View Full Version : Free 21-Day Guided Meditation


Unmanagable
12-01-11, 03:31 PM
Howdy folks,

The Deepak Chopra Center is once again offering a free 21-day guided meditation opportunity for anyone interested in giving it a try. This is the site and meditation that helped me realize just how beneficial it can be.

If the link isn't appropriate to keep on the thread, all you have to do is google chopra center free 21 day guided meditation and it should take you to their site.

I think many of you might enjoy it and/or be really surprised at just how easy it is to get into after all. I say this after years of trying to figure it out. If you're interested, hope you enjoy!


http://www.chopracentermeditation.com/bestsellers/ew_meditation/register.asp?af=615

Redrightnow
12-02-11, 12:23 AM
Thanks,will check that out!

StoicNate
12-02-11, 12:44 AM
Interesting. In truth, I don't think I ever meditated.

Unmanagable
12-02-11, 12:45 AM
I found it to be really helpful. I had no clue how awesome meditation could be and up until this point, felt like it was pretty much a bunch of malarkey. This was after many failed attempts prior to trying this. :)

You don't have to sit in an awkwardly uncomfortable position, be totally silent, and be able to totally clear your mind. They encourage comfort and let you know it's okay if your mind wanders. That was enough to convince me to hang out and try some more.

They offer a place you can take notes about your experience after each meditation; they ask specific questions afterwards (of course it's strictly voluntary if you want to answer them - or not) and that can also be printed out if you want to track your progress; if you miss a day or get a late start, there's a place to access the previous meditations so you don't miss out on any of them; they email you the meditation daily so the effort involved in getting to it is minimal in that it only takes a few clicks. All of this is available for a limited time after the 21 days are up. (The 21 days are based on the day they started it, not the day you join - I think they are currently on day 2 or 3)

I'm excited that they're offering it again and really hope folks who've been curious take time to give it a shot. There's absolutely nothing to lose but maybe 15-20 minutes of your time. But if it 'clicks' with you like it did with me, priceless gains can be made by feeling at least a little bit of inner peace and discovering awesome ways to bring a sense of calmness and understanding to light that you hadn't recognized before. :)

StoicNate
12-02-11, 12:51 AM
I'm going to try the challenge and see what happens. :D

Redrightnow
12-02-11, 10:33 AM
I signed up last night and did the first one after I got off here. It was very pleasant-- but I was drifting a bit because it was so late, then I fell asleep in the chair and woke up 30 minutes later. I think I heard the end of it, :p.

Will try again today-- with meds, and awake. :)

Abi
12-02-11, 11:07 AM
If cost is a measure of value, then this one is just about right, lol.

:p :cool:

Unmanagable
12-02-11, 03:09 PM
Always a pleasure to hear from you, Abi, whether you want it to be or not. :p :cool:

meadd823
12-06-11, 03:44 AM
You don't have to sit in an awkwardly uncomfortable position, be totally silent, and be able to totally clear your mind. They encourage comfort and let you know it's okay if your mind wanders. That was enough to convince me to hang out and try some more.




I find I meditated best when in motion - The ADHD form of meditation is trance dance. (http://neurotrance.org/the-history-and-purpose-of-the-trance-dance) Meditation like just about every thing suffers misunderstanding via inaccurate stereotyping by those who are unfamiliar with the benefits.

Unmanagable
07-16-12, 07:59 PM
They just started a new 21-day FREE guided meditation offer today.

All you have to do is register. You can do so through facebook, if you're a FB user.

The theme of this one is, "Free to Love" - and we could all use more love - especially for ourselves.

This is one of the few guided meditations that I've found beneficial in my life. I hope someone else can benefit from this, too.

http://www.chopracentermeditation.com/Bestsellers/LandingPage.aspx?BookId=169

CheekyMonkey
07-17-12, 12:17 AM
I'll try it. I'm worried about starting something else that I won't follow through on. Letting myself down is exhausting. :(

Unmanagable
07-17-12, 12:43 AM
I'll try it. I'm worried about starting something else that I won't follow through on. Letting myself down is exhausting. :(


I hear ya', Cheeks. I'm already behind a day. :lol:

They keep the previous day archived for a couple days or so to allow us to play catch up.......but then they disappear. I learned that pretty quickly, too. lol I haven't made it the full 21 days yet. :o

They have a section for notes, and i think I managed to follow through with that maybe 2 of the days. I prefer to just feel what I feel and roll with it vs. journaling about it. It messes up my flow, and then I don't look forward to the next time. It ends up "back on the shelf" for a while and the thrill is gone. :rolleyes:

I thought one of the coolest things about this guy's style (David Ji) is the way he reassures you that there is really no right or wrong way to meditate.....just find what works for you and do it when you can. And his voice is so soothing and calming. Wish he could be around the days I really wanna flip my wig. :lol:

I go in stages with it, but have to say I have noticed a lot of positive effects from it as time has passed. I've not yet been successful in being consistent with sitting still for that long, every day, on purpose.

However, just using the breathing techniques, ryhthm techniques from drumming, walking meditation, mantras, etc. throughout the day as needed is a huge help to me.

Hope ya' dig it, and if not, I hope it's at least entertaining. :)

CheekyMonkey
07-17-12, 01:21 AM
I hear ya', Cheeks. I'm already behind a day. :lol:

They keep the previous day archived for a couple days or so to allow us to play catch up.......but then they disappear. I learned that pretty quickly, too. lol I haven't made it the full 21 days yet. :o

They have a section for notes, and i think I managed to follow through with that maybe 2 of the days. I prefer to just feel what I feel and roll with it vs. journaling about it. It messes up my flow, and then I don't look forward to the next time. It ends up "back on the shelf" for a while and the thrill is gone. :rolleyes:

I thought one of the coolest things about this guy's style (David Ji) is the way he reassures you that there is really no right or wrong way to meditate.....just find what works for you and do it when you can. And his voice is so soothing and calming. Wish he could be around the days I really wanna flip my wig. :lol:

I go in stages with it, but have to say I have noticed a lot of positive effects from it as time has passed. I've not yet been successful in being consistent with sitting still for that long, every day, on purpose.

However, just using the breathing techniques, ryhthm techniques from drumming, walking meditation, mantras, etc. throughout the day as needed is a huge help to me.

Hope ya' dig it, and if not, I hope it's at least entertaining. :)


I can say that when I do yoga, it is extremely hard for me to find that focus, but once it is found it is very freeing. I don't know how I'll do with mediation, but people keep telling me that I need to meditate. :lol:

purpleToes
07-17-12, 07:31 AM
Thanks, I've been interested in meditation for a while but haven't been able to get into it. Maybe this structured thing will work for me. I signed up tonight.

Bluerose
07-18-12, 08:30 AM
Thanks for the link.

I love it. It might be worth checking out the free session just for a refresher course.

If you haven’t done meditation you haven’t been fully awake.

Sandy4957
07-21-12, 12:20 PM
Ok, so I've been trying this one, and it's pretty well tailored to my situation, but I'm pretty bad at it. I'm not sure if it's a PTSD problem, or what. :( I don't blame the program. It seems to be a problem with me. :(

Bluerose, maybe you can help me figure out how to do this, because it's very frustrating to me that I can't seem to make use of these sorts of things. You seem to have figured it out. :)

Today's meditation was about release and cutting ties to things that were painful. So I used (as an image) the experience that I had when my former law partners were betraying me. One guy in particular (our managing partner) really dropped the ball, because he knew that the guy that I call "Mr. Corner Office" had a reason to be lying about me. Granted, the managing partner didn't know how Mr. Corner Office might have figured out that I was a complainant (because the managing partner was too stupid to imagine that Mr. Corner Office might have intimidated the victim into telling him), but the managing partner should have raised a red flag and did not.

I mean, the only way that a reporting system can work is if people in those positions are capable of recognizing and managing possible retaliation. And of course it was ludicrous to think of this idiot (the managing partner) being able to do that. He's dumber than a box of rocks.

But he betrayed me. He liked me, and he betrayed me because betraying me was easier than standing up to Mr. Corner Office.

Thing is, the managing partner is supposed to be this big Evangelical Christian. He prays OVER people and ****, and the hypocrisy of that makes me insane. It makes me insane that people like that engage in their sanctimonious crap, yet don't have the courage to, say, call me up (after I'd signed a release) and say, "I failed you, and for that I'm sorry." There are so many of my former partners who now know that they sided with the wrong guy, and they may believe that they had no other choice (I get that part), but they could still apologize to me for the fact that they were trapped. And yet, to date, only one of them has had the courage to do that. (What's amazing, there, is that she didn't even know the details, at the time. She just apologized for the SITUATION. Why? BECAUSE SHE HAS COURAGE! :mad: Once she knew the details, she was furious.)

It's maddening to me. This happened, what, over four years ago now, and yet whenever I do an exercise like this, I am RIGHT BACK IN IT. I am shaking as I type this. :( What do I have to do to make it end? :(

It makes me so tired. :( Nothing works for me. I don't seem to have any ability to step away from my coping mechanism for this sort of stuff, which is anger. Fury, really. At the time that this happened, I could have shot Mr. Corner Office right between the eyes and felt NOTHING. :mad:

Ok, I'm lying. I would have felt joy. I *******' fantasize about it, and I feel joy, whenever I think of it. :(

I can hold it together 99% of the time. But that 1% is very dark. :o

Bluerose
07-23-12, 09:51 AM
Sandy,

Hi! Hope you're well.

That sounds like an awful situation to be dealing with. I have to say that perhaps due to my 'successful' meditation I would not be able to get involved with that situation or anything like it.

Meditation isn't an overnight cure for anything. But once you have the hang of it things just seem to fall into place.

The effect meditation has had on me is something like this... It's like I haven't talked for a long time and now I find myself being dragged into a situation where I'm forced to stick up for myself. It's painful and exhausting and I begin to take a step back and realise that these people will go on (and on) whether I'm there or not.

We can observe rather than react, we can look to see what is and what isn't our problem. I can only imagine the situation you speak of. And I imagine myself looking at each one of those people and wondering what their problem is. Even if their problem is with me - it's their problem not mine. I imagine myself watching and listening and checking out just what is actually going on here. And then... I simply walk away.

Today's meditation was about release and cutting ties to things that were painful.

This is important but it doesn't happen overnight. The meditation course is teaching how to meditate. The real work begins when you start meditating for real.

Letting go isn’t easy. It took me ten years to forgive my mother and twenty years to forgive my father. But remember, I'm talking about a time before home computers and all the information we are now able to access. I lived out of librarys and book stores. My real healing began when I was able to access the internet and compare my story with other people's stories and gather and share advice. Like we're doing now. So thankfully and hopefully you won't have to wait that long for some peace. :)

Reading your post made me think of something Byron Katie said. Check out her books and videos on youtube. She's brilliant about describing how to let go of all the baggage.

She asks, "Think. Who would you be without your story?"

I believe the answer to be a gentle loving, considerate person. Our story made us who we are. If we don't like who we are becoming we can change it by changing how we perceive our story - and the people involved in it. I changed mine by putting into perspective the fact that my parents were children struggling to bring up children. My mum was 17 when she had me, my dad was just a few years older. He spent his life in and out of prison until he killed himself at age 41. My mum was left with five kids at age 36.

It helps to stop being angry and work instead to put things into perspective. And therein we find understanding, and with understanding comes peace.

Byron Katie says someone might hurt and upset you but it's your thoughts about the situation that can grow out of proportion and hurt you more.


"Hating someone is a thought. That person isn't hateful. It's your thought that is hateful. You are thinking hateful things. You believe what you think. But what you think is wrong. And you believe that person is hateful but it is just a thought. Putting the hateful thought to one side, is that person really a hateful person? Does everyone hate them? Who would you be without that hateful thought?" - Byron Katie


It takes time. But it will come. And in the meantime, becoming aware of your thoughts and working to replace the anger with understanding can help.

Look again at the situation.... It sounds like more than one person isn't particularly happy with their job at that office.

Sitting for beginners can be torture. I found repeating an affirmation helped. Something about relaxing and letting go. If nothing else it serves to occupy your mind until the Crap stops trying to get your attention.

Not sure how helpful that will be. :)

Check out Byron Katie, see if that helps.

Rose

Sandy4957
07-25-12, 04:18 PM
:thankyou:

Thanks very much for the feedback, Bluerose.

You know, the thing is that I've been able to do all of the things that you describe with my mother (who was physically and emotionally abusive, and who didn't believe me about sexual abuse by her boyfriend), and my father (who died beating me). I have a harder time with this because I don't actually CARE about these people as people. I don't have much incentive to try to put myself in their shoes OTHER THAN as a way of letting go for myself.

And even so, I can still comprehend their problems. One, for example, is extremely co-dependent. She lives her life in fear of anyone labeling her a "bad girl," and she'll go to great lengths to prove that she's "better" than someone who has fallen into disfavor. Never mind that her efforts to protect herself may perpetuate an injustice. She's a coward.

I can picture them all as damaged, primarily as cowards, because that's what they were. I can sort of forgive the cowardice. Sort of.

But particularly when it comes to Mr. Corner Office, I have no story to tell myself that helps to humanize him. I've become convinced that he's a sociopath. He went after me because I dared to criticize him. I didn't kowtow sufficently. I judged him negatively for the comment to the subordinate (he told her that the sight of her made him want to whack off). And in the end, I "knew" him. I saw what was behind the mask, and he didn't like that. Even if I view him as a human being, it's not a human being who operates from any sort of socially acceptable position. He's unkind. He hurts people because it serves him. I think he even likes it a little bit.

I remember things like how proud he was of his daughter that she gave away her mutt dog (which she had rescued) because he made her do that in order to "earn" a show dog. Did she need to "make space" in the home or the family finances for the show dog? No. Could she have kept both her beloved pet and the show dog? Of course. So why did he make her do that, given how incredibly painful it was for her and the rest of the family? Because he could. Because it proved her obedience to him. Everything that the man does is about making sure that he is obeyed, feared. He'd call that "respect."

So the only way that I can try to "forgive" or "accept" that part of the situation is to place some of the "blame" for it on myself. And my sense of self recoils from that. No matter which way I look at it, I can't say to myself, "I own part of this."

I got to the point where I can even "own" my hubby's having fallen in love with someone else. So I know how to move on past these sorts of things. But somehow this one is different.

And it's caustic. When I'm "triggered" by it, I seethe with anger. It oozes out of my pores. I stay angry and irritable for days. :(

I would like to purge myself of it. I just don't know how.

It doesn't help that every once in a while I run into these people. And their own guilt makes them feel the need to be friendly, which just sets me off. I've rebuffed them enough at this point that they stay away (now, four years later). But I still see them. We still drift past one another. I still have to pretend that they don't exist, because a casual conversation with them is unthinkable.

In my heart of hearts, I know that I've forgiven less forgivable things, but I can't seem to forgive this one, no matter how much I try. :( This is clearly a weakness on my part.

A piece of it is that karma hasn't paid all of them back yet. One of them died, so he's off the hook. (See how nasty I am!!! :eek: :o). But the others sail merrily along. Well, ok, they're not merry. They're all miserable in their own ways, even Mr. Corner Office. Mr. Corner Office hires prostitutes and kills computers with his porn habit. He's obviously completely estranged from his wife, who is ALWAYS on medication for extremely drug-resistant depression. He rolls his eyes when he talks about her, because her illness irritates him. (In fact, the closest that I can get to humanizing him is when I think about how he equated my ADHD with her depression, even though the latter included occasional psychosis. So he was uninformed, and prejudiced.) It's not like he's happy. But I suspect that he is, in part, the CAUSE of his wife's illness, because he's so toxic. And, in any event, he's not unhappy enough for me. :(

I'll look at Byron Katie.

So there you go, guys. Sandy may seem to have it together, but not ALL the time... :o

Bluerose
07-26-12, 02:24 PM
Sandy,

I hear you.

Sorry, I feel like I'm preaching to the converted here. I know you know all this. I just have to write it my way and ask you to take from it whatever you feel might be helpful. Okay? :)

The thing to be aware of is that when we feel we have got one situation sorted, we tend to sit back thinking we have fixed everything; figured out a way of dealing with anything that comes up. We’re sorted.

But then another situation comes up and we get mad at ourselves because we thought we had risen above this crap.

Learning how to rise above the crap is an ongoing journey, it's a never-ending highway to personal and spiritual development.

It's not so much the situation or event we find ourselves in that is important, it's how we perceive and deal with it - that is the important thing.

And even so, I can still comprehend their problems. One, for example, is extremely co-dependent. She lives her life in fear of anyone labeling her a "bad girl," and she'll go to great lengths to prove that she's "better" than someone who has fallen into disfavor. Never mind that her efforts to protect herself may perpetuate an injustice. She's a coward.

I can picture them all as damaged, primarily as cowards, because that's what they were. I can sort of forgive the cowardice. Sort of.

Meditation helps promote personal and spiritual development. In plain talk it helps us to step back and allow other people around us to be just who they are. ‘Coward’ is a label you have attached to that woman.

I remember things like how proud he was of his daughter that she gave away her mutt dog (which she had rescued) because he made her do that in order to "earn" a show dog. Did she need to "make space" in the home or the family finances for the show dog? No. Could she have kept both her beloved pet and the show dog? Of course. So why did he make her do that, given how incredibly painful it was for her and the rest of the family? Because he could. Because it proved her obedience to him. Everything that the man does is about making sure that he is obeyed, feared. He'd call that "respect."

My question here would be, "Why do you care?" It's stuff like that that you have to let go of. Certain events may have took place but you have made up a story about him in your head and that is what is hurting you and making you angry. It's time to wipe that tape clean and to realise that he's just a person with his own story.

So the only way that I can try to "forgive" or "accept" that part of the situation is to place some of the "blame" for it on myself. And my sense of self recoils from that. No matter which way I look at it, I can't say to myself, "I own part of this."

I'm coming from the belief that we create our own reality from our thoughts words and actions. I also come from the belief that we are responsible for everything that goes on around us. It has a lot to do with cause and effect. Not sure if that'll make much sense but I hope it does.

So the struggle to accept part of the blame is causing you unnecessary suffering.

There is no blame. It is what it is.

Be prepared to go beyond logic here. Those people around you are behaving just like you expect them to.

You could try an experiment. Make a conscious decision to try to see them in a much better light.

That's only a tiny, tiny step towards what you can do to change the situation and how you see these people. Once you begin to see them differently, your attitude towards them changes and the result should be that their attitude towards you changes.

Think along the lines of no right and no wrong - it is what it is. We all make choices, some work out and some don't - and life goes on.

You can also drop certain words from your vocabulary - though that might be difficult for a lawyer - but try dropping certain words like they were hot bricks causing you pain.

It doesn't help that every once in a while I run into these people. And their own guilt makes them feel the need to be friendly, which just sets me off. I've rebuffed them enough at this point that they stay away (now, four years later). But I still see them. We still drift past one another. I still have to pretend that they don't exist, because a casual conversation with them is unthinkable.

From where I'm coming from, I would also distance myself from certain people. I don't see anything wrong with that.

But it's not so much that we choose to distance ourselves from these people. What I found through meditation is that as we grow and develop certain types of people simply fade from our lives. In a way it's a kind of gauge to how well we are doing. As we grow and develop we draw like minded people to us.

And it's caustic. When I'm "triggered" by it, I seethe with anger. It oozes out of my pores. I stay angry and irritable for days.

I would like to purge myself of it. I just don't know how.

Some of that heightened awareness you have about those people might be served best by turning it on yourself - just for a bit. Be gentle with yourself. It's a painful road to travel.

In my heart of hearts, I know that I've forgiven less forgivable things, but I can't seem to forgive this one, no matter how much I try. This is clearly a weakness on my part.

A piece of it is that karma hasn't paid all of them back yet. One of them died, so he's off the hook. (See how nasty I am!!! ).

Nasty woman. :)

Seriously though, those are the type of thoughts you have to let go of. But then you already know that.

Hope you find some of that helpful. :)

Let me know how you get on checking out Byron Katie.

Rose

Sandy4957
07-26-12, 06:25 PM
Will do, Bluerose,

Thanks for the feedback. This stuff comes and goes for me. It's not like I dwell on it or try to dwell on it. I don't always know what will be a "trigger" for it. Sometimes it just appears, and I'm trying to figure out the pattern to the "triggers."

The problem seems to be that they're work-related. So I'll get all worked up whenever there's some sort of stress with work that taps into the insecurities that my former partners used against me. Then I'm off to the races for a while.

And yes, I know that I can decide that tomorrow is a new day, let go of the past, etc. But as I'm sure you know, PTSD sucks, in that it's sort of organic. It can grab you even when you don't want to be grabbed, even when you've firmly committed to not being grabbed, and (for me) panic attacks inevitably evolve into fury. :(

Heh heh. I suspect that it's a part of how I've survived. The fury saves me from turning inward. :o

Bluerose
07-26-12, 09:40 PM
Sandy,

At least your not a push over. And I suspect you have to be quite tough in your job.

It's the same for me, it comes and goes. There are days when I feel I've got it figured out and then there are days when I feel I'm back at the beginning.

I think we are each where we are supposed to be at this point in our lives. And there will always be room for improvement. Right? :)

PTSD really sucks. For me the flashbacks are few and far between these days but the occasional flooding of memories can still cause some down time. But for the most part, I'm doing great.

I hope this grey cloud of a situation at work lifts for you soon.

In the meantime, good luck with the meditation. :)

Rose

Sandy4957
07-26-12, 09:45 PM
Thanks, babe.

You know, the grey cloud has passed. (Although funny that you put it that way because grey days are a big problem for me. If we have a few in a row, I'm always transported back to April 2008 when I first left my former firm and I sat in my room, with the grey sky in the skylight overhead, and I had NO IDEA if or how I would make it... Every time.)

I am NOT VERY GOOD at this whole meditation, thing, I gotta say. But I'm still plugging away. I'm on the 11th day...

Funny thing is, though, I AM a pushover when it comes to protecting myself. That's the ridiculous thing. All this anger is there. Rarely do I express it. I channel it toward clients' interests, but I don't actually say what I want to say for myself very much. I figure that it'd be career suicide. I already have the "black mark." Can't afford another. :(

But I really appreciate your feedback, and I am reading the Byron Katie stuff. :)

Bluerose
07-27-12, 01:00 PM
You’re welcome.

I just thought of something. If you find it difficult to sit still for meditation then there’s always ‘walking meditation’. That’s where you go off by yourself to some lovely peaceful spot and simply wander till your hearts content, refusing to think of daily stuff, just put it all on hold for an hour and do a walking mediation.

Take care. :)

Rose

Sandy4957
07-27-12, 02:38 PM
Thanks, Blue. I do that often. :)