View Full Version : Advantages and disadvantages of ADHD in school


rickymooston
10-16-11, 12:02 PM
ADHD can be an disadvantage but it can be an advantage too.

How to use your knowledge of yourself to excell?

This is how I see it?
Good
1. Potential to be creative.
2. Potential to be high level focused and really understand.
3. Goal oriented, long term intangible goals won't work for you but short term ones might
4. Ability to do something well, if you get interested in it.
5. Top down focused. if you understand, you will really understand.

Bad
1. Easily bored
2. Hard to keep interested and overcome inertia
3. Easily side tracked.
4. Crapy memory and crappy and doing tedious manual tasks. (practice makes perfect but ...)

Sorry, my creative juices are dead here. I was an ABC student in school. That is, my grades went all over the spectrum.

Nnnnnn
10-16-11, 12:42 PM
Me:

Good:
+daydreams to survive the long hours;););)
+Knowing everything of something that interest me:eek:. I don't need to "study", I am like a vacuum cleaner: read once, downloaded.

Bad:Same as yours
+Making school an enemy territory, a prison
+Not being able to focus when I want, I can't do boring things, peopple tried to force me but it's IMPOSSIBLE.
+Procrastination: Never study, never prepare for exams until the last minute
+Different way of thinking, thoughts are not organised the same way (obvious when everyone around you answer the same way but you can't, that's one of the moment when you feel inferior to others)
+Disorganised too
+Underperform
+Understand everything but can't use them when NEEDED (crappy memory):eek:. I have a very good memory it's just that it doesn't work when I need it, it's in my brain but I can't "grab" it.
+The daydreaming, quiet child doesn't attract others, she doesn't "get" people and doen't know how to interact properly because she constently interrupt, don't listen, distracted etc:cool::o.
+Being different is good but it lead people into thinking I am retarderd (was asked a few times if i was in the class for normal people, they were surprised). Classmates surprised at my good results (I was average but i did get top grades once in while, depending of the subject). :o:p


Everything is making you understand you are different make you think you are INFERIOR to others, wich is wrong, we are simply different and it's hard to be different because everything you are/say/think won't be accepted as easily as the others.:):):)

The "you" is not directed to the OP. It's a general "you", I didn't know how to express myslef properly. It's only my thoughts about ADD/school.

Phantastic
10-16-11, 01:01 PM
If i have any advantages in school they certainly don't originate from my diagnosis. :-)

However, because of my diagnosis I've had to become very skilled at analyzing my own thought patterns just to function. This was a prerequisite before I could even step foot on a school campus. I was so beat up from past school experiences that I had become the ultimate academic self defeatists. I simply did not believe that i could be successful in that setting. Every time a negative line of thought would surface in consciousness, filling me with self doubt, I had to find a way to see through it; I had to provide an alternative story about who I was and what i could do.

So if i get any strengths from my weaknesses, it is from struggling against them every day and learning to adapt.

Cheers!

rickymooston
10-16-11, 05:19 PM
So if i get any strengths from my weaknesses, it is from struggling against them every day and learning to adapt.


Hi Chemic

Learning how to adapt is a huge part of it, understanding yourself is the first step and overcoming the perception of past failures is also part of it. Its good that you are overcoming the perception that you are inadequate.

Our memory mostly sucks. For this reason, having a top down approach to things, a "high level design", is the way we operate best. Thing is, most people don't operate this way. Odd thing is, most experts operate this way. Now, I will reverse engineer from examples because most people are example based (bottom up).

Have you tried brain storming. I'm not lying, I really believe we are way better at it than average. It is no accident that people with ADHD excel in many creative and research fields. Any of the books by Edward De Bono can be scanned in a good afternoon; e.g., Lateral Thinking.

How visual is your thinking? When you understand something, how well do you remember it? The question is how to apply this skill to your course work. How to relate stuff together.

Do you prefer reading the text book to listening to a boring lecturer? :D Id did.

Whether you agree with my assessment or not, the literature claims we have skills as well as problems. The school system isn't designed for us but it doesn't mean we can excel.

In retrospect, had I understood myself better, would I have considered medication? I don't know. Sometimes its tempting.

pechemignonne
10-16-11, 05:35 PM
I don't see how any of my ADHD symptoms helped me in school, but a lot of them were disadvantages.

What literature are you talking about that claims that ADHD gives us skills? My ADHD isn't a skill set, it's a disorder. It's identifiable by a bunch of symptoms, none of which have any obvious "positive side" as far as I can see.

I have a lot of positive qualities and abilities, but I don't see any as coming from my ADHD.

rickymooston
10-16-11, 08:57 PM
pechemignonne

Classifying something as being a disorder can be somewhat subjective. We are different. If I didn't have any problems related to those differences, I'd not stop by this forum. I'm pretty sure one of my co-workers has ADHD too; he has a whole automated system around it. He doesn't have ADHD according to the DSM IV because its not causing him trouble. (He programmed his routine into Microsoft outlook at he uses the alarms to trigger every key task he does ...)

Try googling "creativity" and ADHD. You will find several studies show ADHDers are on average more creative.

The farmer/hunter theory also occurs in a few papers. The author discusses some positives

There is an awesome book called "The Gift of ADHD" which discusses coping strategies and also some of the positives such as "creativity", hyperfocus and so on. Many books discuss "adaptions" turning it more into a strength and less a weakness.

I have the inattentive form of ADHD; I have an awesome visual imagination. Hell, when I fidget, 99% of the time, I am visualizing things.

There are several studies which discuss "misdiagnosis" of gifted students as having ADHD. There are also studies of gifted students with ADHD.

The array of behaviors and symptoms associated with ADHD is quite broad. There must be a link. I presume a gene or two is involved.

Several people consider it a two edged sword. If you look, you may indeed find advantages to some of the symptoms that affect you. You certainly will find you are better at some professions than others.

I'd be an awesome systems analyst (using lots of high level analysis skills) and horrible as an accountant (computing mindless details).

All that said, I'm still trying to decide if, at 45, I want to try medication or biofeedback or not. In school, I had marks all over the board but I think I was and am capable of good grades in appropriate subjects. Its hard to be consistant and hard to avoid my weaknesses.

pechemignonne
10-16-11, 09:13 PM
Try googling "creativity" and ADHD. You will find several studies show ADHDers are on average more creative.
I've heard that, and I don't believe it. First of all, I don't think you can measure creativity. Secondly, I haven't seen anything that proves that any creativity we may have is actually caused by ADHD, and not something that I would have if I didn't have ADHD, but I would actually be able to use. Which I can't right now, because my ADHD prevents me from being able to follow through on my creativity.

The farmer/hunter theory also occurs in a few papers. The author discusses some positives
I think that the people positing that theory are misrepresenting both evolution and the concept of disability.

There is an awesome book called "The Gift of ADHD" which discusses coping strategies and also some of the positives such as "creativity", hyperfocus and so on. Many books discuss "adaptions" turning it more into a strength and less a weakness.
Again, I don't think those "positives" are either positive, or they are not related to my ADHD.

I have the inattentive form of ADHD; I have an awesome visual imagination. Hell, when I fidget, 99% of the time, I am visualizing things.
That's nice, but I don't think that your visual imagination has anything to do with your ADHD. Most notably, because the areas of the brain affected by ADHD don't have to do with visual imagination, they have to do with executive functions.

There are several studies which discuss "misdiagnosis" of gifted students as having ADHD. There are also studies of gifted students with ADHD.
The people who are misdiagnosed don't have ADHD, so I don't see how they are relevant. The people who are gifted and have ADHD would have been gifted whether or not they had ADHD. Not having ADHD would just have allowed them to do more with their giftedness.

The array of behaviors and symptoms associated with ADHD is quite broad. There must be a link. I presume a gene or two is involved.
There are many genes involved in ADHD.

Several people consider it a two edged sword. If you look, you may indeed find advantages to some of the symptoms that affect you. You certainly will find you are better at some professions than others.

I'd be an awesome systems analyst (using lots of high level analysis skills) and horrible as an accountant (computing mindless details).
Everyone would be better at some professions than others. I can't think of a single profession where an executive function disorder would be an asset.

If you find that there are positives to you having ADHD, that's nice for you, but there is no advantage to my ADHD for me. I don't have to think about it more, or read a book about it. My creativity has actually been significantly impaired throughout my life because of ADHD. And there is no compelling evidence that ADHD has a "positive side" for everyone.

rickymooston
10-17-11, 12:27 AM
I've heard that, and I don't believe it. First of all, I don't think you can measure creativity.


If you were paid to "measure creativity", I'm sure you would come up with some reasonable heuristics to measure it. Experimental design is cool.

In some contexts, I'm critisized for "going off track" and being unfocused. This is most defiitely my ADHD.

In other contexts, my same tendency to "go off track", involves me offering more ideas than other people during brain storming sessions. This is the same trait as the last one.


Which I can't right now, because my ADHD prevents me from being able to follow through on my creativity.


Its hard to answer this without understanding your specific situation. Techniques exist that some people with ADHD have used to "follow through their creativity". (In addition, many people, have managed to apparently use medication successfully; I am unmedicated tho.)

In my case, I followed through on my creativity, in some cases, but other areas of my life (such as my apartment) suffered. It goes without saying, I found some was to adapt to my disability but I didn't succeed totally.


I think that the people positing that theory are misrepresenting both evolution and the concept of disability.


The concept of a disability is a label, not a scientific term. Whether a specific trait is negative or positive, may depend on the context. Certainly, there are jobs I can't do easily because of my inherent disorganzation.

In terms of evolution applying to this theory, it would first have to be demonstrated that ADHD was hereditary. Some evidence suggests this but that evidence isn't conclusive. To my knowledge, no gene(s) have been positively identified that cause ADHD.

Some of the evidence I have seen in support of that theory:
1) I know a lot people people with hyperactivity excel in a military environment and in sports.
2) I know that some evidence suggests that aboriginal populations MAY have a higher incidence of ADHD than other populations; this is contraversial but certainly some evidence suggests this.

It was 10 years ago that I saw the theory but I believe the researcher in question is reasonably well regarded.


Again, I don't think those "positives" are either positive, or they are not related to my ADHD.


Yes, you've said this. :)


That's nice, but I don't think that your visual imagination has anything to do with your ADHD. Most notably, because the areas of the brain affected by ADHD don't have to do with visual imagination, they have to do with executive functions.


Much of this visualization occurs when I "space out", day dreaming, in a hyperfocus state. Day dreaming and hyperfocusing are both symptoms of ADHD.

When I fidget, I am frequently visualizing. Again, this seems related.


The people who are misdiagnosed don't have ADHD, so I don't see how they are relevant.


I'm skeptical that they were in fact "misdiagnosed" in the majority of cases. All alternative hypothesis is they have ADHD and they compensate for it successfully in other ways that makes them appear gifted.

ADHD diagnosis is still evolving. I gather a QEEG test exists but it may not be universally accepted yet. Psychological tests exist but I've no clue whether the "false positives" were subjected to those as well.


The people who are gifted and have ADHD would have been gifted whether or not they had ADHD. Not having ADHD would just have allowed them to do more with their giftedness.


Possibly. It would depend which traits were involved in their giftedness. In many cases, their giftedness included using their ADHD traits in ways that those traits were advantageous in addition to using other traits not specific to their ADHD.


There are many genes involved in ADHD.


This is unclear. I don't believe this has been established conclusively. What I believe is true is that some evidence suggests it may have a genetic component. No gene(s) have been isolated.


Everyone would be better at some professions than others. I can't think of a single profession where an executive function disorder would be an asset.


Not all of the large number of symptoms of ADHD involve "executive function" but they are all apparently related to a specific area of the brain: frontol lobes I believe.


If you find that there are positives to you having ADHD, that's nice for you, but there is no advantage to my ADHD for me. I don't have to think about it more, or read a book about it. My creativity has actually been significantly impaired throughout my life because of ADHD. And there is no compelling evidence that ADHD has a "positive side" for everyone.


You may be right, on the other hand, what if others have tried things you haven't? If you admit the possibility, you may find better coping tools. On the other hand, you may not.

The question is, if other people with ADHD do succeed in "getting things done", is it worth it for you to find ways that work for you or not.

pechemignonne
10-17-11, 12:58 PM
In some contexts, I'm critisized for "going off track" and being unfocused. This is most defiitely my ADHD.

In other contexts, my same tendency to "go off track", involves me offering more ideas than other people during brain storming sessions. This is the same trait as the last one.
Sure, but the ideas themselves would probably be there if you didn't have ADHD, it's just that you would stay on track like the other NTs and not bring it up. I'm sure that there are NTs who are more extroverted who see the same positive effect of expressing more ideas, and they don't have ADHD.

Plus, I can't even hold down a full-time job in the first place. So I can see that if you don't have symptoms of ADHD that interfere with your ability to work, that contributing more to brainstorming sessions would be a positive. It just doesn't apply to someone like me.

Its hard to answer this without understanding your specific situation. Techniques exist that some people with ADHD have used to "follow through their creativity". (In addition, many people, have managed to apparently use medication successfully; I am unmedicated tho.)

In my case, I followed through on my creativity, in some cases, but other areas of my life (such as my apartment) suffered. It goes without saying, I found some was to adapt to my disability but I didn't succeed totally.
The point is that my creativity doesn't come from my ADHD, and it is only harmed by it. I know that treatment will help me follow through more consistently. Because treatment will either reduce my symptoms or reduce my impairments. In other words, it will reduce how affected I am by my ADHD, and allow me to live up to my creative potential that was constrained by my ADHD.

The concept of a disability is a label, not a scientific term. Whether a specific trait is negative or positive, may depend on the context.
It's a socio-cultural term, and a very useful one. In this context, the one of current reality, ADHD is a disability. I can imagine a context wherein having no limbs and being completely blind might be a positive, from an evolutionarily adaptive standpoint, that doesn't make a blind quadriplegic any less disabled in the current reality.

In terms of evolution applying to this theory, it would first have to be demonstrated that ADHD was hereditary. Some evidence suggests this but that evidence isn't conclusive. To my knowledge, no gene(s) have been positively identified that cause ADHD.
Most genes have not been identified. The current consensus on ADHD is that it is "highly hereditable". Unless some new evidence presents itself, that is what most experts in the field will continue to assert.

Some of the evidence I have seen in support of that theory:
1) I know a lot people people with hyperactivity excel in a military environment and in sports.
2) I know that some evidence suggests that aboriginal populations MAY have a higher incidence of ADHD than other populations; this is contraversial but certainly some evidence suggests this.
I find that evidence highly questionable, especially in contrast to the opposing evidence.

It was 10 years ago that I saw the theory but I believe the researcher in question is reasonably well regarded.
The nature of science is such that even the most well-regarded researcher can posit a theory that turns out to be completely false.

Much of this visualization occurs when I "space out", day dreaming, in a hyperfocus state. Day dreaming and hyperfocusing are both symptoms of ADHD.

When I fidget, I am frequently visualizing. Again, this seems related.
Again, you are arguing that something is true for everyone with ADHD because it is true for you.

I'm skeptical that they were in fact "misdiagnosed" in the majority of cases. All alternative hypothesis is they have ADHD and they compensate for it successfully in other ways that makes them appear gifted.
If they are able to "compensate" for their ADHD-like symptoms to that point, then they don't have ADHD. Hence, they were misdiagnosed, they appeared to have ADHD because they were understimulated and bored. This can cause similar behavior to ADHD in children. If they are not so impaired by their symptoms that they pass the diagnostic threshold, then by definition they don't have ADHD.

Possibly. It would depend which traits were involved in their giftedness. In many cases, their giftedness included using their ADHD traits in ways that those traits were advantageous in addition to using other traits not specific to their ADHD.
No matter how "gifted" you are, you can't turn an ADHD symptom into a positive. If you do, then by definition, it is no longer a symptom of ADHD, since ADHD diagnostically-speaking has to cause significant impairment.

This is unclear. I don't believe this has been established conclusively. What I believe is true is that some evidence suggests it may have a genetic component. No gene(s) have been isolated.
Like I said, "highly-hereditable" is how ADHD is categorized, and whether or not the specific genes have been isolated has no bearing on that fact.

Not all of the large number of symptoms of ADHD involve "executive function" but they are all apparently related to a specific area of the brain: frontol lobes I believe.
The diagnostic symptoms all have to do with executive functioning.

You may be right, on the other hand, what if others have tried things you haven't? If you admit the possibility, you may find better coping tools. On the other hand, you may not.

The question is, if other people with ADHD do succeed in "getting things done", is it worth it for you to find ways that work for you or not.
Again, you are mistaking treating ADHD with finding something positive about having ADHD. Once my ADHD is successfully treated, it won't cause me as much impairment, because it's effects on my life will be diminished. That is a removal of a negative, the negative being the ADHD impairments. Why would I then turn around and say "having ADHD is so great!" ? That wold be absurd.

pechemignonne
10-17-11, 02:08 PM
For that last sentence, read: *would* be absurd...

rickymooston
10-17-11, 09:31 PM
I agree, if one simply cures one's ADHD or only reduces its effects, it would be silly to say, "having ADHD is an advantage". For that person, it was clearly only a pain in the butt. It is accurate to say, for some people, including me by the way, ADHD is a disadvantage. I'm only saying, that it doesn't have to be. Some people apparently channel it quite well. One valid strategy is to use technology to round off a square peg and another valid strategy is to find squares holes. There is nothing wrong with either; I personally suspect, for most of us, that a combo strategy is probably inevitable but I really don't know how well medication works. I've never been medicated.

Mentioned mentioned a blind quanduped. No comment. I've met several people who were in wheel chairs; hell the girl who got me diagnosed for ADHD is in a wheel chair. I had a co-worker who was blind. He considered his handicap an advantage. As he put it, sighted people think in 2D, he thinks in 3D. Deafness can be a disadvantage and yet, many deaf people don't want hearing implants and love their "deaf culture". Some of them will be offended if you call deafness a handicap!!! :D I also met a guy, who was emotionally destroyed when he lost his sight. For one guy, blindness was a handcap for another it wasn't.

When you say, a person "probably could have had all those creative qualities", if they didn't have ADHD, its hard to say. In overcompensating for one area, a person strengthens others.

You mentioned "I can't hold down a job"; its more accurate to say, "I haven't successfully held down a full time job". The difference is the acknowledgement that there can exist work environments you haven't been exposed to and techniques you haven't tried. In my case, I had a hard time holding down a job for a while then I found something which worked quite well. At the end, I had a bumpy road and then it worked out again. I would also suggest when you say, "I can't finish things", it might be more accurate to consider saying, "I haven't finished a lot of projects".

I like your realism but don't be afraid to think outside the box and look around for others with ADHD who did cope. One or two of them may have had insights you've overlooked.

I have to wash my clothes or apparently, my holding down a job will be a problem. Forgive me while I make my self interested in that annoying activity I totally don't want to engage in. Think high energy.

KronarTheBlack
10-17-11, 09:56 PM
ADHD can be an disadvantage but it can be an advantage too.

How to use your knowledge of yourself to excell?

This is how I see it?
Good
1. Potential to be creative.
2. Potential to be high level focused and really understand.
3. Goal oriented, long term intangible goals won't work for you but short term ones might
4. Ability to do something well, if you get interested in it.
5. Top down focused. if you understand, you will really understand.

1. I would be more creative without ADHD.
2. I would focus more and understand more without ADHD
3. I would be more goal orientated and have better long term goals and the bility to stick to them without ADHD
4. I would be able to do something well even better without ADHD
5. I would understand even better without ADHD.

Bad
1. I would be less bored without ADHD
2. I would not have a problem with being uninterested and lazy
3. I would not be side tracked
4. My memory would be almost photographic without ADHD.

Sorry, my creative juices are dead here. I was an ABC student in school. That is, my grades went all over the spectrum.

Would you be better off with Cancer than without it?
Would you be better off with two of your legs missing than having them?
Would you be better off from brain damage from a fall when you were a kid rather than having a normal brain?

That's great if you can fool yourself into thinking your brain dysfunction is a good thing but no one here will be buying that story.

pechemignonne
10-17-11, 11:07 PM
I agree, if one simply cures one's ADHD or only reduces its effects, it would be silly to say, "having ADHD is an advantage". For that person, it was clearly only a pain in the butt. It is accurate to say, for some people, including me by the way, ADHD is a disadvantage. I'm only saying, that it doesn't have to be. Some people apparently channel it quite well.
People who are able to function without impairment who are not treated do not fit the diagnostic criteria for ADHD. Unless you have significant life impairment when you go in for diagnosis, you won't be found to have ADHD.

When you say, a person "probably could have had all those creative qualities", if they didn't have ADHD, its hard to say. In overcompensating for one area, a person strengthens others.
No, it isn't hard to say. I just said it. My creativity and my ADHD are not linked.

You mentioned "I can't hold down a job"; its more accurate to say, "I haven't successfully held down a full time job". The difference is the acknowledgement that there can exist work environments you haven't been exposed to and techniques you haven't tried. In my case, I had a hard time holding down a job for a while then I found something which worked quite well. At the end, I had a bumpy road and then it worked out again. I would also suggest when you say, "I can't finish things", it might be more accurate to consider saying, "I haven't finished a lot of projects".
I am perfectly happy with the way I currently express myself, thank you very much.

I like your realism but don't be afraid to think outside the box and look around for others with ADHD who did cope. One or two of them may have had insights you've overlooked.
Coping does not equal seeing my ADHD as positive. Finding treatment does not equal seeing my ADHD as positive.

Please stop handing out unsolicited advice. It is very condescending.

jojorenee
10-17-11, 11:07 PM
Ups:

1.) Daydream about what I love to do, becoming famous, how I feel about this one certain guy (: Funny random videos I've watched, random things that make no sense..
2.) Creative with my writing, very perfect with grammar, and good at English and Spanish class. Things that interest me really get my full attention and effort.
3.) Listening to music makes me think happy awesome things that are creative, and inspire me to play music, write...etc.

Downs:
1.) I procrastinate, never get anything done or study, and get average grades because of it, when I know I can do better, I just don't feel like it or forget.
2.) I never fulfill my daydreams.
3.) I can't pay attention in class, and am always feeling drained and bored.
4.) Hard to entertain.
5.) Had anger problems for a while from being a perfectionist. (learned how to control it, though.)
6.) Hard to get up in the mornings, and get to bed at nights due to procrastination.
7.) Always losing things.
8.) Unorganized, forgetful thoughts that pop up when least needed. Memory is unorganized, lol.
9.) Room is messy after cleaning it, and I lose papers in my backpack, or they get crumbled up and scattered every where. It's almost as if I'm lazy and careless. I probably am? I try not to be, but I feel like it's extra stress when I try to stay organized.

rickymooston
10-18-11, 11:50 AM
KronarTheBlack

Compare apples with apples. Deafness or blindness might be a good example
Cancer is a really bad example. Schtizophrenia would also be a bad example.

Also remember there are two strategies here that represent different paradigms
1). Work against one's ADHD
2). Work with your ADHD

I think most people use aspects of both. !BOTH ARE Valid strategies

You are not a bad person, if you find a way to reduce your ADHD.

You are not a bad person, if you find ways to accomodate or channel your ADHD
Into something constructive

For me, the discovery that some people have used the tenencies that tripped me up
In. Constructive ways, is revolutionary.

You don't know you would be as creative without your ADHD. You mighjht be
But the point is lateral thinking is more natural for people with adhd.

As for focus? Adhd is a paradox. When we hyperfocus, we focus more than others.
Sometimes this is bad; the reason I don't drive is I'm scared of zoning out. Other times
That same tendecy has served me well, when I was interestesd in somewthing.

You have ADHD. Its good; you know you have it. If you have a strategy fdor deaing with
that knowledge which it sounds like you do, that's better. Other strategies exist.
If you ever decide to try them, they are there

Back to deafness. If you want an experience, go to a deaf chat room and tell them hearing
Implants are great, asl is obsolete and they can all become regular people! Also
Mention that you are glad they don't have to remain disabed. They will get really
****** off becuase most of them love their deaf culture and hate being imposed
On by the hearing

Don't get mad, get thoughtful. We have adhd. Each of us chooses the path suituing
Us best or we try to.

If it matters to u, I've been tripped up too. I'm not you but differing perspectives exist. Science does
Not totally understand us. Trhey are working on it

sarahsweets
10-18-11, 01:45 PM
I'm just not clear on how I can channel a neurological condition in my brain.

rickymooston
10-18-11, 06:28 PM
Jojorenee, I like your ups!!! ;). They are great. I loved creative written too but
Unlike u my grammar wasn't so great lol!! Keep building on that positive btw.
Have u seen the manga autobiiography about an unexpected Life? Liking ppl
Is a great part of life too.

I had problems with some teachers too. Sometimes getting notes from
Others or reading the book help. As I said, I was not a consistent student. :(. Exactly
like you, I thoughjt I could and sometimes if I was interested, I did. Getting
assignments done on time was a huge problem for me!!!

There are some tricks you can try to increase your interest. If you look
At most things as the cliche goes, they are connected!!! Patterns allow
us to be lazy. Facts are boring patterns are not. A wondering mind can
Find connections if u look?

IWhat sort of things might I expect to learn? How do I think an answer might
Look? How does it work?

Following a formula was boring as hell for me. The text book told me why
It worked! That was better. Sometimes reading the text book was boring
too! Was there a summary? Were parts high lighhted?

My memory sucked so I learned to derive as many of the fomulas as possible

KronarTheBlack
10-18-11, 07:19 PM
KronarTheBlack

Compare apples with apples. Deafness or blindness might be a good example
Cancer is a really bad example. Schtizophrenia would also be a bad example.

So you believe that deafness and blindness are apples to apples for ADHD and schitzophrenia should not be in the same class? I will admit that cancer was a bad example but who are you to judge the severity of any disease that impairs someone? I would not choose to have any disease or illness if I could. That seems to be simple logic to me.

I think you should become deaf and blind so you can go enlighten people who are deaf and blind and tell them how much of a gift it is to have no sight or hearing and how they are more creative than other people because of their deficiencies. They could more creative sometimes because they are forced to do things differently than a normal person when a situation arises where they cannot do it the same way a normal person could.


Also remember there are two strategies here that represent different paradigms
1). Work against one's ADHD
2). Work with your ADHD

I think most people use aspects of both. !BOTH ARE Valid strategies


Only two strategies to treat ADHD? You have got it covered for sure. I can think of a lot more than only two strategies there are probably thousands if not more.

You are not a bad person, if you find a way to reduce your ADHD.

You are not a bad person, if you find ways to accomodate or channel your ADHD
Into something constructive


Agreed

For me, the discovery that some people have used the tenencies that tripped me up
In. Constructive ways, is revolutionary.

Your opinion is that you think you can use ADHD to be more constructive and it makes you more creative.


You don't know you would be as creative without your ADHD. You mighjht be
But the point is lateral thinking is more natural for people with adhd.

You don;t know that you are more creative because you have ADHD you just think that you are. So it is an opinion with no scientific basis.

As for focus? Adhd is a paradox. When we hyperfocus, we focus more than others.
Sometimes this is bad; the reason I don't drive is I'm scared of zoning out. Other times
That same tendecy has served me well, when I was interestesd in somewthing.

Please show me the evidence that someone who hyperfocuses with ADHD focuses "MORE" than others.

You have ADHD. Its good; you know you have it. If you have a strategy fdor deaing with
that knowledge which it sounds like you do, that's better. Other strategies exist.
If you ever decide to try them, they are there

Are you trying to become an inspirational speaker? What is the point of this comment?

Back to deafness. If you want an experience, go to a deaf chat room and tell them hearing
Implants are great, asl is obsolete and they can all become regular people! Also
Mention that you are glad they don't have to remain disabed. They will get really
****** off becuase most of them love their deaf culture and hate being imposed
On by the hearing

Really? If you did a survey and asked 1000 deaf people if they could choose to have been born with normal hearing I am pretty positive most would rather be able to hear.

Don't get mad, get thoughtful. We have adhd. Each of us chooses the path suituing
Us best or we try to.

If it matters to u, I've been tripped up too. I'm not you but differing perspectives exist. Science does
Not totally understand us. Trhey are working on it

I think all the time. Your perspective is a minority. Think about that.

rickymooston
10-19-11, 12:38 AM
"If you did a survey and asked 1000 deaf people if they could choose to have been born with normal hearing I am pretty positive most would rather be able to hear."

The organizations below represent a lot more than "1000" deaf people. Their message is pretty uniform. "We have a culture, we have an identity and we are proud of it". Obviously there exists deaf people who disagree with this view; Many deaf people do for example voluntarily get hearing implants. Like I said, ask some deaf people yourself; their answers surprised me and perhaps they will surprise you as well.

http://www.cad.ca/index_en.php <--- Canadian association for the deaf

Audism can be seen in two general aspects. One is the assumption or belief that people who are deaf must be encouraged (or even forced) to become as much like non-deaf people as possible. The other is to assume control over deaf people, to disempower them, by making decisions about their language(s), their education, the services they will need, and so on, with limited or no input by the D/deaf person and the Deaf communityAudism can be seen in two general aspects.
...
The assumption that D/deaf people must become like non-Deaf people involves a repudiation of Sign language and the Deaf culture, a fixation upon “overcoming” the deafness, zealous promotion of “hearing” and speaking, and a pathological attitude towards deafness. It also implicitly includes the belief that a person who cannot hear is ipso facto inferior to those who can


http://www.nad.org/
http://www.nad.org/nltc/workshop-abstracts-presenter-bios National Institute for the deaf

Right-sizing the budget for ISD is an euphemism for "taking the state dollars away from currently allocated programs of bilingual education and putting it towards to exclusive listening and spoken languages" which expressly forbids ASL and any contact with the Deaf community and our culture


http://www.bda.org.uk/
http://www.bda.org.uk/event/item/culture-night-belfast

The British Deaf Association is the largest Deaf-led organisation in the UK. We represent the British Sign Language community, which is united by shared experiences, history and, most importantly, by language. We celebrate Deaf Culture, Deaf Identity and British Sign Language.



http://www.deafau.org.au/download/constitution.pdf

"deaf" includes any person with a hearing loss who uses sign language. The first
letter in the word "Deaf" is capitalised when referring to the Deaf Community, Deaf
Culture or Deaf Language. It is not capitalised when referring to physical deafness.
...
1.18 To foster [/b]pride[/b] in the Deaf Community, its language and culture.



As for schitzophrenia? I have two friends afflicted with the disease and I have ADHD myself. I have known several blind people, some people in wheel chairs and the like. Many of these people were extremely inspirational. There is a reason that I feel its worse; you don't have to agree with my subjective conclusion. Thank God for medication; without it, my friend, who is on disability, he probably would be looked into a mental hospital for the rest of his life.

ADHD is a disability. I don't think its a disease. Its ok if you disagree.

I consider schitzophrenia, untreated one of the worst diseases a person can get. Its very scary to imagine a world where you can't tell what is real and what is not. It was devastating to my friends. While I don't deny, I've been depressed and even severely depressed, I was most definitely not dealing with something worse. Most people with unmedicated ADHD do not require permanent hospitalization. I say this based on the experiences of my friends, both of whom were arrested. One of them, was lying outside naked, delirious. The other was having a halicination when he assaulted a police officer ...

My Mentor in my first "real job" was blind. He was o.k with it and often joked about thinking in 3D. Great guy.

rickymooston
10-19-11, 01:27 AM
I'm just not clear on how I can channel a neurological condition in my brain.

Thinking about some of the comments above, I probably should have phrased things differently. :(

Based on your understanding of said neurological condition, if you adapt or if you do things that are more natural to you, then you are doing the sort of thing I was thinking about.

When I want to brain storm, I just let my "ADHD mind go". I consider it channeling and I think I do it better than the average person in my team. (The proper way to brain storm is to generate ideas rather than to get bogged down by the details).

When I want to focus at work to get things done, even when its quiet, even when I'm alone, I often put on my hearing protectors and once I do get into it, I hyperfocus. I consider the hyperfocusing to be channeling to but it might be adapting which is also great.

I'm told some people with a larger "H" component, sometimes channel their energy into sprint like activities like sales or sports.

Sometimes, I feel my brain is just "firing", I meditate by staring at a blank wall or taking a walk.

When I'm really stuck on a problem, I fidget, pace and allow myself to enter deep into my own zone. The fidgeting and pacing works for me.

I use caffiene. That calms me and helps me focus.