View Full Version : How do you get exempted from going to class in University?


Massari
11-05-11, 12:29 PM
So here is the thing. I never go to my classes because I never learn anything. I can't listen to someone talk for more then 30 seconds. The problem is that the smart azz professors found a way to upset persons like me by taking attendance, doing surprize quizzes and other type of sadness. Besides, the University policy is that if I don't go to 80% of my classes, I can't write my final.

Well I think that's a fkn waste of my time, I could use that time to learn something by reading the book by myself, instead of wasting my time listening to the fool talk for 1h 30. Everything I learned so far I learned from books and personal practice. Is there some sort of exemption to exempt me from going to class and avoid losing points every time simply because my name is not on the attendance sheet?

thx

TygerSan
11-05-11, 12:41 PM
Sadly I'm not sure that's possible :(

My smart a$$ed reply is to go somewhere where there isn't an attendance policy (like a larger school . . . I know some of the larger British universities don't give a crap whether you show up to lecture or not, as long as you go to your tutorial, for example).

selita
11-05-11, 01:16 PM
I don't think so. Even if it feels like a waste of time it's going to impact how much you learn. Even if you get 5 extra points on your exam, it could make the difference between a B and an A, or an F and a D. You'll waste your tuition and time and all the time you spend studying independently if you don't squeeze as much learnin' as possible out of these people.

The proportions vary but I've had exams that were entirely based on the lectures and only used textbooks for supplementation. One prof assigned several books, but really taught everything based on a book that she didn't assign! You will also miss out on other students' questions and assignment instructions.

I would just go to class and try to occupy your hands. Half the time I would end up doodling or playing solitaire while listening with one ear, and taking notes if something sounded important. In high school I would write stories on one side of the paper and take notes on the other side. I can't just "sit and listen." I start falling asleep.

In retrospect I probably would have learned a lot more if I'd been medicated but I did get a lot out of the lectures. If possible get a copy of the lecture notes or slides beforehand and take notes on it.

Some profs are more interesting than others... ask questions and participate in any discussions.

rickymooston
11-05-11, 04:15 PM
So here is the thing. I never go to my classes because I never learn anything.


I skipped 99% of my classes in university. In most classes they didn't care. That was here in Canada.

Some profs were mean and taught stuff not in the text books. I hated that too


I can't listen to someone talk for more then 30 seconds.


This can be a problem later in life tho.

Are you diagnosed with ADHD?

Why don't you ask in your disabled student center?




The problem is that the smart azz professors found a way to upset persons like me by taking attendance, doing surprize quizzes and other type of sadness. Besides, the University policy is that if I don't go to 80% of my classes, I can't write my final.


I disagree with that policy.


Well I think that's a fkn waste of my time, I could use that time to learn something by reading the book by myself, instead of wasting my time listening to the fool talk for 1h 30. Everything I learned so far I learned from books and personal practice. Is there some sort of exemption to exempt me from going to class and avoid losing points every time simply because my name is not on the attendance sheet?
thx

I feel your pain.

hellokate
11-05-11, 05:18 PM
Speaking as someone who works with students in a large Canadian university, I will respectfully disagree with rickymooston and tell you; dude, you gotta go to class. The fact that lectures are scheduled means they are important. If you skip them you're missing an important part of the process; students benefit and perform better from attending lectures and participating in class activities and discussions than by just reading notes and textbooks. Your degree will not be worth much to you or to any future employers if you only do half the work you need to get it. It also diminishes the value of other students' work if an institution allows students to skip class on a regular basis, and ultimately destroys the value of the institution itself if it doesn't maintain some kind of standard.

Do you feel you're not learning anything just from the lecture, or from the class in general? Maybe you could talk to your instructor or a learning centre on campus to see what can help make lectures easier to handle. Maybe the issue is you need to look around and find something that interests you more, or a program that's structured differently, like one by correspondence or something more practical and hands-on if you don't like sitting still. Although higher education is a great thing, not everybody should go to a university to get it, and not every type of program can be taught in a university setting. I appreciate your frustration, and Lord, I have known some professors to be enormous fools in my time, but really, you're doing yourself a huge disservice by playing hooky.

ETA: Just looked at your profile and saw you're a Chemical Engineering student, and I'm guessing you have an interest in the oil & gas industry. DUDE. You're training to be a professional engineer! And do work that may affect people's livelihoods and safety LIVES and stuff! You're probably attending a school with an accredited engineering program, which is accredited for a reason. I work in an engineering faculty, and I can tell you for sure that what you do in school now is going to hound you for the rest of your life. Get some help if you need it, and GO TO CLASS.

Massari
11-05-11, 07:34 PM
Speaking as someone who works with students in a large Canadian university, I will respectfully disagree with rickymooston and tell you; dude, you gotta go to class. The fact that lectures are scheduled means they are important. If you skip them you're missing an important part of the process; students benefit and perform better from attending lectures and participating in class activities and discussions than by just reading notes and textbooks. Your degree will not be worth much to you or to any future employers if you only do half the work you need to get it. It also diminishes the value of other students' work if an institution allows students to skip class on a regular basis, and ultimately destroys the value of the institution itself if it doesn't maintain some kind of standard.

Do you feel you're not learning anything just from the lecture, or from the class in general? Maybe you could talk to your instructor or a learning centre on campus to see what can help make lectures easier to handle. Maybe the issue is you need to look around and find something that interests you more, or a program that's structured differently, like one by correspondence or something more practical and hands-on if you don't like sitting still. Although higher education is a great thing, not everybody should go to a university to get it, and not every type of program can be taught in a university setting. I appreciate your frustration, and Lord, I have known some professors to be enormous fools in my time, but really, you're doing yourself a huge disservice by playing hooky.

ETA: Just looked at your profile and saw you're a Chemical Engineering student, and I'm guessing you have an interest in the oil & gas industry. DUDE. You're training to be a professional engineer! And do work that may affect people's livelihoods and safety LIVES and stuff! You're probably attending a school with an accredited engineering program, which is accredited for a reason. I work in an engineering faculty, and I can tell you for sure that what you do in school now is going to hound you for the rest of your life. Get some help if you need it, and GO TO CLASS.

My rhythm of understanding in class is so slow, that if followed, even the best professors wouldn't be able to finish even half of the material by December so they can't stop and wait for me to click. After only a few minutes I lose the professor and the rest of the class I just sit ''waiting for the bell to ring''

It's a language thing. I can only follow people in an oral conversation for a long time in my mother tongue only. When it's french or English, I easily lose someone in a lengthy oral explanation. It's not a language level thing either. I graduated from a french system baccalaureate with ''mention bien'', and whoever does that, by definition knows 5x more french than any other french Canadian so it's not a language problem. It's only when someone speaks to me. Half the words just go by and like...don't strike me in any way like, I have to think about them to realize what the person meant. It's like a lag.

Sometimes I skip a whole sentence and I have to recall it in my mind and see what the person meant. It never happens in my mother tongue, where each word impacts me instantly and I basically can't lose the person talking because every word hits me and keeps me on.

rickymooston
11-05-11, 07:34 PM
Speaking as someone who works with students in a large Canadian university, I will respectfully disagree with rickymooston and tell you; dude, you gotta go to class.


The OP is American and is going to apparently, (assuming he can't get an exception), fail for not going to class. Obviously, in said case, he either has to go to class or get an exception. I recommended him to go to the disabled student center who would presumeably give him better advice or help than I can. I assume, if they were going to recommend him going to class they may also have suggestions to manage his ADHD.


What I said was, with the exception of very interactive classes, I didn't feel I benefited from a large number of classes, in my undergrad of my first degree ...

Our school generally gave us the option of chosing whether to attend classes or not. This seemed to allow people to chose their learning style. But again, depends on the class.

Exceptions included:
1) Very interactive classes such as a 4th year graph theory class I took
2) Language classes
3) Small classes with discussion groups

In the undergrad, a lot of the classes had about 300+ people in them. The teachers were uninspired and uninterested reading from 20 year old notes and often from my point of view at the time, torturing the students. I'm being evil and honest here.

i did however, regret not attending an early morning calcuus class. Truth is, the teacher was awesome and was one of the hardest teachers I ever had. His explanations in classs were good. I still learned the class tho from the book which suited me. It wasn't "ignoring the work" for that course. I beleive I did o.k. in it but I forgot.
I found, for my learning style at the time, the text books much better thought out and much better suited to me.

Of course, one rather poor teacher, (in my biased opinion), intentionally put in extra which was torture for me because I had a hell of a time taking notes, when I was in fact attending.

Noted that, I had poorly managed undiagnosed ADHD at the time. My assignments were always late and I was very poor in the labs. Often, during labs I was doing labs.


Your degree will not be worth much to you or to any future employers if you only do half the work you need to get it.


I'm not sure that in many cases this is true but i could be wrong. That is, I'm not sure if in many cases attending lectures is useful but it depends on the lectures.

Another thing I found useless that lots of teachers love were multiple choice exams.

Perhaps i'm giving bad advice as you said. I replied on my gut, reasonating with similar feelings. Shoot me.

Massari
11-05-11, 07:45 PM
My problem is only when someone talks...I can't follow him and I can't do something else either because it's bothering me when someone talks...I can't concentrate.

Massari
11-05-11, 08:08 PM
ETA: Just looked at your profile and saw you're a Chemical Engineering student, and I'm guessing you have an interest in the oil & gas industry. DUDE. You're training to be a professional engineer! And do work that may affect people's livelihoods and safety LIVES and stuff! You're probably attending a school with an accredited engineering program, which is accredited for a reason. I work in an engineering faculty, and I can tell you for sure that what you do in school now is going to hound you for the rest of your life. Get some help if you need it, and GO TO CLASS.

And what's so special about the teacher? The teacher didn't invent anything. Whatever they talk about in class is a less accurate version of what they learned from a book, or from another teacher who also learned it from a book. I just go to the source. What's wrong with that?

Who's going to be better at solving problems in the industry? Someone who sat back and received knowledge on a silver platter from a teacher or someone who did personal research and found the knowledge himself? You think in the industry your boss is going to send you to class every time there's a problem to solve? He's gonna put a 2000 pages perry type book on your desk and ask you to figure it out yourself. There will be no teacher to write the solution on the board. It's just you and the book.

hellokate
11-07-11, 02:52 AM
My rhythm of understanding in class is so slow, that if followed, even the best professors wouldn't be able to finish even half of the material by December so they can't stop and wait for me to click. After only a few minutes I lose the professor and the rest of the class I just sit ''waiting for the bell to ring''

It's a language thing. I can only follow people in an oral conversation for a long time in my mother tongue only. When it's french or English, I easily lose someone in a lengthy oral explanation. It's not a language level thing either. I graduated from a french system baccalaureate with ''mention bien'', and whoever does that, by definition knows 5x more french than any other french Canadian so it's not a language problem. It's only when someone speaks to me. Half the words just go by and like...don't strike me in any way like, I have to think about them to realize what the person meant. It's like a lag.

Sometimes I skip a whole sentence and I have to recall it in my mind and see what the person meant. It never happens in my mother tongue, where each word impacts me instantly and I basically can't lose the person talking because every word hits me and keeps me on.

Okay, this makes things clearer. If you are having trouble processing information in the language of instruction (i.e. auditory comprehension) in addition to ADHD, then you absolutely need to get help with that. This is especially important if you hope to work in a country where the language is other than your mother tongue. People are not going to speak slowly to wait for you to catch up; I'm sorry. That may sound harsh, but you have chosen to enter a program that will lead to a profession where being a licensed members entails adhering to highly stringent regulations and a strict code of ethics. How well you are able to understand what people are communicating to you will absolutely have an effect on your carer.

I am not without sympathy--I used to study French and I had a terrible time with understanding what was said to me or what I heard from an audio or video clip. I could write and read it fairly well but was completely lost when I had to listen to something. I'm a visual learner and it sounds (no pun intended) like you may be, too. I also understand having to see the words in your head to understand what someone's saying--when I watched French movies I had to turn on the French subtitles, and reading along was the only way I could understand the film.

And what's so special about the teacher? The teacher didn't invent anything. Whatever they talk about in class is a less accurate version of what they learned from a book, or from another teacher who also learned it from a book. I just go to the source. What's wrong with that?

Who's going to be better at solving problems in the industry? Someone who sat back and received knowledge on a silver platter from a teacher or someone who did personal research and found the knowledge himself? You think in the industry your boss is going to send you to class every time there's a problem to solve? He's gonna put a 2000 pages perry type book on your desk and ask you to figure it out yourself. There will be no teacher to write the solution on the board. It's just you and the book.

I don't know what school you're going to, but if you're in Canada as your profile says, any university with an accredited engineering degree program recruits people who are or are expected to become licensed professional engineers in that province. Any instructor who is on the faculty at your school (a regular instructor, not a sessional hired to teach a particular course) is expected to teach AND do research. That means they are required to invent things and solve problems as a condition of their employment, so it's unfortunate that you seem dismissive of their training and expertise. Any classes that requires a textbook includes it as part of your educational experience and it is not meant to substitute for the whole.

It's not unusual for companies to request job applicants to submit post-secondary transcripts along with a resume and your lack of attendance will probably reflect itself in your marks and GPA. Yes, your future bosses will want you to figure out problems by reading and research, but you'll also need to verbally communicate with other people and work with them to solve problems. If you think students who attend classes are being spoon-fed their education, I have to say you have an extremely dim and arrogant view of those who will soon be your professional peers.

rickymooston
11-08-11, 08:16 AM
hellokate what if he is in fact an A student?

This was the infomation he gave me.

Some people learn differently. I thought his profile said texas.

Interctive classes are one thing but uninpsiring lectures are another

In my 15 years of working in computing science, i dont reclall requiring to set through long boring lecrtures too often

Getting work done on time on the other hand is crucial. Learning on your own as he claims to have done would be an awesome asset. We have to do that all the time

Now communication and team working skills are also crucial.

If he had no social skills that could be an issue.