View Full Version : Wake Therapy (Sleep Deprivation) for instant relief of ADHD & Depression-Anyone?


ryan4745
02-10-12, 01:05 PM
From My Post here: http://www.addforums.com/forums/showthread.php?t=117934

Anyone tried "wake therapy" (Sleep Deprivation) or related techniques for Depression, SAD, ADHD? What are your experiences? I would be interested in connecting with anyone who has ever tried it, formally or not.

Here is a free excerpt from the book that describes the full protocol of Wake Therapy + Light Therapy + Sleep Phase Advance, which is what i'm attempting recently : http://content.karger.com/ProdukteDB...Chrono_004.pdf


http://www.addforums.com/forums/showthread.php?t=117934

pitchw
02-12-12, 06:22 PM
I've never tried it but I've long felt that barely sleeping the night before helps some (though not all) aspects of my ADD.

I used to regularly get insomnia, including middle of the night insomnia where I would wake up at around 1am (so close to the same time as for wake therapy). If I stay up for the rest of the day, I do notice I'm significantly calmer and relaxed during the next afternoon (It always hits after 2pm-4pm or so, I get no benefit before then). I'm predominately inattentive, but I still get somewhat hyperactive, fidgety and anxious. These symptoms are significantly dumbed down. However, I notice that I'm actually more talkative though.

However, because I'm so tired, I never feel like doing anything. And being constantly sleepy is quite painful. My ADD isn't that bad, so I've never felt like this is a valid treatment for me. But in any case, thanks for the read, now I know I'm not the only wierdo who feels more normal when I'm tired haha.

xllr8er
03-08-12, 03:46 AM
I used to love staying up then getting low hours of sleep. I'd be so relaxed(mind not racing or feeling fidgety) the next day. Unfortunately, the late afternoon crash is, well a crash :(.
I used to think it was imaginary, but I remember reading an article mentioning an increase in frontal lobe dopamine following sleep deprivation. Sorry don't have the link handy.

Abi
03-08-12, 06:31 AM
This used to help me too during my college years but is extremely unhealthy in the long run. It is NOT a long term treatment solution and I strongly ad vise against it. People need to get an adequate amount of sleep - AT LEAST 7 hours per day, and this is all the more important for psych patients.

speculative
04-24-12, 09:39 AM
Before I was diagnosed (with anxiety and adhd) in college I would stay up all night the night before a paper was due writing it. We all know that this is a common method (waiting until the last minute) to build up enough concentration and focus and motivation to get something done. However, I noticed these side-effects: happier, more upbeat, more outgoing and sociable (when I am around people, not more need to "go out" and be around people though), less worry, more easy-going, no ruminating, more relaxed, etc. I was tired, but generally ok until that night when I would feel the weariness hit and really need sleep.

I have found this effect when I am just at the start of getting sick also, when my body and mind have less energy because the energy is going towards fighting off the cold germs.

I'm not sure if this is the same thing that you are talking about, but I found this thread interesting...

madadder
05-17-12, 09:44 AM
whenever i stayed up all night i noticed that i was better in social situations the next day. I didn't believe it though, because it didnt make sense to me. Now it does :)

oneup
05-19-12, 03:53 AM
It can be really great, when in college I would chain smoke, drink coffee, stay up till 5am, usually twice a week and get stuff done, get up at 7am, go to class, fall asleep in class, go to the library, fall asleep, and do that 2-3 times a week to take care of school work. Do I remember any of it? Nah, course not, I was only cramming, but I graduated at least.

Or go out, drink till 2am, get drunk munchies, get a couple hours of sleep, then off to work, super focused from having a fun night to pass out as soon as I got home.

But I don't do this anymore, don't smoke, not a student, hardly ever drink. Now I'm "responsible" (boring), but healthier at least, in some ways anyways