View Full Version : Is it normal to obsess and ruminate when you have bipolar?


sybil
10-27-11, 08:30 AM
I was told by a psychiatrist that I probably have borderline ADD and borderline bipolar disorder. I can be very hyper so I think he means ADHD. I just told him that my main problem is getting extremely bored. I cannot handle being bored.

Is it normal to obsess about things and people, and to ruminate when you have bipolar? Is getting bored very easily another symptom of bipolar?

lbeezy
10-27-11, 02:08 PM
I am Bipolar I and have ADHD. I definitely obsess about things and people, and also ruminate. I'm not sure though if these are symptoms of Bipolar, ADHD or a whole different problem in it self. I know that many people with Bipolar disorder are introverted or in other words concerned with the inner world of mind. I think that always thinking to yourself can create these obsessions and also cause one to ruminate. Racing thoughts are a symptom of Bipolar disorder. These obsessions could worsen when one is having racing thoughts. There could be some correlation between having racing thoughts and obsessing over something.. Some experts call Bipolars "The Intelligent Loner" because some social anxiety is coupled with Bipolar disorder, and many people who are Bipolar keep to themselves. In my case when ever I am around large groups of people racing thoughts can sometimes be triggered and I begin to obsess about the people around me and if there looking at me or talking about me, sometimes I even worry that someone might be spying on me. In regard to your question about ruminate, I find myself to be introverted and this can cause me to ruminate. I can be sitting in a room full of people conversing and I might have an idea to contribute but i'll keep these thoughts to myself and just sit and think about them. I will zone out into the world of my brain and not give any attention to the people around me. You said that you find yourself getting bored easily. In my case I will get all hyped up and focus all my attention on one thing, usually something that I find pleasurable, then i'll loose interest in a day or a week, I never know, but many people with Bipolar disorder have reported this same experience.

On the other hand when I'm manic I'm almost the exact opposite of this. I feel like I can no longer keep my thoughts and ideas locked away in my head, and I have to go out and share them with world. When I'm manic I become much more sociable, I think everybody loves me and I'm just the smartest guy in the world. I sometimes get more paranoid when I'm manic though. My manic episodes are usually shorter than my depressed or normal moods. Im defiantly not at myself when manic.


This is just my experience and maybe you can relate.
I have been diagnosed as Bipolar I, two times, but unfortunately there is no xray you can get of your brain that shows whether you are Bipolar or not. I find that I have to put a lot of trust in my doctor and hope he knows what he is doing.

lbeezy
10-27-11, 02:55 PM
I wanted to ad that when I'm manic, I either feel like I can conquer the world (Euphoria) or I feel like there's a demon inside me trying to bust out of my skin (dysphoria). I sometimes experience racing thoughts so intense that I am completely unable to function. Sometimes I will experience both in the same manic episode. So basically in my experience mania can be awesome or it can be a living hell.

hollywood
10-28-11, 09:07 AM
being stuck or ruminating is totally separate from adhd . Usually it can be associated with an executive function gliche in those with adhd and unipolar "normal' depression. The depression then leads to anxiety and guess what's on your mind,,,...dum dum dum dummm!! Yes, you got it that one thing that your stuck in life or obessed about changing. Hey people, guess what just because it has a clinical term doesn't mean your all of a sudden ocd. It means your stuck and you don't know how to alleviate or resolve the issue. Being stuck everyday creates habituative mental thought patterns and before too long guess what your thinking about , it's the problem you haven't resolved. It's totally normal and it happens to anybody who is in a situation that they hate and do not know how to resolve or change or get out of .Similar to a nightmare of a job where your bored and have little opportunity and find yourself wasting time. You begin to isolate your thoughts on escape and avoid daily tasks because your not happy. Turns out this what happens in normal brains when they don't like what they are doing. This is not ocd or bi polar.

lbeezy
10-28-11, 02:23 PM
This may very well be true. Anxiety, emotions and mood shifts are all "normal" to some degree and this should be remembered before one starts self diagnosing, but there is an invisible line in there that can be crossed and become not normal.

"It means your stuck and you don't know how to alleviate or resolve the issue. Being stuck everyday creates habituative mental thought patterns and before too long guess what your thinking about , it's the problem you haven't resolved. It's totally normal and it happens to anybody who is in a situation that they hate and do not know how to resolve or change or get out of" (hollywood)

It seems like your talking about a very specific situation here and I'm not exactly sure how you linked it to "Sybil's" question.

I'm not saying that anyone is Bipolar. I do know that research has shown that many people with Bipolar have general anxiety, social anxiety and other phobias. The link between the two is not completely known, but it's not uncommon for someone who is Bipolar to also have high levels of anxiety. It depends on the individual if the symptoms of Bipolar are creating anxiety or if the anxiety is a separate problem in itself. I'm talking about anxiety here because you mentioned OCD and OCD is an emergency response to high levels of anxiety. Some people with Bipolar disorder turn to alcohol to cope with high levels of anxiety instead of developing OCD. So it is not impossible for someone who is Bipolar to have high levels of anxiety and then cope with there anxiety by developing OCD. This is not completely unheard of.

I want to repeat that I'm not diagnosing anyone Bipolar, I'm not a doctor, I'm just sharing my experience and some facts I know.

sarahsweets
10-28-11, 04:38 PM
Hollywood I don't think the op was referring to ocd. I also disagree with your opinion about ruminating etc not being connected with adhd. Because there is a problem with executive function it makes sense that this impairment could carry over and cause this excessive worrying or obsession. We also have emotional regulations problems so a small thing gets stuck in our heads and we go over and over it almost in circles. This is not how "normal " brains work. Normal brains can think, compartmentalize it and move on.

lbeezy
10-28-11, 08:12 PM
well said, sarahsweets