View Full Version : My Lab Report on Genes that *may cause Autistic Disorders


Pamplemousse
11-09-11, 11:58 PM
So we did a biology lab on the genes that may cause or contribute to different types of disorders. I did mine on the Autism spectrum (and there's a little bit about ADHD thrown in there as well.)

Its's clearly not a professionally done report, so try not to judge it too hard. But anyways, here it is.

If anyone has problems opening the file, just let me know and I'll copy/paste the whole thing into a post (or at least try to....)

KronarTheBlack
11-10-11, 12:57 AM
I have only one objection to your well written report for a first year biology class and that is the statement "On occasion, there is a mutation in a gene, and the results are not desirable. When a gene is mutated, it usually results in some form of a disease"

Saying the results are not desirable directly conflicts the theory of evolution as mutations are what causes some members of species to thrive and others to die so they are not always undesirable. The "when a gene is mutated it usually results in some form of disease" is not true either. Genes mutate all the time its called survival of the fittest. Those with the best mutations win!

Pamplemousse
11-10-11, 12:57 PM
I have only one objection to your well written report for a first year biology class and that is the statement "On occasion, there is a mutation in a gene, and the results are not desirable. When a gene is mutated, it usually results in some form of a disease"

Saying the results are not desirable directly conflicts the theory of evolution as mutations are what causes some members of species to thrive and others to die so they are not always undesirable. The "when a gene is mutated it usually results in some form of disease" is not true either. Genes mutate all the time its called survival of the fittest. Those with the best mutations win!

True, instead of saying how mutations always end badly, I should have been more clear and saying "these types of mutations affect the functionality of the organism"

I understand where you are coming from. I think I had worded it like that because it was an entire investigation only on disorders. lol. But I probably could have been more clear. Thank you for the info. :)

Massari
11-16-11, 11:21 AM
I have only one objection to your well written report for a first year biology class and that is the statement "On occasion, there is a mutation in a gene, and the results are not desirable. When a gene is mutated, it usually results in some form of a disease"

Saying the results are not desirable directly conflicts the theory of evolution as mutations are what causes some members of species to thrive and others to die so they are not always undesirable. The "when a gene is mutated it usually results in some form of disease" is not true either. Genes mutate all the time its called survival of the fittest. Those with the best mutations win!

You're wrong dude, by a billion %. Since a mutation is a random change in DNA, it almost always results in a deadly form of cancer. The chance to obtain a useful mutation is so low that 10,000s of people die from cancer until one individual has, for example, the CD5 mutation making his immune cells resistant to HIV.

The benefit you are talking about applies to a population over 10,000s of years and not a single individual in a short time range!!! Nature and evolution are the friend of the human race, they are not your friend! They will get you killed!

Massari
11-16-11, 11:22 AM
True, instead of saying how mutations always end badly, I should have been more clear and saying "these types of mutations affect the functionality of the organism"

I understand where you are coming from. I think I had worded it like that because it was an entire investigation only on disorders. lol. But I probably could have been more clear. Thank you for the info. :)

Don't get intimidated rofl...defend your point. His argument makes zero sense.

Massari
11-16-11, 11:33 AM
If you take a look at the CD5 mutation that makes some Caucasians immune to HIV, you see that a whole leg of the receptor is gone! At first you go like woo, that can't be good! And it's not supposed to! In fact, it's only blind luck that it's even viable! If the mutation affected only 1/3 more of the remaining leg, the membrane would have failed and the subject died upon birth.

fracturedstory
11-23-11, 08:30 PM
Pamplemousse, I hope you don't mind if I make some spelling corrections. It just seems to be something that is important in essay writing.

It was very informative and easy for someone somewhat ignorant like me to understand.

Pamplemousse
11-27-11, 11:54 PM
Pamplemousse, I hope you don't mind if I make some spelling corrections. It just seems to be something that is important in essay writing.

It was very informative and easy for someone somewhat ignorant like me to understand.

Go head and make any corrections you wish! haha. My spelling is not so wonderful at times. :p

I am glad it was easy to understand. I had to sift through a lot of information to be able to understand any of it myself, and then finally transfer it to readable material on paper. :D

fracturedstory
11-29-11, 02:34 AM
Want to PM me your e-mail address?