View Full Version : What is SID?


Keppig
05-28-03, 07:54 PM
I've never heard of this and I'm curious to what it is.

Andrew
05-28-03, 09:53 PM
Sensory Integration Dysfunction is the inability of the brain to correctly process information brought in by the senses. Sensory Integration Dysfunction (SID/DSI) or sensory processing deficits can come in many different forms. No two children will be affected in the same ways. SID/DSI was first noticed in children with autism or who had autistic traits but is also seen in children with other disabilities such as cerebral palsy or ADD/ADHD or can be present by itself. Children can have mild, moderate or severe SI deficits. SID/DSI is treatable with therapy and a sensory diet set up by an occupational therapist who is trained in SI.

Children with SID/DSI can be either hyposensitive or hypersensitive to outside stimuli. For example a child who is hyposensitive to touch will constantly be crashing into things seeking extra stimulation while the hypersensitive child will avoid being touched or touching things when at all possible. SID/DSI can also include children who have processing deficits in one or more areas. Visual and auditory processing deficits are noticed in children with cerebral palsy quite often. When a child has a visual processing deficit, it does not mean that they cannot see. It means that they have a hard time finding the words for objects they are viewing or, if asked to go get an object, they might look right at it and then say they can't find it. This is because they are seeing it but their brains are not processing that they are seeing it. Auditory processing deficits are the same, the child hears what you say but the brain does not process it so the child understands or it takes several minutes for what you have said to "click" with the child. One way to help with auditory processing deficits is to break down instructions, giving them one thing at a time to do. Let them finish the first task before you give them another instruction. Listening or music therapy can also help with auditory processing deficits. Below is a list of other behaviors exibited by children with SID/DSI:

Loves to spin, swing and jump--this will seem to calm them down after several minutes.

Complains of how clothing feels, does not like tags left in their clothing and have to have their socks on just so, or a certain kind of sock.

Picky eaters--get stuck on one certain food and is basically impossible to get them to eat anything else.

Oversensitivity to smells. Or undersensitivity--may sniff people, objects, food.

Oversensitivity to sounds--will frequently cover ears. Or undersensivity.

May have an exceptionally high pain tolerance

May tire easily

Unusually high or low activity level

Resists new situations

Problems with muscle tone, coordination, motor planning

Can be very impulsive or distractible.

Persistently walks on toes to avoid sensory input from the bottom of the feet. This can also be a sign of cerebral palsy if the child is unable to bring their feet down flat when asked or trying.

These are just a few of the symptoms that children with SID/DSI can exhibit.

* The above text was almost completely copied from: http://www.geocities.com/~kasmom/sid.html

jimmmaaa
06-11-03, 07:04 PM
My son has Sensory Integration Dysfunction. He may actually have Aspergers Syndrome and we are in the process of trying to get him seen at the M.I.N.D. Institute at UC Davis. Hopefully we will get to a doctor qualified to deal in this soon, it has been a long road of medical redtape!!

Anyone on this board have a child with Aspergers Syndrome?

Overload
06-24-03, 06:56 PM
Auditory processing deficits are the same, the child hears what you say but the brain does not process it so the child understands or it takes several minutes for what you have said to "click" with the child.

This is me, for sure. It has ALWAYS been a problem for me. Consequently, I always received "does not listen and follow directions" on my report card in school.

Even today, it is one hell of a struggle. And people are MUCH less tolerant of your not 'getting it' as an adult and the consequences can be quite unpleasant. It is often a very painful disorder.

aforceforgood
06-24-03, 11:11 PM
Hmmm, I was about to post that my walking on the balls of my feet when I was younger was more a result of my constant "fight or flight" readiness due to my abuse at the hands of my father when I was younger, then I remembered I hate having the tags in my clothes...

krisp
11-21-03, 10:10 AM
It drove my mom crazy that I wouldn't stop walking on the balls of my feet. She told me all about how bad it was for my feet, my knees, my back, etc. I knew she was right, but walking any other way just didn't feel right. Also can't stand tags, scratchy clothes, turtlenecks, high-pitched noises ... Now I see all this and more in my 5-y.o., too.

waywardclam
11-21-03, 02:52 PM
I am seriously affected by certain touches, sounds, tastes, smells too... I can't stand people being in my body space... my wife and son I have learned to tolerate for the most part, but sometimes I need to back them off too.

I have never been able to tolerate any clothing or hair on my throat/neck or my forehead either. And I react with involuntary violence to any attempt to tickle me.

My wife is EXTREMELY sensitive to scent. Cat litter, perfume, cleaning chemicals all drive her out of the room... she cannot tolerate them at all. Deep bass rumbling sounds do the same thing to her - instant headache.

My son has almost the opposite - noise, motion, physical touch all thrill him, he seems addicted to them...

ADDitives
03-08-05, 05:46 AM
a few years ago, and even last year, i went through a few periods of walking on the balls of my feet.

i often have the visual DSI when looking for soemthing. after i find the thing, i think to myself how STUPID i am for not seeing it when it was literally right infront of me.

sometimes i can be HOLDING soemthing, and i look for it for 10 minutes until i click and realise "hey... im holding this thing!"

i have slight auditory DSI also
- often i dont hear / i miss something that is said, so i say "what?" asking for repetition. as soon as i have said this, i 'hear' what it said, before the person repeats is for me.
- often i will hear all the words, but i wont hear them in the right order, and / or i just wont be able to make any sense whatsoever of the meaning.. i just cant get ANY meaning out of it.

with the visual also.... i dont know if its anything to do with this, i will often look at something like a sign or a short phrase, and the words will all LOOK completely scrambled, or i will actually SEE different words than are there.

INaBOX
11-19-05, 11:30 PM
My 5 yr old son is very much the same way. He has auditory sensitivities for the most part. He is often seen covering his ears; is always asking to repeat yourself even if he 'hears' you .. in fact, it just dawned on me about what you said about the delayed processing. I've asked him many times, "Why do you always ask me to repeat myself when you know what I said??" I think it's because between him asking and me telling, he's already processed what's been said. So thank you for this tidbit. It never occured to me.

He also has issues with motion; water poured over his head in a bath; transitions; skin sensitivities - often complains I 'scrub' him too hard in bath time; water temperatures. Baths are usually luke warm. I'm glad I found this site.

Ihavekeys?
11-19-05, 11:52 PM
what is SID?
three times a day in reference to meds

mctavish23
11-20-05, 01:15 AM
My understanding is that the original research of Jane Ayer's, the "discoverer" of SID, has only been replicated by her grad students.

As such, it remains an unproven theoretical construct.

This is a perfect example where I disagree with the idea that it doesn't exist, because I clearly have whatever it is (or isn"t), and have been thru OT (Occupational Therapy ) twice as an adult.

By the same token, I also know that unless and until those data are substantiated, that the above statement remains true.

Crazygirl79
11-20-05, 09:47 PM
I'm highly suspected of having SID and I'm only just finding out about it myself

bandie08
12-05-07, 09:07 AM
I found this very interesting http://www.incrediblehorizons.com/sensory-integration.htm (http://www.incrediblehorizons.com/sensory-integration.htm)

bandie08
05-22-08, 12:16 PM
SID is also short for sidney :) lol

QueensU_girl
05-22-08, 12:55 PM
I just read a good book on this: something like Too Bright, Too Loud, etc.

theta
05-29-08, 08:44 PM
As the rate of change in a sequence of sensory input or its intensity increases its more likely to exceed your capacity to process/tolerate that datastream.
Two modems trying to communicating with each other at different speeds is an example. Or using incompatible voltages would be an example of using intensity values way out of range of each modems ability to operate. Since presumably whole areas of the brain are dedicated to various senses. People may have different abilities to process different types of sensory data.

Oh the above is based on what I think SID is. I really never studied it. In my case rapid changes in visual input are somewhat overwhelming for me.

DotwithADD
05-29-08, 08:59 PM
Sensory Integration Dysfunction is the inability of the brain to correctly process information brought in by the senses. Sensory Integration Dysfunction (SID/DSI) or sensory processing deficits can come in many different forms. No two children will be affected in the same ways. SID/DSI was first noticed in children with autism or who had autistic traits but is also seen in children with other disabilities such as cerebral palsy or ADD/ADHD or can be present by itself. Children can have mild, moderate or severe SI deficits. SID/DSI is treatable with therapy and a sensory diet set up by an occupational therapist who is trained in SI.

Children with SID/DSI can be either hyposensitive or hypersensitive to outside stimuli. For example a child who is hyposensitive to touch will constantly be crashing into things seeking extra stimulation while the hypersensitive child will avoid being touched or touching things when at all possible. SID/DSI can also include children who have processing deficits in one or more areas. Visual and auditory processing deficits are noticed in children with cerebral palsy quite often. When a child has a visual processing deficit, it does not mean that they cannot see. It means that they have a hard time finding the words for objects they are viewing or, if asked to go get an object, they might look right at it and then say they can't find it. This is because they are seeing it but their brains are not processing that they are seeing it. Auditory processing deficits are the same, the child hears what you say but the brain does not process it so the child understands or it takes several minutes for what you have said to "click" with the child. One way to help with auditory processing deficits is to break down instructions, giving them one thing at a time to do. Let them finish the first task before you give them another instruction. Listening or music therapy can also help with auditory processing deficits. Below is a list of other behaviors exibited by children with SID/DSI:

Loves to spin, swing and jump--this will seem to calm them down after several minutes.

Complains of how clothing feels, does not like tags left in their clothing and have to have their socks on just so, or a certain kind of sock.

Picky eaters--get stuck on one certain food and is basically impossible to get them to eat anything else.

Oversensitivity to smells. Or undersensitivity--may sniff people, objects, food.

Oversensitivity to sounds--will frequently cover ears. Or undersensivity.

May have an exceptionally high pain tolerance

May tire easily

Unusually high or low activity level

Resists new situations

Problems with muscle tone, coordination, motor planning

Can be very impulsive or distractible.

Persistently walks on toes to avoid sensory input from the bottom of the feet. This can also be a sign of cerebral palsy if the child is unable to bring their feet down flat when asked or trying.

These are just a few of the symptoms that children with SID/DSI can exhibit.

* The above text was almost completely copied from: http://www.geocities.com/~kasmom/sid.html

Wow... that sounds so much like me, as a kid and now! Also, with nerve deafness in one ear and hearing loss (hereditary) in both ears... that makes it worse... but I have somewhat survived it all. But, I did have a tough time with that Auditory type... growing up. But, I have to tell myself (keeps me from going and staying into that self-pity mode), it could be worse - others have it worse!

theta
06-03-08, 09:00 AM
I just saw this posted on Digg:

http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/24934303/

I think it explains the mechanism of my visual sensory integration problems.
Basically there is a lag time say 1/10 of second between when you see something and its processed in your visual center in your brain. Your brain automatic tries to guess the next 1/10 of a second to make up for this lag(the article is about how we can predictive the future well 1/10 second into the future). So I assume either the lag time is different in SID and/or the ability to predict the next 1/10 second is impaired.

illusive
06-09-08, 07:04 AM
Woah, I can relate to alot of this stuff.

Even the high pain threashold. I've often thought I could handle more of certain kinds of pain. You know when you go to the doctor cause you have a suspected broken bone or something and they are like 'does it hurt here?', does it hurt here, what about here? I've never said yes ever.

And, I have extremely hot showers ...

Sometimes my sense of smell is pretty wierd. I will smell something I think is one thing and then find out that what I thought was nice smelling is actually mince..and being vegetarian it's the last thing I want to be saying smells like something delicious.

Mary
06-09-08, 08:40 AM
Can't take extremely hot showers... it feels like I'm being burned alive. Of course... I have the fibromyalgia... and I never had a problem with SID.. until after that diagnosis. It says in my book for Fibromyalgia that patients should NOT take hot showers.. or let the hot water run on your head for an extended period.. because it lowers the levels of serotonin..even more than they already are. And before anyone says what does that have to do with ADD or SID.... if you haven't seen my previous posts, ADD and Fibromyalgia are caused by the same lack of serotonin levels.

About SIDS- Now the kids cutting up puts me into a tailspin. To the point that I end up crying... if they or I don't leave the room.

The combination of the a/c, tv, kids and other noises.. makes it feel like the walls are closing in and I have to go outside to get back into balance.

I've also noticed more migraines... and how the noises all combine to bring them on... it's like a wave coming in.. then when it crashes against the sand/my mind ...... the headache is there.

I can go to the doctor... and be poked and prodded...and do ok. But something as minor as the bp cuff being too tight will put me in tears. I have a lovely bruise by the way.. from my surgery the other day, because of that very thing.

adhdogwalker
07-02-08, 12:56 AM
My psychiatrist just added Sensory Integration Dysfunction to my ADHD and Bipolar diagnoses last week.

I have an extreme noise sensitivity-- to the point that I got in a 2 hr. fight with the ice cream truck man last night and was, at one point, climbing around on my 6th floor fire escape with an arsenal of tomatoes and eggs from my refrigerator ready to hurl them at his infernal truck if he didn't turn off the song. He then proceeded to move out of range but not out of earshot, so I had to go downstairs and ended up injuring my foot kicking his truck.

I also suffer from the auditory processing delays mentioned and although I do not have any sort of hearing loss, I say "what? I didn't understand what you said" constantly because it takes a bit for my brain to catch up and to understand what was just said.

As for the other sensory stuff:

-I have an extremely high tolerance to pain.

-I am obsessed with bright colors and have an extremely keen sense of and memory for color. (I can not look at a piece of fabric for months, then go to the fabric store and pick the spool of thread that will match it exactly)

-I can only listen to music if I am in motion- either in the car, dancing, jogging, or walking.

-Everyone says I walk as if I weigh 300 lbs although I weigh 105.

-I have extreme smell sensitivities: I get migraines (instant) and vomit from chemical smells and had to switch to all natural cleaning products. I can also smell if anyone has done any type of illegal drug, which one and how much.

-I also can not tolerate florescent lights at times- instant vomiting migraine. Sometimes I walk in a store and start freaking out and ask people how they can shop there because of the painful intensity of the light as I try to shield my eyes and blink like crazy. Other days, I am okay.

-Dust on my hands-- I go crazy! I also won't wear shorts because I can't stand the feeling of my bare skin touching anything but clothing.

-I get obsessed with certain foods and that's all that I can stand to eat. Eventually, I get sick of it and will never touch it again.

There's lots more but I just wanted to add one last thing. Although I do not have Aspergers, my father does, so I believe there's some type of genetic basis for these sensitivities. Does anyone else have a family history of it or of autism?

catch23
07-20-08, 02:09 AM
The comment about saying 'what?' and then processing before they repeat it... spooky! That's me to a tee, though more when I was younger.

And sometimes someone will say something that just doesn't register, I hear the words and it's distinct from simply being distracted and not focusing, but they just don't process into a logical thought, so I have to ask them to repeat it or guess at what they said. Which helps explain why I go out of my way to talk with people in person rather than over the phone.

Also have a lot of trouble getting my thoughts into words and writing, though writing I can eventually get it down, but verbally don't have that luxury of time. If you were to compare a paper I wrote to discussing the same topic in person there would appear to be a huge difference in my intelligence, interest, etc.

Also often look all over for something I just had and then find it right in front of me, just didn't see it. And somewhat oversensitive to touch - clothes, etc - and sounds. Which makes anywhere with a lot of people and conversations overwhelming. Sometimes I even have to leave a bar or somewhere for a bit, because the onslaught of hearing every conversation and the music is too much.

I hadn't really thought about my difficulties from the sensory side of things. It's interesting, though I can definitely see some cross over in terms of working memory. And so the saga continues..:rolleyes:

DotwithADD
07-20-08, 02:41 AM
Can't take extremely hot showers... it feels like I'm being burned alive. Of course... I have the fibromyalgia... and I never had a problem with SID.. until after that diagnosis. It says in my book for Fibromyalgia that patients should NOT take hot showers.. or let the hot water run on your head for an extended period.. because it lowers the levels of serotonin..even more than they already are. And before anyone says what does that have to do with ADD or SID.... if you haven't seen my previous posts, ADD and Fibromyalgia are caused by the same lack of serotonin levels.

About SIDS- Now the kids cutting up puts me into a tailspin. To the point that I end up crying... if they or I don't leave the room.

The combination of the a/c, tv, kids and other noises.. makes it feel like the walls are closing in and I have to go outside to get back into balance.

I've also noticed more migraines... and how the noises all combine to bring them on... it's like a wave coming in.. then when it crashes against the sand/my mind ...... the headache is there.

I can go to the doctor... and be poked and prodded...and do ok. But something as minor as the bp cuff being too tight will put me in tears. I have a lovely bruise by the way.. from my surgery the other day, because of that very thing.

Hey, Mary... Just thought of something... don't know if it would help pain, though... I know that Epsom (sp?) salts are for bruises.. but would they also help alleviate some of the pain, or even a little? Of course, you don't want the water too hot, just "warm" enough to be comfortable to you???

mumtothree
01-10-09, 07:03 AM
ive been doing some research on this for my son, i have recently bought a book called the out of sync child its fab, i went through the symptons and so much like him.
ive only heard about it the last couple of weeks

mctavish23
01-14-09, 02:14 PM
In truth, Sensory Integration Disorder (SID) is more of a theoretical construct than an actual "disorder."

That's because Jean Ayers,author of Sensory Inegration and the Child, hasn't had her research replicated by anyone other than her own grad students.

Having said that,I have whatever this is or isn't.

If I had to "pick" a name, it would probably be along the lines of Devlopmental Coordination Disorder.

Either way, I've been through Occupational Therapy (OT) twice as an adult.

Both of those were lots of fun and were also helpful.

The Out of Sync Child and The Out of SYnc Child Has Fun,both by Carol Stock Kranowitz, have already become "classics."

tc

mctavish23

(Robert)

Crazygirl79
01-16-09, 07:09 PM
Google it and you'll find some really great websites on it with very good information...I only found out at 25 that I have SID along with the ADHD and my life's been a lot easier.

Selena

ADDnBeyond
05-22-09, 01:10 AM
I know this thread is kind of old but if u see this, I was wondering how or in what ways ur life has become easier? Have u had any kind(s) of treatment?

Google it and you'll find some really great websites on it with very good information...I only found out at 25 that I have SID along with the ADHD and my life's been a lot easier.

Selena