alternatives. I have read responses that basically tell people that they should not try alternatives because the research has not proved them effective. This is a GREAT disservice, as I have first hand seen the difference a vitamin has made in my daughter. I cried many nights, went to work with my stomach in a knot, all because my daughter was suffering from a mood disorder. Watch your 7 yr old rage, beg you to help her, cry at night from depression and you will understand my pain. I won't begin to guess which is worse, but believe me, a mood disorder is no picnic.

You may wonder why I am on this site - it is because she was originally diagnosed with adhd.

I always appreciated responses that warned alternatives are not tested for safety, but NOT the advice that we should only try things that have been proven by research to work. Why, because the research on the vitamin my daughter takes has no double blind studies. The main reason I tried it was because parents like me found it to work.

Today, my mornings are peaceful and I have not cried worrying for my daughter in a long time. For now, things are good and I have parents who found something that worked and shared their experiences to thank. I am very research driven in my approach to finding a solution, but also believe there is lots yet to be discovered.

It seems our own personal experiences shape our beliefs, so I will try to be more mindful of that in the future.

sarahsweets
09-15-11, 03:27 PM
Who told you not to try alternative treatments?

fallegend
09-15-11, 07:31 PM
Low protein intake, pure starch food, sleep deprivation, the complete elimination of attention deficit.

qanda
09-15-11, 10:47 PM
Sarahsweets - these are some of the comments I've read about alternative treatments:

In regards to supplements treating Adhd - THEY DON'T WORK.

Supplements don't impact the treatment of Adhd.

Bipolar disorder with a non-conventional treatment are frauds selling snake oil and preying on the vulnerbilities of disabled people.

And perhaps the most insulting of all: Alternative treatments are equivalent to using your child as a lab rat.

So for me, these statements are telling me not to use alternatives. You can interpret them as you choose.

sarahsweets
09-16-11, 05:59 AM
I really think it boils down to the word cure because there is no cure for adhd. I use melatonin for sleep. Plenty of people argue that its dangerous or has no proof that it works. It works for me but I wouldn't say my insomnia is cured because when I dont use it it comes back eventually. I choose melatonin over other sleeping pills because I dont want to develop a tolerance to sleeping meds. I do have some back up sleeping meds for really bad nights but the natural route for this works better for me. If I took st johns wort for depression I also wouldn't use the word cure I would say my moods are stable or in control.

DrZoidberg
09-16-11, 07:02 AM
I disagree. When I became a raw foodist I no longer treated the food allergies. I eat alllll the things I was "allergic" too, a LOT of them. Only the rotation diet confronted food allergies.

Even now I have the physical symptoms of food allergies when i eat q lot of things.

But the ADD is gone. I'm not alone in having this happen.

It's been an amazing last 3 years and I just want to share it with everyone.

It's just the placebo effect. There's nothing especially healthy about the raw food diet. Our digestive tracts aren't very well adapted to eating raw foods. But we are very well adapted to prolonged starvation. We can last and function quite well with rather severe maladaptive diets. It might take years, but eventually your diet will catch up with you.

We need plenty of raw foods and fibres. But once you take the shift to entirely raw foods you lose out all that stuff that you need from cooked food.

Lunacie
09-16-11, 08:45 AM
Sarahsweets - these are some of the comments I've read about alternative treatments:

In regards to supplements treating Adhd - THEY DON'T WORK.

Supplements don't impact the treatment of Adhd.

Bipolar disorder with a non-conventional treatment are frauds selling snake oil and preying on the vulnerbilities of disabled people.

And perhaps the most insulting of all: Alternative treatments are equivalent to using your child as a lab rat.

So for me, these statements are telling me not to use alternatives. You can interpret them as you choose.

When I joined this forum I wasn't convinced that meds were all that great
and it seemed like all I saw were posts saying "meds are the only thing
that works." As my granddaughter got older, and the struggles only got
worse for her and the whole family, we finally gave in and gave meds a
try.

Nothing we tried before worked. Meds work. Maybe we were using
my granddaughter as a lab rat to see what worked for her - everyone
reacts to treatments differently so in the end that's how it tends to play
out for everyone with ADHD ... lab rats and experiments and personal
research.


For me, Omega 3 fish oil supplements work. They don't cause problems
with blood pressure like stimulant meds can, so I haven't tried stimulants
and I don't know if they would work better than the fish oil.


Every post you read on this forum is an opinion. Some opinions are backed
by research and some are only based on anecdotal evidence from just one
person.

In my case, both the research and my own anecdotal evidence says that
the meds work (80% of the time) and supplements also work (very small
statistic). But others can draw their own conclusions from what they read
here and so can you.

lateralthinker
09-16-11, 01:44 PM
I think the only wrong presumptions one can make is that 1) that ADHD can be cured (though I'd like to own shares in whatever company comes up with a cure or vaccine someday) and 2)there is no single tried and true method for treating it.

Some people may not need meds - their life's situation may allow for not needing them or they simply may cause worse side effects than the ADHD. Some respond well to medications, but they'll still work on borrowed time unless other forms of treatment, diet, and other lifestyle allowances are made.

I've been taking fish oil and Saint John's Wort for a while and both stabilized things a little for a while. A 15 month-old and a new house later - I'm moving up to meds: responsibilities overcame my ability to manage. I just started yesterday. But I still intend to keep up with my supplements, watch the diet, and eventually seek therapy. None of these will work alone and if I were to do even more, I still wouldn't be cured.

If Champ is having good luck with a raw diet he should stick to it. If Omega-3s work for Lunacie, he should stick to those. As long as they understand that they may not always work and that neither are a cure, they have a successful treatment plan.

Lunacie
09-16-11, 02:32 PM
I think the only wrong presumptions one can make is that 1) that ADHD can be cured (though I'd like to own shares in whatever company comes up with a cure or vaccine someday) and 2)there is no single tried and true method for treating it.

Some people may not need meds - their life's situation may allow for not needing them or they simply may cause worse side effects than the ADHD. Some respond well to medications, but they'll still work on borrowed time unless other forms of treatment, diet, and other lifestyle allowances are made.

I've been taking fish oil and Saint John's Wort for a while and both stabilized things a little for a while. A 15 month-old and a new house later - I'm moving up to meds: responsibilities overcame my ability to manage. I just started yesterday. But I still intend to keep up with my supplements, watch the diet, and eventually seek therapy. None of these will work alone and if I were to do even more, I still wouldn't be cured.

If Champ is having good luck with a raw diet he should stick to it. If Omega-3s work for Lunacie, he should stick to those. As long as they understand that they may not always work and that neither are a cure, they have a successful treatment plan.

;) Lunacie is a She.

That's been my point all along in this thread. There is no "cure", there is
only treatment, and everyone responds to these treatments differently.
My granddaughter tried the fish oil and we weren't seeing any benefits,
some meds help her without horrible side effects, another med had such
awful side effects that it didn't matter whether it helped with focus or
not. She reacts to everything she tries differently, and she reacts
differently than her gramma does as well.

pechemignonne
09-16-11, 02:53 PM
I really, really don't think anyone should be on a raw food diet. It's just not healthy. See Dr. Zoidberg's post above.

There's nothing wrong with eating a lot of fresh fruits and vegetables. But only raw fruits and vegetables is dangerous and will lead to nutritional deficiency.

Candlewax
10-30-11, 12:28 PM
I don't get it, why is everyone being so skeptical. this guy made some huge improvements in his life and wants other people to know about it, so that they might benefit too.

some arguments given are:

1) it's not scientifically proven that diet works

well, it worked for him didn't it? so if you're having the same problems, you can be skeptical or you can just think 'hey, it might work for me too' and try it. Going vegan is quite dramatic, but I'd say if it will really make a big impact, it's worth it. and if it doesn't work for you, at least you tried and now you know.

2) he probably didn't have ADHD to begin with

ADHD is diagnosed, like most, if not all psychiatric disorders, by symptoms. the underlying cause is unknown. if he met the criteria from DSM-IV, then he had ADHD. ADHD might have a great variety of causes, but so far these are not yet known. If none of the underlying causes are known, it's impossible to say which one is 'real' ADHD and which one 'mimics' ADHD.

and even if it's true that he doesn't have 'real' ADHD, his post is still valueable, because likely there are people on this board who have the same 'mime' ADHD, and they will benefit from the advice.

Of course you can't make bold assumptions that everyone will be forever cured from ADHD if the go vegan. but that's not what OP was saying, he was just giving his own personal story so that other people might benefit from it. I don't understand why this is met with hostility and skepticism.

pechemignonne
10-30-11, 03:03 PM
I don't understand why this is met with hostility and skepticism.
http://www.addforums.com/forums/showpost.php?p=1171049&postcount=73

mctavish23
10-30-11, 09:20 PM
As someone with severe ADHD-Combined Type, who also diagnoses

and treats it for a living, I spent the last 25+ years reading and studying

the peer reviewed research on the science behind the disorder.

In the last 8 + years, I've taken my study to another level of intensity,

in terms of increasing my expertise.

My reaction is based entirely on the research behind the disorder; all of

which says there's NO DAMN CURE.

That's why I personally & professionally view this as total BS;which it is.

Hope that helps.

tc

mctavish23

(Robert)

rickymooston
10-30-11, 11:18 PM
Agree, it can't be cured but I'm suspicious that fish or omega-3 might help me sometimes some what.

Raw food? Doesn't sound right.

A neuroscientist i talked to was a bit skeptical about omega 3; its shown to work in young kids. I'm not sure but salmon makes me feel better sometimes. At worst, I just like it.

Lunacie
10-31-11, 10:50 AM
Agree, it can't be cured but I'm suspicious that fish or omega-3 might help me sometimes some what.

Raw food? Doesn't sound right.

A neuroscientist i talked to was a bit skeptical about omega 3; its shown to work in young kids. I'm not sure but salmon makes me feel better sometimes. At worst, I just like it.

Omega 3 does help me, but it's not a cure. If I skip even two days I find
myself with brain fog again. It doesn't work for everyone of course. None
of the meds that have been developed for ADHD work for everyone. That's
why they keep trying new combinations as there are still about 30% who
haven't found any meds to be helpful. Maybe those people should try
Omega 3?

Monkey Bean
11-01-11, 03:36 PM
I would agree that diet could be the "cure" to a variety of physical maladies -- heart disease, diabetes, obesity, for instance, but ADHD? No, not really. There are probably certain dietary additions or deletions that could improve a person's mental state. There is no denying a diet rife with processed grains, sugars, meats and fats is BAD. Anyone would be foggy-headed on a fast-food diet, for instance.

Like the OP, all I have to go on is personal experience, but my personal experience is much different. My ADD doesn't stem from food allergies. I have tried a raw diet, an all veggie and nuts diet, a vegan diet. I'm still primarily vegetarian, eat almost no dairy, and eat meat and fish maybe twice a month. Eliminating dairy helped tons with my environmental allergies. I take Omega 3 for good measure. However, when I was at the peak of a raw, veggie diet, losing weight, health just oozing out of my pores, I quit caffeine. Quitting caff was pre-meds. And mentally, I pretty much fell off a cliff. I had all sorts of vital energy and no place to direct it. I was an unfocussed, cluttered mess. I tried to add better supplements to my diet, ramp up the quality of the food, be more committed, exercise regularly...and it just didn't work. Going through caffeine withdrawal was a fairly horrible experience to boot. And, you know, I didn't beat myself up that I couldn't "fix" myself through diet or discipline. I didn't feel down that I need drugs to function better. I just took it for what it was -- that we're not all stamped out of cookie cutters and I can only do what works for me (and by researching what everybody else does, of course!)

If it weren't for my spouse, I would pretty much be eating only fast food and leaving the grocery store with nothing but microwaveable appetizers. So, I'm incredibly thankful to have someone that loves to cook and helps keep me healthy.

Abi
11-01-11, 03:38 PM
I cured myself of AIDS by eating only watermelons for a year.

tudorose
11-01-11, 08:17 PM
I cured myself of AIDS by eating only watermelons for a year.

Yep. And with one sentence Abi sums up 7 pages worth of responses!

rickymooston
11-01-11, 09:06 PM
Monkey Bean, there is no actual "cure" for ADHD and while some relationship to omega 3 can exist, its apparently genetic not environmental. (Eating salmon makes me feel good and I just had one. Whether that's gourmet taste or ADHD I don't know).

On the bright side, people manage it and/or adopt to in different ways. This depends on several factors: how serious their individual symptoms are and personal philosophy.

Like many people with ADHD, my life is not fully managed. In essence, I "cheat" and do what I have to avoid drowning. My problem is mostly one of organization but have some with focus as well. I can manage the focus problems with caffiene, some heuristic tools but the organization thing has been kiling me for a long time. I may take medication in the future; unsure.

:D

mctavish23
11-05-11, 01:14 AM
The OP hasn't returned since 10/06/11.

My (personal) take is that he dropped

his attention seeking "bomb" and split.

tc

mctavish23

(Robert)

fallegend
12-14-11, 01:58 AM
New discovery, chicken is no problem.
Chicken is a good friend of ADHD.

pechemignonne
12-14-11, 06:55 PM
^^ Not true! Chickens are terrible friends.

All they care about it social climbing and grain-pecking.

And they *never* call.

unixdr1
10-10-13, 12:49 AM
I cured myself of AIDS by eating only watermelons for a year.
So a guy comes on and does his best to share what worked for him and you can do is take the ****?

What a bunch of intolerant people!

unixdr1
10-10-13, 12:50 AM
The OP hasn't returned since 10/06/11.

My (personal) take is that he dropped

his attention seeking "bomb" and split.

tc

mctavish23

(Robert)
Oh yes, because perish the thought that he might have actually been trying to help people out.

Not with you bunch of negative nellies!

unixdr1
10-10-13, 12:54 AM
Well this thread has been a tremendous learning experience for me.

If you want to fit in on the addforums: never mention anything positive that worked for you and **** all over anyone who does.

I can see the "culture" of this place, and it's not about trying to make a positive difference.

Anyway enjoy your sarcasm and remember - always keep your minds closed to anything that could possibly be of any help.

Oh wait a sec, I don't really need to tell you that, do I?

Lunacie
10-10-13, 09:04 AM
Well this thread has been a tremendous learning experience for me.

If you want to fit in on the addforums: never mention anything positive that worked for you and **** all over anyone who does.

I can see the "culture" of this place, and it's not about trying to make a positive difference.

Anyway enjoy your sarcasm and remember - always keep your minds closed to anything that could possibly be of any help.

Oh wait a sec, I don't really need to tell you that, do I?

There's a big difference in saying "This helped me" and "This cured me so it will cure everyone."

There is no cure for ADHD at this time. There is nothing positive about giving false hope.
.

Stevuke79
10-10-13, 09:29 AM
We openly discuss and enthusiastically support the idea that when you have ADHD you have to be more careful and particular with your eating and exercise habits. By the way, I am a HUGE organic enthusiast and IMO as a society we all probably have no idea how poorly we are eating.

And pardon our sarcasm towards the OP, but there is no amount of organic soy that will reshape your prefrontal cortex.
(but improved brain chemistry though healthy living can partially ameliorate symptoms of the misshaped cortex.)

Researchlife
09-13-17, 05:49 PM
I've just come across this thread and I'm saddened by the lack of understanding many have about the impact of food on our mental wellbeing. This comes down to a lack of information provided to those at the front line trained in medicine.

As someone who is trained in this area and has spent years researching the mind, I can confirm that a serious change in diet can not only lessen symptoms but can also bring about what some may call a "cure" although this may suggest we are terminating something, when we are really strengthening.

We now know that our gut has many of the same chemicals as our brain, and not only does our brain communicate with our body, but our gut also communicates with our brain. This is incredibly important to understand as we now see this how this results in many problems with the mind.

Gluten, sugar and caffeine are the main food types that are suggested to avoid, but in reality the cleaner our diet is, the better our mind will function. Not to mention all the other improvements on other health problems.

There is plenty of research and lived experience to back this up. Please do research and speak with specialist trained in these areas. Someone trained in medicine can't be expected to know about research into food and mood which is a completely different and complex subject.

TheGreatKing
09-15-17, 07:36 PM
So a guy comes on and does his best to share what worked for him and you can do is take the ****?

What a bunch of intolerant people!

No need for name calling, i understand you frustration but why not Argue the point instead of resorting to a primitive way of communication.

I think that changing the way you eat can definitely benefit your life but unfortunately i doubt that it can reverse neurological disorders, can it reduce the effect of some symptoms of Adhd from the prior unhealthy diet you were eating, sure i believe that but can it make it all disappear, i haven't seen any credible evidence for this happening.

sarahsweets
09-16-17, 06:21 AM
I've just come across this thread and I'm saddened by the lack of understanding many have about the impact of food on our mental wellbeing. This comes down to a lack of information provided to those at the front line trained in medicine.
So you are saying that the conspiracy is medical professionals do not want to talk about the importance of eating well because it will cut into their business model? Or is there some other nefarious means behind it?

As someone who is trained in this area and has spent years researching the mind, I can confirm that a serious change in diet can not only lessen symptoms but can also bring about what some may call a "cure" although this may suggest we are terminating something, when we are really strengthening.

What is your training and where is this research?

We now know that our gut has many of the same chemicals as our brain, and not only does our brain communicate with our body, but our gut also communicates with our brain. This is incredibly important to understand as we now see this how this results in many problems with the mind.

Gluten, sugar and caffeine are the main food types that are suggested to avoid, but in reality the cleaner our diet is, the better our mind will function. Not to mention all the other improvements on other health problems.

I value the importance of eating well and how the right types of food can almost cure certain health conditions so I am not anti-food knowledge. I know I made some major changes on the advice of someone here and it drastically reduced the gut issues I have and I have lost weight, so I am not poo-pooing the importance. But if you are saying that diet can cure adhd than I call BS on that.

There is plenty of research and lived experience to back this up. Please do research and speak with specialist trained in these areas. Someone trained in medicine can't be expected to know about research into food and mood which is a completely different and complex subject.

No, share the research you have. You cant post about how it makes a difference and then tell us to do the research. You need to share what research you are talking about.

DeannaDuarte
09-20-17, 01:47 AM
I don't think so, because there is no cure for ADHD.

mildadhd
09-21-17, 09:09 AM
I wonder what the difference is between growing out of ADHD and curing ADHD?

According to Dr Barkley some people do grow out of ADHD.

It is possible the OP grew out of ADHD.

Can eating better and focusing on taking care of ourselves partially help some people to promote growth?









M

mildadhd
09-21-17, 10:24 AM
I've just come across this thread and I'm saddened by the lack of understanding many have about the impact of food on our mental wellbeing. This comes down to a lack of information provided to those at the front line trained in medicine.

As someone who is trained in this area and has spent years researching the mind, I can confirm that a serious change in diet can not only lessen symptoms but can also bring about what some may call a "cure" although this may suggest we are terminating something, when we are really strengthening.

We now know that our gut has many of the same chemicals as our brain, and not only does our brain communicate with our body, but our gut also communicates with our brain. This is incredibly important to understand as we now see this how this results in many problems with the mind.

Gluten, sugar and caffeine are the main food types that are suggested to avoid, but in reality the cleaner our diet is, the better our mind will function. Not to mention all the other improvements on other health problems.

There is plenty of research and lived experience to back this up. Please do research and speak with specialist trained in these areas. Someone trained in medicine can't be expected to know about research into food and mood which is a completely different and complex subject.

Thanks

There was a show on TV. (Sorry I have no idea what the TV show was titled)

Some scientists where searching forests for new plant species, to make new medicines.

They had a portable computer that analyzed the plant leaves, recorded information, could tell if the plant was a new species, and even some possible new medicinal purposes, based on the plants structure.

I think red beets saved my life. (Really helps reduce chronic inflammation, and also helps calm me down)



M

Talietje
11-08-17, 05:18 PM
I agree, food can cure ADD.

First of all we need to know what we are eating today. The food we eat, more about the western diet, is mostly processed, full of sugars,grains, gluten, additives,... And that cause inflamation in the body that triggers diseases like cognitive problems (Add, adhd, autism, dementia,..) I believe humans are not born to be ill.

If we go back in time and look at the diet of our grandparents from the prehistory, we see they eat everything found in nature; vegetables, fruits, nuts, eggs, fish, meat. There weren't processed foods at all. They were healthy and fit. Our genes are still used to the same diet, called Paleo.

The gut has a huge connection with the brain. And it produces 80 - 95% of neurotransmitter serotonin, that's a lot more according to the producing of brain itselves. It has been said; Our gut is the second brain.

Food is fuel for the brain and our brains function the best on a diet with healthy fats and not carbs.

For those who are interested, I recommend reading the book 'Grain brain' of neurologist David Perlmutter. He did scientific research about this subject.

I also recommend watching this TED talk https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iL4SD5f2toQ&t=19s
A girl cured her autism by cutting out gluten, casein and glutamine.

sarahsweets
11-09-17, 06:56 AM
I agree, food can cure ADD.
Using the word cure is lofty. There is no cure for adhd. There are many diseases claimed to be cured by diet and as far as I know they are not. Anything that claims to cure I immediately want to read thew science about. And usually people that claim diet can cure adhd rush to say that there is a conspiracy abound and that the scientific community doesnt want us peons to know that diet can cure it because they are in cohoots with Big Pharma to keep us all drugged.

First of all we need to know what we are eating today. The food we eat, more about the western diet, is mostly processed, full of sugars,grains, gluten, additives,... And that cause inflamation in the body that triggers diseases like cognitive problems (Add, adhd, autism, dementia,..) I believe humans are not born to be ill.

If we go back in time and look at the diet of our grandparents from the prehistory, we see they eat everything found in nature; vegetables, fruits, nuts, eggs, fish, meat. There weren't processed foods at all. They were healthy and fit. Our genes are still used to the same diet, called Paleo.

By that argument then we should all be eating a diet heavy in meat. I dont believe a diet heavy in meat is necessarily healthy for you, we all need balance.

The gut has a huge connection with the brain. And it produces 80 - 95% of neurotransmitter serotonin, that's a lot more according to the producing of brain itselves. It has been said; Our gut is the second brain.

Can you share some studies that say that serontonin is related to the gut?

Food is fuel for the brain and our brains function the best on a diet with healthy fats and not carbs.

I agree that food is fuel for the brain.

For those who are interested, I recommend reading the book 'Grain brain' of neurologist David Perlmutter. He did scientific research about this subject.

I also recommend watching this TED talk https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iL4SD5f2toQ&t=19s
A girl cured her autism by cutting out gluten, casein and glutamine.
And as far as I know this is still ancedotal. If her autism is truly cured then she didnt have it to begin with.

it isnt for me to say that diet cant help adhd. It didnt for me an most people but some people cant tolerate meds and have managed it with diet. Thats good for them. But anyone who claims that diet cured their adhd is someone I take issue with. Claiming a cure when there is not one is very misleading. Its like those hollistic doctors that claim they can cure cancer and patients die because they say no to chemo and try cupping and supplements or faith healing. Its dangerous and I dont take that sort of thing lightly. A cure is like saying something is eradicated. Meaning, it no longer poses a threat to society because we have found away to make it go away for good and not come back. You cant cure adhd and its irresponsible to say you can. It might sway a parent from meds for their child and it keeps people of all kinds from getting treatment.

peripatetic
11-09-17, 09:19 AM
There are many claims about food curing mental health issues and while a proper diet is always a good idea, I think it's misleading and possibly dangerous to claim diet can cure mental illness.

Unmanagable
11-09-17, 11:02 AM
Diet did NOT cure my adhd, but so far for the last two years and 8 months, I've been able to much better live with myself and my various overall symptoms by easing much of my other significant suffering through my overall consumption choices, internally and externally.

It was fascinating, to me, to learn that genes aren't the only things that run in families, so do the consumption habits/diets/traditions/etc., like we're on autopilot when it comes to that stuff based on what we were taught, not to mention based on our taste bud preferences and addictions.

While I've painfully learned it's very necessary to pay much closer attention to our consumption habits in order to have a healthy foundation to build upon, it certainly isn't the only thing necessary to keep some of my various symptoms more manageable. Other symptoms simply refuse to be managed, so I learned to try to work around them differently, and have been lucky, so far.

There's an additional long list of therapeutic methods I continue to practice daily, and as needed, in addition to drastically cleaning up my diet and environment. ADHD is only one of my issues that it seems to have helped with, though. It doesn't necessarily help the same exact way everyday...just like my symptoms aren't the exact same every day.

Many of my other diagnoses were chronic issues I was told I'd never find relief from and should just get used to it getting much worse with age, like IBS, "nervous stomach", ongoing respiratory stuff like allergies and frequent colds/flus/bronchitis, fibro, osteoarthritis, PTSD symptoms that were misdiagnosed and ignored for years, etc., etc. I was a frequent flyer in the docs office for many years seeking help and answers, yet I kept getting worse instead of better.

Yes, more mindful consumption has been and continues to be a huge help with my overall wellness, and has changed my life for the better in so many ways. No, it won't cure everything, or even anything, but it damn sure kicked my quality of life up many notches, and I'm good with that.

Much like with medications, it seems, there's no guarantees it's going to work based on your individual biological make-up. But as with meds, I would have never known the significant ill effects of the consumption habits I'd been mistakenly taught were necessary and safe had I not fully immersed myself into trying the alternatives.

I also encountered professionals who were anything but accurate in their assessments of what exactly my issues were, so the med trials ended up being equally, if not more harmful to me than living with all that stuff untreated had proven to be up until that point.

The diet change was what felt like my last and only hope for ANY relief, as I laid on the gurney in the ER with lots of time to think about it...and I was desperate...and it ended up surpassing my expectations, and then some, in bringing me overall life-improving relief.

My desperation had also led to having to resign from my f/t job of over 13 years, and we eventually moved to a new area surrounded by nature, free of many stressors that were weighing heavy on us, both of which also greatly helped lessen the overall stress I'd previously been living under that exacerbated my array of symptoms. Yet another significant factor in the grand scheme of my healing efforts.

I didn't feel I was ever going to get out of that painful hellish existence...until I also did a drastic diet and lifestyle change of what I ingest and use on and around my being...and have since maintained it rather strictly and continue to enjoy less suffering than what I had grown used to.

Having a supportive husband and healing practitioners willing to barter also makes it possible to have the strength and resources to even think about it. Without those two factors in my corner, I'd still not realize the benefits, I'm sure.

While I very much feel it saved my life in many ways, it equally complicated things in different ways, and I would never tell anyone it would definitely cure their ills, be it adhd or anything else.

But I definitely encourage folks to learn more about their own biology and to mindfully try it if they haven't yet every chance I get, for you never know what you may discover, be it significant relief or simply a firm confirmation on what not to do.

Lunacie
11-09-17, 11:11 AM
I agree, food can cure ADD.

First of all we need to know what we are eating today. The food we eat, more about the western diet, is mostly processed, full of sugars,grains, gluten, additives,... And that cause inflamation in the body that triggers diseases like cognitive problems (Add, adhd, autism, dementia,..) I believe humans are not born to be ill.

If we go back in time and look at the diet of our grandparents from the prehistory, we see they eat everything found in nature; vegetables, fruits, nuts, eggs, fish, meat. There weren't processed foods at all. They were healthy and fit. Our genes are still used to the same diet, called Paleo.

The gut has a huge connection with the brain. And it produces 80 - 95% of neurotransmitter serotonin, that's a lot more according to the producing of brain itselves. It has been said; Our gut is the second brain.

Food is fuel for the brain and our brains function the best on a diet with healthy fats and not carbs.

For those who are interested, I recommend reading the book 'Grain brain' of neurologist David Perlmutter. He did scientific research about this subject.



Really? Our ancestors with mental disorders either ended up as homeless
beggars or were locked away in the attic or the basement. Unless you were
part of a tribal culture where you were considered to be a special holy person.
They were not all healthy or mentally fit. Lovely picture, but totally not true.

Diet alone is not responsible for the changes in our guts. Antibiotics are just
one of the things I've seen theorized to be responsible for these gut changes.
This is why more meat suppliers are returning to natural antibiotics rather
than man-made ones.

Fraser_0762
11-09-17, 03:51 PM
Diet is important, that should never be understated. A healthier gut does equal a healthier mind and body. It doesn't "cure" disorders, it can however go a long way in helping to manage them and improve your over all sense of well being.

I should really take my own advice and improve my diet. But whenever I get the "lows" I just want to indulge in junk food, which I have no doubt has a knock on effect.