View Full Version : Adhd f.a.q.


pechemignonne
10-30-11, 10:16 PM
Say someone had a blog. And say that person also had ADHD.

ADHD + blog

Now say that person wanted to post an ADHD F.A.Q. (Frequently Asked Questions).

ADHD + blog = ADHD F.A.Q.

What would you think would be the most important questions to ask, and what would your answers be?

i.e. What do you think are the most important things people should know about ADHD, and what do you think are the most common misconceptions about ADHD?

(Since this is for my blog, and I'm not a "gifter", please refrain from "Why ADHD is a gift" posts, and post on other subjects related to ADHD if you are a "gifter", thanks!)

(yes, I am asking for you to help me write my blog)

Marzipan
10-30-11, 10:42 PM
Seeing as how ADHD medications are still illegal after the age of 18 in some countries, I think there is still a huge misconception that ADHD goes away in the majority of cases after childhood.

Also, that you have to be visibly and disruptively hyperactive to have the disorder.

Tying into the above, if comments in internet news stories, etc., are any indication, there's a massive misconception that ADHD only causes problems for other people around the individual diagnosed and not for that person him/herself.

The "boys are far more likely than girls to have ADHD" misconception.

"Girls are more likely to be ADHD/PI, boys ADHD/H-I"

"ADHD is primarily caused by environmental factors, such as bad parenting, a poor diet, too much TV, etc." and "ADHD is caused by our fast-paced modern lifestyle"

And on that note, "Better/harsher discipline, X fad diet, Y vitamin supplement will 'cure' ADHD"

"All ADHD medications are new drugs that may be dangerous to children because there have never been any long term studies"

"Individuals with ADHD have a higher/lower IQ than the general population"

etc.

Edit: I don't know how I'd answer these, I just thought I'd brainstorm a little. :)

bbsmith7777
10-31-11, 04:57 AM
Lots of questions about drugs and experimenting with changes. I would just remind people to be very careful when doing so, regardless of what they know other people have done. It's good to ask questions in forums and to know what others think, but one should always run their ideas by their doctor and/or a pharmacist too, before actually trying anything different. They may know something about your medical history and/or other medications you are on that is very relevant/important. And especially regarding stimulants, watching blood pressure for any changes is a must. If someone causes themself a stroke, nobody will care what someone on the forums had previously stated was a safe thing to do.

pechemignonne
10-31-11, 10:06 AM
Thanks for your responses!!

Marzipan: those are excellent!!

bbsmith: Sorry, I should have clarified, I meant FAQ written for people who probably don't have ADHD... But those are very good suggestions to think about for us ADHDers!!

sarahsweets
10-31-11, 10:11 AM
Can they be humorous? I don't want to be a smart *** if you dont want that.

rickymooston
11-01-11, 12:14 AM
What do you think are the most important things people should know about ADHD


0. Good reference sources on ADHD. Ones backed by people with solid research credentials rather than single best selling authors
1. Symptom comparisons. For example, I spent 2 hours looking for my hat, only to realize I was wearing it. Is that "me" or my ADHD? I almost burned my house down, (no joke), because I didn't notice my blanket was touching a light bulb
2. What symptoms are ADHD and which ones relate to co-morbid conditions. Co-ordination problems[i have this], Tics[ i have this], anxiety, depression [sometimes have this but most of the time I'm fortunate that its not major], ...
3. ADHD vs Autism? How to tell the difference
4. ADHD vs Bi-polar how to tell the difference
5. ADHD diagnosis : in children in adults what is being done now.
6. How well established is some of the newer research on the ADHD diagnosis is; e.g., MRI imaging and QEEG readings.
7. The latest consensus on ADHD and how well understood it is.
8. How do I know ADHD isn't being over diagnosed? Evidence?
9. Any references on biofeedback and its clinical trials?
10. references to information about various drugs, what sort of things they treat, possible side effects, degrees of addiction, etc etc
11. Academic reviews on the works of best selling authors
12. An academic response to the book "ADHD is a Fraud", link to.
13. Drugs and addictions
14. links to research supporting possible causes of adhd
15. genius vs adhd comparison : some people who are geniuses are bored in classes because
16. Links to studies about the effectiveness of omega 3? What restrictions?
17 What foods if any cause ADHD; e.g., the red food coloring myth.




(Since this is for my blog, and I'm not a "gifter", please refrain from "Why ADHD is a gift" posts, and post on other subjects related to ADHD if you are a "gifter", thanks!)


I don't think anybody thinks "ADHD is a gift"; what some people think is, some (not all) of the negative symptoms of ADHD can be positive in some circumstances. If ADHD were truly a gift, none of us would be on this forum. Obviously, a symptom such as "anxiety" or "depression", if those symptoms are really the ADHD (or a response to ADHD related failures) rather than co-morbid conditons, don't have "positives". I can't see a positive in being so disorganized that your room looks like a bomb hit it or having no sense of time at all.

This gifter idea isn't a religion by the way. Some people exist with ADHD, who have found niches were they functioned well; it goes without saying that they functioned poorly in the mainstream and that there maybe be some people who this sort of approach wouldn't work for. Most of us haven't. A huge number of people are "in between". Having unbalanced lives where one area is "ok" and another sorely neglected, we cheat and get by effectively sweeping things under the rug. I can more or less hold a good job, my room looks like hell, I neglect many areas in my life and I work lots of over time. An example of such a person, would be the author of driven to dstraction, she has ADHD. I don't believe she uses meds but I can be wrong. The authors of "You are not lazy, ...", apparently do use meds ...

pechemignonne
11-01-11, 12:16 AM
Can they be humorous? I don't want to be a smart *** if you dont want that.
Absolutely!! I promise to quote and give credit!

Marzipan
11-01-11, 12:18 AM
I don't know if you've read this yet, but this is one of the best and most comprehensive screeners I've been able to find.

http://www.divacenter.eu/DIVA.aspx?id=503