View Full Version : Difficulty waking up in the morning


FreeFalcon
01-09-12, 10:01 PM
Hello forum :D. Just a month ago I was put on Adderall 15mg XR and for a while, I had no problems. Lately though, It's been increasingly more and more difficult to wake up in the morning. Usually I take my adderall at 10am with a small breakfast. I drink plenty of water throughout the day, eat a normal lunch, dinner and I don't do any physical work that could exhaust me such as working out. Normally I go to bed around 1-2am because I feel that trying to get more sleep would help. I have no clue what to do. :confused: :confused:

fracturedstory
01-09-12, 11:24 PM
1am-2am doesn't seem like an early sleep schedule. Do you work and get home late? I got to bed around 10pm/11 and read a bit before I fall asleep. On a good night I'll fall asleep after an hour. On a usual night I'll fall asleep after 1am. On a bad night I'll be playing with legos at 3am.

I wake up around 6am/7am and usually get up 7:30/8am because of my cat insisting I feed her breakfast. I feel tired until after I eat breakfast then I seem to be doing a lot, usually has to do with chasing a cat around or changing her litter.

I take my medication at 10am too. If I haven't taken it after 10am I begin to notice that I haven't. I feel a bit unfocused and drained already.

FreeFalcon
01-10-12, 01:54 AM
1am-2am doesn't seem like an early sleep schedule. Do you work and get home late? I got to bed around 10pm/11 and read a bit before I fall asleep. On a good night I'll fall asleep after an hour. On a usual night I'll fall asleep after 1am. On a bad night I'll be playing with legos at 3am.

I wake up around 6am/7am and usually get up 7:30/8am because of my cat insisting I feed her breakfast. I feel tired until after I eat breakfast then I seem to be doing a lot, usually has to do with chasing a cat around or changing her litter.

I take my medication at 10am too. If I haven't taken it after 10am I begin to notice that I haven't. I feel a bit unfocused and drained already.

Well, no I don't work. Regardless of how much I sleep or how little I get though, I cannot find myself ignoring that snooze button :( I just don't feel any motivation to do anything I guess. I try to think of exciting things to look forward to for tomorrow but when I wake up, I feel like I could use an extra 30 minutes of sleep... or a few hours

sarahsweets
01-10-12, 05:55 AM
Have you ever had a sleep study?

Haakenlid
01-10-12, 08:46 AM
Some people put their pills and a glass of water by the bed and set an alarm for an hour before they want to get up. Than have a pill first thing in the morning, sleep an hour and get up when the medicine starts to kick in.

FreeFalcon
01-10-12, 11:36 AM
Have you ever had a sleep study?

A sleep study? Man, I heard those are really expensive and I'm in no financial position to get one :eek: The only sleep problem that runs on both sides of my family is sleep apnea (very rare) but this still doesn't seem to all work out considering I have been getting this problem a month after I started taking adderall. Other than that, I have no other side effects and I would say I'm in good health.

FreeFalcon
01-10-12, 11:44 AM
Some people put their pills and a glass of water by the bed and set an alarm for an hour before they want to get up. Than have a pill first thing in the morning, sleep an hour and get up when the medicine starts to kick in.

That sounds like it could work... feeling an adderall upon waking up seems like it would get anyone out of bed and going :D Thanks for the suggestion

CaptainCadet
01-10-12, 12:52 PM
Alternative solution, I think it may work.

http://i.imgur.com/HOpvr.png

manismom
01-10-12, 03:01 PM
Frickin' hilarious. Wish I could have a trampoline in MY bedroom.

I also take my meds and go back to sleep, then wake up "naturally" when the meds start to work.

Taking your Adderall at 10am may also be keeping you up later at night. If you can, you might try taking it earlier and see if you are sleepy earlier.

I also will hit the snooze button no matter how much sleep I have had if I don't have my meds in me. And even then I will still hit it a time or two. It's very difficult for ADDers to change mental states. So going from the sleep state to the awake state is problematic and a part of the ADD (or so I was told!)

known_guy
01-10-12, 03:21 PM
Frickin' hilarious. Wish I could have a trampoline in MY bedroom.

I also take my meds and go back to sleep, then wake up "naturally" when the meds start to work.

Taking your Adderall at 10am may also be keeping you up later at night. If you can, you might try taking it earlier and see if you are sleepy earlier.

I also will hit the snooze button no matter how much sleep I have had if I don't have my meds in me. And even then I will still hit it a time or two. It's very difficult for ADDers to change mental states. So going from the sleep state to the awake state is problematic and a part of the ADD (or so I was told!)

Yeah. Without medications waking up early in the morning is like impossible. I thought about the idea of taking my medications and going back to sleep but I've never been able to get myself to carry it out. D:

Ronsit
01-10-12, 03:36 PM
It's very difficult for ADDers to change mental states. So going from the sleep state to the awake state is problematic and a part of the ADD (or so I was told!)

Regardless of how much I sleep or how little I get though, I cannot find myself ignoring that snooze button

Same problem here :p When I don't wake up by myself but get woken up (by an alarm clock or another person) I'm in some sort of 'half-sleep-half-awake' state where I'm not fully concious, can't think properly and the only thing I can think about is that I want to go back to sleep. When I do get up, it then takes me an hour of being in a sleepy mood before I feel actually 'awake'.

fracturedstory
01-10-12, 06:26 PM
Second solution: get a cat.

I no longer use an alarm so I pretty much forgot about the snooze option. I think if you really want to do something you need to start doing it yourself. I used to literally roll out of bed in the morning because I could barely get my legs out to stand. The first couple of times forcing myself out of bed was hard, really hard, but when you get into the routine it gets easier. Although some days I just want to stay in a bit longer but I know if I allow it I may allow it the next day and the next. And just look at those hungry pleading eyes on my cat's face. Really, now that I have to be more responsible for her I'm becoming more responsible for myself.

You really need something like 6-8 hours sleep to get a good rest, so I suggest you go to bed before midnight. At least try that. I know what sleeping late does to my body in the morning and throughout the next day. It actually affects your appetite too.

You don't really have to listen to me but I've tried a many number of sleep schedules. I never feel completely awake in the morning expect for hyper days. I just know at a certain time in the morning I've got to get up to keep my daily routine intact. I know ADHDers hate routine but they actually help out a lot.

FreeFalcon
01-11-12, 10:38 AM
I have read all your guys's posts and there's a few details I'd like to point out. No, I did not try the trampoline idea lol :rolleyes: Instead, I changed my sleep schedule to waking up at 8am and going to bed at 12-1am. And also have been taking my med the very second I wake up. To say the least, no more groggy grumpy mornings! I think it was mostly my sleep schedule being a little different than usual... I used to wake up at 7am and go to bed at 11pm when I had school not too long ago. I'm going to try and continue this for a couple days to see the full results. I appreciate all the help of this forum :cool:

SilverBro
01-18-12, 02:26 AM
I've seen those alarm clocks that jump off the table and "hide". So you need to get out of bed in order to find it and turn it off. Maybe that will work?

Morris86
03-07-12, 12:26 AM
I have had 2 over night sleep studies. I am diagnosed with Obstructive Sleep Apnea Disorder. I also have ADD and Bi-Polar Disorder, and depression. Unfortunatley, It runs in the family through my dads' side. Throughout the last 7 years, I have been employed with numerous employers. My resume was so terrible. Fortunately now, I have been employed for nearly 3 years with treatment for my ADD/Bi-Polar.

I have to sleep with a machine at night to give me sufficient air through the night. If I don't have it, I usually gasp for air several times per night. Luckily I haven't passed away from not having the treatment. Now, I have a difficult time waking up almost all the time. I feel like I can sleep for so many hours;sometimes I do. I feel that i've lost so much out of life.

My job on the other hand, is on a loose string. I have had so many incidents where I woke up too late, or woke up early enough, fell back as sleep, and woke up an hour late for work. I feel sad when I wake up, and feel like it doesnt matter if I go in or not. When I do go in from being late, I feel like everyone hates me and starres. Recently, I requested accomadations,etc. I've been told by my HR department that I'm protected by federal law for specified unpaid days off.

I'm trying to find a new jobs like a franchisee or related with flexible scheduling. I havent had much feedback fro my psychiatrist when I explain how I feel about work. He said "sounds like work; we dont want to go, yet we have to". I have a family and an apartment. Everything feels like its falling apart in front of me and im caged in.

Hypoactive
03-07-12, 01:12 AM
every single person i've ever come in contact with (and i'm gettin' old, so that's a lotta people) that's had a sleep study done was told that they have slight to moderate sleep apnea, and a CPAP machine was "highly recommended" (translation: we make $$$ when you buy CPAP machine)...and every single person bought the CPAP machine and gave up on it within weeks...

the fact is, everyone has a "bit" of sleep apnea...and it's most often caused by obesity, alcohol consumption, smoking, sleeping on one's back, and/or medications that depress the central nervous system...eliminate all those, and you virtually eliminate any chance of sleep apnea...unless you have a sleep study done. ;)

FreeFalcon
03-07-12, 02:04 AM
I have had 2 over night sleep studies. I am diagnosed with Obstructive Sleep Apnea Disorder. I also have ADD and Bi-Polar Disorder, and depression. Unfortunatley, It runs in the family through my dads' side. Throughout the last 7 years, I have been employed with numerous employers. My resume was so terrible. Fortunately now, I have been employed for nearly 3 years with treatment for my ADD/Bi-Polar.

I have to sleep with a machine at night to give me sufficient air through the night. If I don't have it, I usually gasp for air several times per night. Luckily I haven't passed away from not having the treatment. Now, I have a difficult time waking up almost all the time. I feel like I can sleep for so many hours;sometimes I do. I feel that i've lost so much out of life.

My job on the other hand, is on a loose string. I have had so many incidents where I woke up too late, or woke up early enough, fell back as sleep, and woke up an hour late for work. I feel sad when I wake up, and feel like it doesnt matter if I go in or not. When I do go in from being late, I feel like everyone hates me and starres. Recently, I requested accomadations,etc. I've been told by my HR department that I'm protected by federal law for specified unpaid days off.

I'm trying to find a new jobs like a franchisee or related with flexible scheduling. I havent had much feedback fro my psychiatrist when I explain how I feel about work. He said "sounds like work; we dont want to go, yet we have to". I have a family and an apartment. Everything feels like its falling apart in front of me and im caged in.

I'm sorry to hear all the trouble you've went through. I feel like I'm just a lazy piece of crap looking back at my original topic. At least 1 of my relatives on both sides of my family have a sleep machine. I guess sleep apnea runs in the family? Im not too edumacated on sleep apnea and disorders but I have been contemplating whether I do have a sleeping problem or not. I used to wake up in cold sweats in the middle of the night and sometimes I'll get this constant feeling that I'm falling when I close my eyes in bed. None really seem to connect with apnea though. Also, a doctor can put you on less hours if he feels that it is right for your own health. I hope the best for you.

purpleToes
03-07-12, 05:25 AM
I'm sorry to hear all the trouble you've went through. I feel like I'm just a lazy piece of crap looking back at my original topic. At least 1 of my relatives on both sides of my family have a sleep machine. I guess sleep apnea runs in the family? Im not too edumacated on sleep apnea and disorders but I have been contemplating whether I do have a sleeping problem or not. I used to wake up in cold sweats in the middle of the night and sometimes I'll get this constant feeling that I'm falling when I close my eyes in bed. None really seem to connect with apnea though. Also, a doctor can put you on less hours if he feels that it is right for your own health. I hope the best for you.

Night sweats certainly can be caused by sleep apnea. As can waking unrefreshed, having poor stamina for activities, memory and concentration issues (assuming you have?), and depression and anxiety. Obstructive sleep apnea can run in families due to the inherited anatomical features. Sleep apnea is thought to be a cause of ADHD or ADHD-like symptoms in children.

purpleToes
03-07-12, 07:16 AM
every single person i've ever come in contact with (and i'm gettin' old, so that's a lotta people) that's had a sleep study done was told that they have slight to moderate sleep apnea, and a CPAP machine was "highly recommended" (translation: we make $$$ when you buy CPAP machine)...and every single person bought the CPAP machine and gave up on it within weeks...

the fact is, everyone has a "bit" of sleep apnea...and it's most often caused by obesity, alcohol consumption, smoking, sleeping on one's back, and/or medications that depress the central nervous system...eliminate all those, and you virtually eliminate any chance of sleep apnea...unless you have a sleep study done. ;)

Respectfully, I must disagree with Hypoactive on just about every point.

To begin, it's not surprising that the majority of people who go for a sleep breathing study are found to have sleep breathing problems, as those are people who have symptoms and suspect a problem. People without sleep apnea wouldn't have the symptoms and wouldn't be going in for a sleep study. Personally I wouldn't like to get my sleep study done at a place that also sells CPAP equipment, just as I don't get my car smog-tested at a repair shop, but that doesn't mean sleep diagnostic labs are inherently dishonest.

If sleep apnea is found, of course CPAP is recommended. Again, presumably the patient would not be there if they didn't have symptoms. CPAP is the gold standard first-line treatment for obstructive sleep apnea. Should they not recommend treatment?

It's true that CPAP is notoriously difficult to adjust to, and has a high dropout rate, but success has much to do with how much support and information the user has access to. There are excellent support forums, like Cpaptalk.com and Apneasupport.com, where CPAP users share tips and solutions for using CPAP successfully. Not everyone is successful (I was unsuccessful), but those who are successful enjoy better health and a better quality of life than if they continue untreated. My sleep partner was able to use CPAP comfortable from the first night (lucky *******) and he never sleeps without it or else he feels like crap. Alternatives to CPAP are surgeries and jaw positioning devices worn during sleep.

The "bit" of sleep apnea that "everybody" has is defined by the AASM as fewer than 5 apneas per hour. Anything above that is not normal and is associated with symptoms and increased health risks. OSA tends toprogres with age, and is more prevalent with age, so that may be why Hypoactive, being an older person, has a lot of friends who have been diagnosed. My OSA was categorized as mild-moderate but my symptoms became severe enough that I could not longer work at a job I loved doing. After surgical treatment, all of my symptoms improved dramatically, so I have personally experienced the correlation. (Unfortunately, the surgery in my case was not successful long-term and I am back to struggling with symptoms and CPAP again.)

While obsesity, drinking alcohol, sleeping on back, etc, are all risk factors for sleep apnea, they are not the only causes. Many people with OSA are not overweight. However, untreated sleep apnea can worsen obesity. Many obese CPAP users say that after treatment, they had more energy and it was easier to lose weight. Anatomy is an important, maybe the most important, factor, such as small or narrow jaws.

Lastly, many doctors are still not aware that there is a subtler form of sleep disordered breathing, called Upper Airway Resistance Syndrome (UARS), where there are not many apneas or hypopneas, but instead mostly flow limitations where the oxygen saturation does not fall, but the respiratory effort causes an arousal (wakes the sleeper into a lighter sleep stage). If there are many of these respiratory effort related arousals (RERAs), the person can actually be suffering a form of sleep deprivation and the symptoms can be every bit as debilitating as OSA.

Standard sleep studies may not detect UARS if they don't have the correct equipment to reliably detect flow limitations. I travel 300 miles for my sleep studies to the only lab I know of that has this equipment, called Esophageal Pressure Manometry, or "Pes." Before having a sleep study with Pes, my OSA was categorized as mild, and I was told it was likely not the cause of my symptoms. I wasted years searching for other causes for my fatigue and memory and concentration problems. Eventually after retesting with Pes and discovering I had many RERAs, my OSA was upgraded to mild-moderate, and my symptoms made more sense in that context.

It would would be unfortunate for anyone suffering from sleep disordered breathing to be discouraged from getting tested or pursuing this potentially life-changing treatment.

Brob2
03-07-12, 09:03 PM
every single person i've ever come in contact with (and i'm gettin' old, so that's a lotta people) that's had a sleep study done was told that they have slight to moderate sleep apnea, and a CPAP machine was "highly recommended" (translation: we make $$$ when you buy CPAP machine)...and every single person bought the CPAP machine and gave up on it within weeks...

the fact is, everyone has a "bit" of sleep apnea...and it's most often caused by obesity, alcohol consumption, smoking, sleeping on one's back, and/or medications that depress the central nervous system...eliminate all those, and you virtually eliminate any chance of sleep apnea...unless you have a sleep study done. ;)

Respectfully, I must disagree with Hypoactive on just about every point.

To begin, it's not surprising that the majority of people who go for a sleep breathing study are found to have sleep breathing problems, as those are people who have symptoms and suspect a problem. People without sleep apnea wouldn't have the symptoms and wouldn't be going in for a sleep study. Personally I wouldn't like to get my sleep study done at a place that also sells CPAP equipment, just as I don't get my car smog-tested at a repair shop, but that doesn't mean sleep diagnostic labs are inherently dishonest.

If sleep apnea is found, of course CPAP is recommended. Again, presumably the patient would not be there if they didn't have symptoms. CPAP is the gold standard first-line treatment for obstructive sleep apnea. Should they not recommend treatment?

It's true that CPAP is notoriously difficult to adjust to, and has a high dropout rate, but success has much to do with how much support and information the user has access to. There are excellent support forums, like Cpaptalk.com and Apneasupport.com, where CPAP users share tips and solutions for using CPAP successfully. Not everyone is successful (I was unsuccessful), but those who are successful enjoy better health and a better quality of life than if they continue untreated. My sleep partner was able to use CPAP comfortable from the first night (lucky *******) and he never sleeps without it or else he feels like crap. Alternatives to CPAP are surgeries and jaw positioning devices worn during sleep.

The "bit" of sleep apnea that "everybody" has is defined by the AASM as fewer than 5 apneas per hour. Anything above that is not normal and is associated with symptoms and increased health risks. OSA tends toprogres with age, and is more prevalent with age, so that may be why Hypoactive, being an older person, has a lot of friends who have been diagnosed. My OSA was categorized as mild-moderate but my symptoms became severe enough that I could not longer work at a job I loved doing. After surgical treatment, all of my symptoms improved dramatically, so I have personally experienced the correlation. (Unfortunately, the surgery in my case was not successful long-term and I am back to struggling with symptoms and CPAP again.)

While obsesity, drinking alcohol, sleeping on back, etc, are all risk factors for sleep apnea, they are not the only causes. Many people with OSA are not overweight. However, untreated sleep apnea can worsen obesity. Many obese CPAP users say that after treatment, they had more energy and it was easier to lose weight. Anatomy is an important, maybe the most important, factor, such as small or narrow jaws.

Lastly, many doctors are still not aware that there is a subtler form of sleep disordered breathing, called Upper Airway Resistance Syndrome (UARS), where there are not many apneas or hypopneas, but instead mostly flow limitations where the oxygen saturation does not fall, but the respiratory effort causes an arousal (wakes the sleeper into a lighter sleep stage). If there are many of these respiratory effort related arousals (RERAs), the person can actually be suffering a form of sleep deprivation and the symptoms can be every bit as debilitating as OSA.

Standard sleep studies may not detect UARS if they don't have the correct equipment to reliably detect flow limitations. I travel 300 miles for my sleep studies to the only lab I know of that has this equipment, called Esophageal Pressure Manometry, or "Pes." Before having a sleep study with Pes, my OSA was categorized as mild, and I was told it was likely not the cause of my symptoms. I wasted years searching for other causes for my fatigue and memory and concentration problems. Eventually after retesting with Pes and discovering I had many RERAs, my OSA was upgraded to mild-moderate, and my symptoms made more sense in that context.

It would would be unfortunate for anyone suffering from sleep disordered breathing to be discouraged from getting tested or pursuing this potentially life-changing treatment.

I have to say I agree with Hypoactive- my experience with 'sleep apnea' and discussion with others lead to a similar conclusion. I do believe many people are sent to sleep clinics prematurely when other fixes are as good or better. In my case, I had a difficult time adjusting to the CPAP though it clearly helped me breathe better while prone. I then bought some of those Breathe Right strips for triathlons which really helped open my nostrils, and decided to try them for sleeping. 'Sleep Apnea' fixed. Hmm. I'm sleeping better, ex was sleeping better, and the sleep Doc and CPAP maker we're all better off. Just screwed the taxpayers, that's all:umm1:. I don't think sleep apnea is nearly as common as sleep Docs (and some other Docs) might believe.