View Full Version : Methylin Different From Brand Ritalin


pharmacy boy
09-23-04, 11:09 AM
Just wondered if anyone has noticed a difference between Methylin and Ritalin i.e. Brand vs. Generic

Tara
09-23-04, 03:49 PM
Methlyn and Ritalin are both brand names forms of methylphenidate.

douglasb52
09-27-04, 04:52 PM
I've been taking methylin now for three months and I think they are almost identical. As a generic it is certainly a lot cheaper, which is important to me since I pay for it, not insurance. If you need to go generic this is the one to take if you want to be sure it's going to be the same as Ritalin.

Cesium0137
02-24-05, 05:42 PM
Im not sure if there is a difference in the effect that each drug has on the body, but there is some sort of chemical formulation difference because my pharmacy wont substitute methylin for ritalin without first contacting my doctor. Which is getting to be a real pain because every time I get a new perscription for ritalin walgreens has to talk to my doctor before I can get it filled. Walgreens will however substitute other brand name drugs for generics such as xanax for the generic alprazolam. Im not completely sure what that means, but it seems to me that methylin isnt a generic substitute, but another brand all together. Same ingredients, different formulation?

Gregster
02-24-05, 11:33 PM
Scrips for schedule II drugs have to be filled EXACTLY as written on the scrip - at least that's the way it is here in Ontario - and I think other places. On my first scrip the doctor made a simple mistake and I HAD to go back and get a new scrip - calling the doctor wasn't an option.

Cesium0137
02-25-05, 12:07 AM
It says substitutions are allowed on the perscription. Each time my doctor writes one for ritalin my pharmacy has to call him and have it changed to methylin, which has been about three times now. Other drugs have been substituted without a problem, such as xanax and some beta-blockers. I asked the pharmacist why they had to call again even though the perscription was the same as the previous one, and he replied that they arent allowed to substitute a medicine that has a different fomulation, even though the ingedients are the same.

e30mpower
03-08-05, 09:37 PM
Methylin is NOT a brand name drug.

And the pharmacist who elects to classify it as such, forcing a call to the doctor to get permission to substitute, needs some education. Once a drug loses patent protection, like Ritalin, it can never be rebranded by another drug company and sold in the SAME DOSAGE FORM. This is not to say that the Methylin Chewables aren't brand, because they may be considered as such, since no chewable form of methylphenidate was ever produced. The same goes for Concerta, although it's methylphenidate, it's a different formulation in a different dosage form (extended-release). But you can't produce another methylphenidate immediate-release tablet, intended for oral consumption, and introduce it as a patent drug.

Mallinkrodt (the people behind Methylin) is notorious for using their own names in place of the chemical name on their generics. They did it with Methadone (which they brand as Methadose), and most recently Methylphenidate (Methylin). It is still treated as a generic medication.

If the doctor signs 'substitution permitted,' you can substitute in Meythlin without needing his approval. It's AA or AB rated as the equivalent of Ritalin, and anything that has a rating that demonstrates therapeutic equivalence can be used in place of what is prescribed. That is unless he signs 'Dispense As Written' or writes 'brand medically necessary.' That's rare with Ritalin, though.

As for changing Schedule II Rxs: 'Substitution Permitted' is an all-access pass to replace the drug written on the Rx with its generic form with two conditions: it must be shown to have therapeutic equivalence, and must cost the patient less than the brand-name. And with a phone call, the only thing that cannot be changed is the date written and the patients name. Doctors, strength, drugs, and directions can all be changed over the phone.

Gregster
03-09-05, 02:15 AM
Rules about substitutions will vary by state and province, I do believe. I know in Ontario, for controled substances - schedule II, etc - the pharmacist has to dispense exactly as written and if there is a mistake, you have to get a new scrip - I guess this is intended to cut down of forged scrips??? It does not matter at all if "Substitutions permitted" is written down or not. My doctor made a mistake on the size of the pill 10mg vs 5mg - the 10 was not available - and I had to go back and get a new scrip from the doctor - a phone call would not fix it. I would imagine that in places where you have to get your scrips in triplicate, etc. you wouldn't be able to change it by phone either. I have heard that in some places Ritalin isn't as tightly controlled as Adderall and Dexedrine and you can have changes phoned in - but I could be mistaken on this. Since the states govern their pharmacies themselves, they could all have different rules. I imagine your pharmacist will tell you what the rules are if you ask him - it's a ligitimate question.

Trooper Keith
09-13-05, 09:50 PM
Methylin is not a brand for Ritalin, it's Mallinckrodt's way of being cool by not using the generic name of the drug for their generic drug. In many states, by law it must be substituted for a prescription for Ritalin, unless the doctor or the patient requests the brand. It's the same as generic Methylphenidate HCl, just manufactured by Mallinckrodt.

Jaycee
09-14-05, 10:00 PM
The biggest difference with Methylin is that it was created with kids in mind so the dosage starts at 2.5 Mg instead of 5 Mg like Ritalin and generic methylphenidate. No more pill slpitting to get half doses that kids may need.

Dave123
09-29-05, 08:19 PM
Methylin is NOT a brand name drug.
Sure it is. Click here on (http://www.accessdata.fda.gov/scripts/cder/drugsatfda/index.cfm?fuseaction=Search.Overview&DrugName=METHYLIN) (NDA # 021475 (http://www.accessdata.fda.gov/scripts/cder/drugsatfda/index.cfm?fuseaction=Search.Overview&DrugName=METHYLIN)) (http://www.accessdata.fda.gov/scripts/cder/drugsatfda/index.cfm?fuseaction=Search.Overview&DrugName=METHYLIN) at the FDA (or any NDA) and note "Brand Name Drug". Is the FDA wrong?

Trooper Keith
09-29-05, 10:25 PM
It is wrong to say it's not a brand name drug, because it is a brand. It's a brand produced by a generic manufacturer and substituted as a generic for Ritalin. Is it a brand? Yes. It's Methylin brand methylphenidate hydrochloride. Is it used as a generic by many pharmacies? Yes, anyone who contracts with Mallinckrodt as one of their generic manufacturers.

As I said before, it's basically Mallinckrodt's way of being cool.

Dave123
09-29-05, 10:56 PM
I filed an ineffective claim with FDA's Medwatch because what was in the bottle was in my opinion gargage, and not generic Ritalin. The drug company (http://pharmaceuticals.mallinckrodt.com/GenericPharmaceuticals/) sent a letter saying I took Methylin chewable tablets.

Methylin is a chewable tablet and oral solution brand name (www.methylin4kids.com), and Methylin is also a generic nonchewable tablet? Can you imagine the dispensing errors on two drugs with meth in them, both tablets, and both therapeutic equivelants with the active ingredient of methylphenidate hydrochloride?

Why the FDA allowed that and approved that for marketing is beyond me.

Trooper Keith
09-29-05, 11:16 PM
They're marked differently. The pharmacist involved in this was careless in allowing that to happen. The two prescriptions would be written differently, and that mistake was not acceptable...

But because I enjoy feeding controversy, I will say, in his defense, that the two bottles are virtually identical...same shape and mechanism, just one has a yellow label on off green, and the other is all off green.

Still, the NDCs don't match, so that was a careless mistake.

Dave123
09-30-05, 05:05 AM
They're marked differently. The pharmacist involved in this was careless in allowing that to happen. The two prescriptions would be written differently, and that mistake was not acceptable...

But because I enjoy feeding controversy, I will say, in his defense, that the two bottles are virtually identical...same shape and mechanism, just one has a yellow label on off green, and the other is all off green.

Still, the NDCs don't match, so that was a careless mistake.
It was at multiple pharmacies over some time, which is why I am surprised the FDA allows multiple Methylin tablets with the word "meth" in it. The chewable has now been recalled, call a pharmacy and they can't even order it if they wanted too. There should be no further mix ups, if it happened.

I called the FDA, where are you seeing bottles of both at currently?

mctavish23
09-30-05, 10:16 PM
Personally, I won't take generic medications again. They simply haven't had the same potency/degree of efficacy for me as the brand names.

Trooper Keith
10-01-05, 02:25 AM
We have chewables of Methylphenidate at my pharmacy. They may not be called Methylin, I don't remember, and it being the narco-locker I can't just stroll in and take a look. I believe they were, because the scripts are written "Methylin chewable 4mg" and such. That might be doctor error, and we substitute a generic or something...I'll look into it on the 8th of Oct. if I remember, when I'm back at work for a day...

RonRitalin
11-05-10, 01:03 PM
And don't forget there's also a Methylin Extended Release!! Mallinkrodt (action verb) donkey (noun).

tkc1992
01-12-11, 01:54 PM
I filed an ineffective claim with FDA's Medwatch because what was in the bottle was in my opinion gargage, and not generic Ritalin. The drug company (http://pharmaceuticals.mallinckrodt.com/GenericPharmaceuticals/) sent a letter saying I took Methylin chewable tablets.

Methylin is a chewable tablet and oral solution brand name (www.methylin4kids.com (http://www.methylin4kids.com)), and Methylin is also a generic nonchewable tablet? Can you imagine the dispensing errors on two drugs with meth in them, both tablets, and both therapeutic equivelants with the active ingredient of methylphenidate hydrochloride?

Why the FDA allowed that and approved that for marketing is beyond me.


I would just like to point out that the fact the word 'Meth' is in the drug name DOES NOT mean that there is any Methamphetamines in the medication.
From what I can tell, I've been on both Ritalin and Methylin, they work the same to me. One's just more inexpensive than the other.