View Full Version : Phychiatrist says I may have aspergers disorder as well. WTH?? as ADHD


plank80
02-10-12, 01:45 PM
In his letter to my GP he says I volunteered information consistent with ASD as well as ADHD. He says his was the fact that I have changed jobs/been sacked many times and many short-term girlfriends. Aparently this shows I don't see the impact of my behaviour on other people:confused:. I do see the impact I just can't help it. He should have seen from talking to me alone I'm nothing like an aspie and my brains nothing like a computer, I wish it was.

Does this sound strange that he would think this?

Lunacie
02-10-12, 02:28 PM
In his letter to my GP he says I volunteered information consistent with ASD as well as ADHD. He says his was the fact that I have changed jobs/been sacked many times and many short-term girlfriends. Aparently this shows I don't see the impact of my behaviour on other people:confused:. I do see the impact I just can't help it. He should have seen from talking to me alone I'm nothing like an aspie and my brains nothing like a computer, I wish it was.

Does this sound strange that he would think this?

Difficulty keeping jobs is also very common with ADHD. Social relationships
may be even harder for an Aspie, but they are difficult for many with
ADHD as well. If those are the only things he's basing a dx of Asperger's
on, I'd say he's not a good diagnostician for Autism Spectrum Disorders.
Not all Aspie's have a brain like a computer though, so maybe both of you
need to do some research.

plank80
02-10-12, 02:52 PM
Yeah not too sure myself what aspergers is, I'll have to some research. He isn't a specialist in autism spectrum disorders so can't diagnose it.

Thought it was funny basing a conclusion on that small bit of information that could apply to a lot of people I know.

Maybe it was because I told him my brother used to slag me off by calling me autistic when I was daydreaming, but no one had heard of attention deficit disorder back then.

Anyone on here have aspergers and ADHD? Can one mask the other?

known_guy
02-10-12, 03:29 PM
I'm surprised he reached that conclusion given the information you gave him...

Ha ha! Once someone asked if I liken myself to a robot/computer. I was like WTF?

Lunacie
02-10-12, 03:30 PM
Yeah not too sure myself what aspergers is, I'll have to some research. He isn't a specialist in autism spectrum disorders so can't diagnose it.

Thought it was funny basing a conclusion on that small bit of information that could apply to a lot of people I know.

Maybe it was because I told him my brother used to slag me off by calling me autistic when I was daydreaming, but no one had heard of attention deficit disorder back then.

Anyone on here have aspergers and ADHD? Can one mask the other?

Yes, some people have been diagnosed with both ADHD and Asperger's.
They share some traits in common which can make it difficult to diagnose.

plank80
02-10-12, 03:46 PM
Took a test, answered it trutfully, scored 8, the average for People without the disorder is 16, people with aspergers score 32 at least. Read a bit about it and def do not have it, not even close.

I'll be bringing this up at my next appointment, I'm not happy about this, why he would even put that in his report? Because i 've changed jobs a few times? WTF!! I'm confused enuff about my ADHD without extra s*** on top of that.

Hypoactive
02-10-12, 04:20 PM
if he's a psychiatrist, he is supposed to be an expert in autism spectrum disorders, and he absolutely can legally diagnose it...but from what you've written, it sounds like he hasn't a clue, and that is scary.

if i were you, i'd get an in-depth evaluation from a neuro-psychologist, and when the results inevitably come back indicating that you don't have asperger's, i'd switch psychiatrists *immediately*...

because if you keep him as your psychiatrist, there is the potential for his ego to take over -- refusing to change his diagnosis regardless of how many doctors say otherwise, and therefore, your "asperger's" will be listed on all future medical documents -- and that can have a significant negative impact on many aspects in life.

(btw, this is the exact scenario i encountered years ago when having my son evaluated initially...it wasn't until we switched psychiatrists officially that his dx could legally be changed)

plank80
02-10-12, 04:52 PM
That's what Im worried about, it going on my records. I'll be saying to him on my next visit.

Lillianmay
02-10-12, 08:11 PM
I read an article last week that the DSM is going to tighten up the requirements to be diagnosed with autism. I know many people are upset about this because the term Asperger's won't be used anymore, but I think that too many people with a broad number of symptoms of varying degrees are getting labeled with autism who really are not. This makes it hard to treat or for people even to know what autism is. The article said that a new category called "social communication disorder" was a possibility for people who had social communication problems, but did not have the rigidity (profound rigidity) and need for "sameness" that many autistic people have. Some of the same genes seem to be involved in autism and ADHD, but it seems to me that as difficult as ADHD is to live with, autism is even harder and the symptoms that both share are more profound in autism. Maybe the change will help keep what happened to Plank80 from happening.

plank80
02-10-12, 08:48 PM
Thats just it I don't have a social communication problem, I crave socialization and make friends easy, I don't plan anything, don't have repetitive behaviours, never remember dates or times in fact I hate numbers, don't collect things or details of things, don't have monotone speech, just the opposite and express my emotions too much sometimes. How did he think I may have an autism spectrum disorder?

I can see some similarities between ADHD and autism, but surely a specialist should know the difference. My parents couldn't believe he thought I may have aspergers when I said to them and they aren't experts.

fracturedstory
02-10-12, 09:58 PM
Hey, I don't have a brain like a compute-- oh wait.
Craig Nicholls doesn't have a brain like a computer. He has AS, is a musician and very good artist (painter). There are some with autism that are more artist than the technical thinking type.

Hmm, so you are in denial that you have AS, do a self-test and get a low score - well obviously you would. You can't answer it objectively.

I have autism and ADHD but my autistic symptoms are pretty damn noticeable. Sometimes ADHD and AS symptoms can overlap.

Also, stop stereotyping us. I'm poor at math, don't have monotone speech and have difficulty controlling my emotions. Most times I appear to have no emotions is when I'm overloaded by the environment and people.

Yeah, I can't wait for the DSM 5 to change too. Thank God for my rigid behaviours.

Also, maybe your psychiatrist thinks you have both.

Fortune
02-10-12, 10:01 PM
Took a test, answered it trutfully, scored 8, the average for People without the disorder is 16, people with aspergers score 32 at least. Read a bit about it and def do not have it, not even close.

I'll be bringing this up at my next appointment, I'm not happy about this, why he would even put that in his report? Because i 've changed jobs a few times? WTF!! I'm confused enuff about my ADHD without extra s*** on top of that.

People on the autistic spectrum tend to score 26 or higher, but the reasons for screening people depend on whether they requested it vs. whether it was administered for another reason.

Asperger's doesn't mean you'll be completely unaware of the effect on other people, but odds are if you have it, you'd need to be told about your effect on other people to "get it."

Also, something like 65-75% of people on the autistic spectrum also meet the criteria for ADHD. I believe that this, not "similarities" between the two conditions, is a major reason for perceived overlap.

Your list of objections has some fairly strange data points. Autistic people don't "think like computers" (at least, I've never noticed such a tendency in myself), and being obsessed with dates or numbers is not required for a diagnosis. Neither is monotone speech or being unemotional.

I can't say whether you're autistic or not. As for your psychiatrist, he should explain how you meet the criteria in terms of social impairment, communication, and repetitive behavior. A lot of conditions can result in having many short relationships, so that by itself would not be evidence for Asperger's. The same with losing jobs many times.

Fraser_0762
02-10-12, 10:03 PM
Yeah there seems to be a lot of stereo typing about AS.

Whenever i've told somebody I have AS, they give me a funny look and wonder why i'm not more of a geek... :eyebrow:

fracturedstory
02-10-12, 10:10 PM
Yeah there seems to be a lot of stereo typing about AS.

Whenever i've told somebody I have AS, they give me a funny look and wonder why i'm not more of a geek... :eyebrow:
At least they haven't asked you to count matchsticks.

Fortune
02-10-12, 10:12 PM
I should keep a list of the things I've been told that are supposed to "disqualify me" from being autistic - all of them by people who know me online. Offline, no one seems surprised.

Fraser_0762
02-10-12, 10:16 PM
At least they haven't asked you to count matchsticks.

Nope, but I have been made to play 52 card pick up and count the cards to make sure they're all there. :(

plank80
02-10-12, 10:23 PM
Hey, I don't have a brain like a compute-- oh wait.
Craig Nicholls doesn't have a brain like a computer. He has AS, is a musician and very good artist (painter). There are some with autism that are more artist than the technical thinking type.

Hmm, so you are in denial that you have AS, do a self-test and get a low score - well obviously you would. You can't answer it objectively.

I have autism and ADHD but my autistic symptoms are pretty damn noticeable. Sometimes ADHD and AS symptoms can overlap.

Also, stop stereotyping us. I'm poor at math, don't have monotone speech and have difficulty controlling my emotions. Most times I appear to have no emotions is when I'm overloaded by the environment and people.

Yeah, I can't wait for the DSM 5 to change too. Thank God for my rigid behaviours.

Also, maybe your psychiatrist thinks you have both.

Sorry didn't mean any offence and I really don't think I have AS. Even if I did getting a diagnosis in this country would take more time and effort than it would be worth, I am just wondering why he would even report that with no evidence of it especially as he can't diagnose it.

If I thought there was anything to suggest AS it would not annoy me, but theres not. He may as well said he thinks I might have herpes, it is irrelevant to the diagnosis of ADHD.

As for answering a test objectively, how else would you answer it? I wouldn't even have known what way to answer it to skew the results.

plank80
02-10-12, 10:25 PM
Also don't get sensory overload

known_guy
02-10-12, 10:26 PM
Nope, but I have been made to play 52 card pick up and count the cards to make sure they're all there. :(

OMFG, that exact thing happened to me once. I was completely oblivious. ><

Fortune
02-10-12, 10:26 PM
As for answering a test objectively, how else would you answer it? I wouldn't even have known what way to answer it to skew the results.

You can't answer the test objectively, you can only answer it to the best of your subjective awareness and perceptions. It's not a math test where you can add a series of numbers together and come to an objective conclusion.

Fraser_0762
02-10-12, 10:27 PM
OMFG, that exact thing happened to me once. I was completely oblivious. ><

Yeah... I think I should just count my brain cells next time, i'd probably get the job done a lot quicker. :D

CheekyMonkey
02-10-12, 10:34 PM
I would get a second opinion by someone that is actually familiar with ASD. From what you say, it doesn't sound very Aspie, but you never know.

Anna B
02-10-12, 10:38 PM
Way back in the 80's I was diagnosed as manic because I had trouble sleeping, would compulsively clean, never sat still always had to be busy and worried over everything. Now I know I am ADHD, I was not, bi polar but OCD with ADHD. And only filled the prescription once.
The same Dr diagnosed my oldest as Autistic, Switched to Neurologist and that was changed to ADHD. Later adding other diagnosis of Tourettes.
Now getting anyone willing to discuss ADHD here is impossible, require mental health assessment, check lists and on and on . Referrals and incessant paperwork.
Sometimes it looks like every specialist has to make a $ quota before following through.
I feel like yelling " has everybody got their share of the pot, can we help the child now".

[Even if I did getting a diagnosis in this country would take more time and effort than it would be worth, I am just wondering why he would even report that with no evidence of it especially as he can't diagnose it. quote]
:mad:

plank80
02-10-12, 10:56 PM
I would get a second opinion by someone that is actually familiar with ASD. From what you say, it doesn't sound very Aspie, but you never know.

Mate it's hard enuf getting an adult ADHD assessment in the UK. If I went to my GP and tried to tell him how AS affects my life I couldn't because I don't have the symptoms. The PCT wouldn't fund an assessment because I don't show signs of the disorder. His whole reasoning was that I have had many short term relationships(i get bored quickly) and several jobs(motivation problem). Half my mates must have aspergers then!

If you met me you would see I'm in no way autistic, how a psychiatrist would think I am is beyond me.

CheekyMonkey
02-10-12, 10:58 PM
Mate it's hard enuf getting an adult ADHD assessment in the UK. If I went to my GP and tried to tell him how AS affects my life I couldn't because I don't have the symptoms. The PCT wouldn't fund an assessment because I don't show signs of the disorder. His whole reasoning was that I have had many short term relationships(i get bored quickly) and several jobs(motivation problem). Half my mates must have aspergers then!

If you met me you would see I'm in no way autistic, how a psychiatrist would think I am is beyond me.

I hear ya. I guess just go with your gut feelings then, eh?

Fortune
02-10-12, 11:15 PM
Can you get a different psychiatrist who's not trying to foist a pet theory on you?

plank80
02-10-12, 11:54 PM
Don't know, I think he might have got confused on what I said or something.

Now I remember him asking me if I knew why people fell out with me and I said I don't know, but he just caught me in the middle of speaking and my mind went blank. I know I can be offensive because I say what I think and it annoys me when I've ****** someone off from opening my mouth too quick but the words to tell him this wouldn't come and I didn't think it would matter.

Maybe it's my fault but then maybe an expert should see past this as well.

Fraser_0762
02-10-12, 11:57 PM
I don't feel very "Aspie like" either. But according to other people, its pretty obvious.

Perhaps get opinions from other people who are quite knowledgeable of the syndrome and see what they have to say about it.

Like I say, I don't "feel" like I have Aspergers Syndrome.

coconut
02-11-12, 01:28 AM
Same here. I was diagnosed with aspergers because I have a hard time with organisation, I'm easily bored, have trouble with fine motor skills, suffer from low self esteem and depression.

I was diagnosed with adhd beforehand but this psychologist said that label was wrong and I was aspergers instead.

6 years later a psychiatrist says he couldnt understand how anyone could put the AS label on me and prescribed me Ritalin and for the first time in my life I felt normal. So if I have AS can Ritalin work? or does it only work if you have adhd?

Fraser_0762
02-11-12, 01:50 AM
I believe stimulant use should be considered for AS also. They don't even consider it for "Dypraxia" even although that effects concentration, organisation, motivation... and so on.

I remember the first time I took speed and for once in my life, I had one of those "ooooh, so this is how things are supposed to be" moments.

Fortune
02-11-12, 01:58 AM
Like I say, I don't "feel" like I have Aspergers Syndrome.

Well, that's kind of an odd concept anyway. What would "Feel like I have Asperger's Syndrome" feel like? To me it feels normal, so it doesn't seem remarkable. How am I going to compare that to other people, though? I don't know what it's like to be someone else with different perceptions, you know? The way I identify differences is finding a way to compare and contrast with other people - both on the autistic spectrum and off of it.

I know there are several things I do that are considered hallmarks of autistic behavior, but these don't feel weird or strange to me, they feel normal.

Fraser_0762
02-11-12, 02:03 AM
Well, that's kind of an odd concept anyway. What would "Feel like I have Asperger's Syndrome" feel like? To me it feels normal, so it doesn't seem remarkable. How am I going to compare that to other people, though? I don't know what it's like to be someone else with different perceptions, you know? The way I identify differences is finding a way to compare and contrast with other people - both on the autistic spectrum and off of it.

I know there are several things I do that are considered hallmarks of autistic behavior, but these don't feel weird or strange to me, they feel normal.

Well thats pretty much my point. Theres nothing to compare the feeling to, as its the only feeling we know throughout our lives.

Thats why i've suggested to the OP to get other opinions. Just because he doesn't think he has AS, don't mean that he doesn't. It could be simply that its the "norm" for him, like it is for the rest of us.

plank80
02-11-12, 07:01 AM
Na, I've asked couple of mates and I'm def not autistic-like. If I was I would've been told before now, where I'm from anybody different gets a hard time and never gets accepted, I would know before this if was different

Fraser_0762
02-11-12, 08:50 AM
Na, I've asked couple of mates and I'm def not autistic-like. If I was I would've been told before now, where I'm from anybody different gets a hard time and never gets accepted, I would know before this if was different

I'm sorry, but a "couple of mates" aren't going to know any better.

None of my old mates knew I had AS, because I never told them. And even if I had done, they still wouldn't have had a clue what it was or what signs to look out for.

Anyway, theres no such thing as being "Autistic-like". You could meet two people with autism who appear to be exact opposites on the surface.

plank80
02-11-12, 09:21 AM
I'm sorry, but a "couple of mates" aren't going to know any better.

None of my old mates knew I had AS, because I never told them. And even if I had done, they still wouldn't have had a clue what it was or what signs to look out for.

Anyway, theres no such thing as being "Autistic-like". You could meet two people with autism who appear to be exact opposites on the surface.

I have read a good bit about the disorder and do not fit most of it. I can see a couple of overlaps with ADHD but that is it, all my interests are mainstream and most are group acticities, I don't have a problem having conversations or reading body language, I have a lot of friends and was always very sociable, I hate doing things alone, there is many reasons why I know I don't have ASD. As well, no one at all in my whole family is autistic, some are bipoler, ADHD, depression

I would not care if I had it, but I don't relate to it at all, not like the first time I read about ADHD. I'm just not a rigid, logical thinker at all, wish I was, maybe life would be less random and chaotic. I don't do repetitive behaviours either. Nothing in my life is consistent, I have a million interests not just two or three. I could go on and on..

Fraser_0762
02-11-12, 09:27 AM
I have read a good bit about the disorder and do not fit most of it. I can see a couple of overlaps with ADHD but that is it, all my interests are mainstream and most are group acticities, I don't have a problem having conversations or reading body language, I have a lot of friends and was always very sociable, I hate doing things alone, there is many reasons why I know I don't have ASD. As well, no one at all in my whole family is autistic, some are bipoler, ADHD, depression

I would not care if I had it, but I don't relate to it at all, not like the first time I read about ADHD. I'm just not a rigid, logical thinker at all, wish I was, maybe life would be less random and chaotic. I don't do repetitive behaviours either. Nothing in my life is consistent, I have a million interests not just two or three. I could go on and on..

You've just pretty much described me there as well. I don't think of myself as a "rigid, logical thinker" either. Logical thinkers are productive, i'm anything but productive.

I'm not trying to push AS on you because perhaps you really don't have it. But i'm just trying to say that most of the things you read about AS from websites or what you hear from people is usually very stereo-typed.

plank80
02-11-12, 10:07 AM
I understand what you're saying, Fraser, but a psychiatrist that knows about autism would wonder why I was seeing him if I went in trying to tell him I think I have aspergers. I always second guess myself and i'm still wondering do I have it, but I've done some not so legal dealings in my life that I never mentioned to the psych as I'm not proud of it and I wouldn't have lasted two seconds if I could not read peoples intentions. I'm quick at reading people, I'm certain of that.

plank80
02-11-12, 10:12 AM
I understand what you're saying, Fraser, but a psychiatrist that knows about autism would wonder why I was seeing him if I went in trying to tell him I think I have aspergers. I always second guess myself and i'm still wondering do I have it, but I've done some not so legal dealings in my life that I never mentioned to the psych as I'm not proud of it and I wouldn't have lasted two seconds if I could not read peoples intentions. I'm quick at reading people, I'm certain of that.

Lunacie
02-11-12, 10:19 AM
I'm sorry, but a "couple of mates" aren't going to know any better.

None of my old mates knew I had AS, because I never told them. And even if I had done, they still wouldn't have had a clue what it was or what signs to look out for.

Anyway, theres no such thing as being "Autistic-like". You could meet two people with autism who appear to be exact opposites on the surface.

One Autism specialist we've had dealings with is very fond of saying "If
you've met a person with Autism - you've met ONE person with Autism."

It's a very broad spectrum disorder and the way each person combines
various traits or symptoms and the severity of each can be remarkable
different. Even the primary trait of not talking until the child is 4 isn't
always the case with every Autistic child.

coconut
02-11-12, 07:33 PM
Just about every person I know with aspergers says they knew they had it long before they got diagnosed. They said as soon as they saw the list of symptoms they knew they had it.

Years ago there was all this hoopla about people being overdiagnosed with adhd when they never really had it, I think the same thing is going on now with aspergers. For these prefessionals to go diagnosing people with as because they have problems with disorganisation is a bit much.

Yes, I know people diagnosed with it based on that one trait alone, Surely you would need more traits than that.

plank80
02-11-12, 08:30 PM
Just about every person I know with aspergers says they knew they had it long before they got diagnosed. They said as soon as they saw the list of symptoms they knew they had it.

Years ago there was all this hoopla about people being overdiagnosed with adhd when they never really had it, I think the same thing is going on now with aspergers. For these prefessionals to go diagnosing people with as because they have problems with disorganisation is a bit much.

Yes, I know people diagnosed with it based on that one trait alone, Surely you would need more traits than that.

On all the videos on you tube the people say the new the had something wrong with them, they just didn't understand that other people might think or feel differently than them and got confused about social rules. There's just something about like they are slightly aloof and innocent, actually sort of honest looking, I honestly wouldn't mind being like them, but I've never been considered innocent before

I think I would know if I could identify with what they were saying or the way they come across, but I can't at all.

Think you're right, coconut, seems to be in fashion for these psychiatrists to push aspergers these days, for some reason.

fracturedstory
02-12-12, 02:51 AM
So if I have AS can Ritalin work?
Yes it can.

Anyway, to the OP: I guess you're right, short term relationships and having many jobs is common in ADHD.
Your doctor sounds like the reason the autistic spectrum is going to become merged.

I still don't like that Simon Baron Cohen self-test because I don't like Simon Baron Cohen. He basically says that there's little difference between autism and sociopathy and we're all extremely male-brained.


Think you're right, coconut, seems to be in fashion for these psychiatrists to push aspergers these days, for some reason.
It's because they are running out of time to diagnose every man, woman and child and their dog with AS.

Not everyone with AS is the same. I may be the logical and oblivious to what other people think about me type but I know others that aren't. Anywho, I don't believe in a broader autism phenotype and believe AS is present with real impairments and is not just a personality type.

Lunacie would probably jump on me about PDD but PDD is when not enough enough symptoms of autism are present, it has nothing to do with severity...well not always.

Lunacie
02-12-12, 10:34 AM
Yes it can.

Anyway, to the OP: I guess you're right, short term relationships and having many jobs is common in ADHD.
Your doctor sounds like the reason the autistic spectrum is going to become merged.

I still don't like that Simon Baron Cohen self-test because I don't like Simon Baron Cohen. He basically says that there's little difference between autism and sociopathy and we're all extremely male-brained.


It's because they are running out of time to diagnose every man, woman and child and their dog with AS.

Not everyone with AS is the same. I may be the logical and oblivious to what other people think about me type but I know others that aren't. Anywho, I don't believe in a broader autism phenotype and believe AS is present with real impairments and is not just a personality type.

Lunacie would probably jump on me about PDD but PDD is when not enough enough symptoms of autism are present, it has nothing to do with severity...well not always.

For those who may not know, PDD-NOS stands for Pervasive Develop-
mental Disorder Not Otherwise Specified. Yes, it does mean the person
doesn't have quite all the main traits of Autism and nothing about how
severe the traits that are present may be.

There is a lot that isn't understood about Autism yet, just as with ADHD,
and diagnosis is made by looking for certain traits that seem to be
common. Not having one of those traits may not actually mean the person
doesn't have Autism or ADHD.

Even though my granddaughter seems to make eye contact, one cannot
make the conclusion that she is looking at faces in the same way that a
NT person does. It seems that some Autists are able to look at one
portion of another person's face, such as the mouth or nose or forehead
without actually making eye contact for more than a second.

known_guy
02-12-12, 01:56 PM
I still don't like that Simon Baron Cohen self-test because I don't like Simon Baron Cohen. He basically says that there's little difference between autism and sociopathy and we're all extremely male-brained.

I dislike him too. It's really unfortunate how he's one of the best-known (to the public) "experts" on autism. Really unfortunate.

QueensU_girl
02-12-12, 02:16 PM
AD/HD usually has a comorbid condition. Much more often than not, actually...

Not strange at all.

known_guy
02-12-12, 03:28 PM
I dislike him too. It's really unfortunate how he's one of the best-known (to the public) "experts" on autism. Really unfortunate.

Multiple things wrong with that/my last post.

1. Simon Baron-Cohen isn't as bad as I may have made it sound. At least he's one of the people who support keeping AS in the DSM.
2. I should have said "I don't like him either." Because "dislike" and "don't like" are not equivalent.
3. Remove the quotation marks from "experts". That was rather tactless/tasteless.

plank80
02-12-12, 03:56 PM
Also, should I be worried that he uses the term 'attention deficit disorder'?

This was because I only talk fast, fidget and squirm in my seat and he seen no other signs of hyperactivity. I never filled in a scale or anything to indicate severity of symptoms. Is the word hyperkinetic not outdated as well? He basically wrote down that I was lying when I told him I was good at reading people. Why would I do that?

A few other things he wrote make me wonder about this guy as well. I'm well ****** off at his arrogant attitude, assuming things and thinking he's clever.

known_guy
02-12-12, 04:08 PM
Nah, not necessarily. It takes one less time to say "attention-deficit disorder" than "attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder". I've encountered multiple psychiatrists who've said it.
I even say ADD instead of ADHD at times. But maybe this is all because I have or am ADHD-PI.

Fraser_0762
02-12-12, 04:18 PM
Doesn't really matter. "Attention Defecit Disorder" with or without the "Hyperactivity" word in it in pretty useless anyway.

I don't feel that the name really fits the description of the "disorder" all that well.

"Attention Defecit" creates the idea that anybody with ADHD cannot focus on anything. (Of course, thats rubbish, if we couldn't focus at all, we'd be as good as catatonic).

And the "H" for "Hyperactivity" which is also used in ADHD-PI, also creates the idea that everybody with ADHD has to have symptoms of hyperactivity as well.

I also don't feel that "disorder" is the best choice of word either. Because plenty of people with ADHD have gone on to achieve great success in their life. "Disorder" creates the idea of "incapability".

plank80
02-12-12, 04:51 PM
I think disorder is a good description of my brain, tho;)

Lunacie
02-12-12, 06:09 PM
Doesn't really matter. "Attention Defecit Disorder" with or without the "Hyperactivity" word in it in pretty useless anyway.

I don't feel that the name really fits the description of the "disorder" all that well.

"Attention Defecit" creates the idea that anybody with ADHD cannot focus on anything. (Of course, thats rubbish, if we couldn't focus at all, we'd be as good as catatonic).

And the "H" for "Hyperactivity" which is also used in ADHD-PI, also creates the idea that everybody with ADHD has to have symptoms of hyperactivity as well.

I also don't feel that "disorder" is the best choice of word either. Because plenty of people with ADHD have gone on to achieve great success in their life. "Disorder" creates the idea of "incapability".

Dr. Barkley has suggested that a better name or description would be
INTENTION Defecit Disorder, because it's not that we can't pay attention
and learn things as not being able to act on what we know in a timely
manner.

The dictionary says a "disorder" is a disturbance or dysfunction in physical
or mental health. I don't think it gives the impression of "incapability" at
all, only a difficulty in ability.

fracturedstory
02-12-12, 06:51 PM
Even though my granddaughter seems to make eye contact, one cannot
make the conclusion that she is looking at faces in the same way that a
NT person does. It seems that some Autists are able to look at one
portion of another person's face, such as the mouth or nose or forehead
without actually making eye contact for more than a second.
Sometimes people with ASD can make too much eye contact. I tend to do that on Ritalin. Never know when it's too little or enough. But the meds make me stare at faces constantly.

I dislike him too. It's really unfortunate how he's one of the best-known (to the public) "experts" on autism. Really unfortunate.
I'm glad in Australia we have Tony Attwood who writes about how girls are being unrepresented on the spectrum.

I don't agree with a lot of SBC's work. I think AS being removed from the DSM 5 has good intentions but doctors and government services will take advantage of it.

Lunacie
02-12-12, 06:58 PM
Is Asperger's being removed from the next DSM? I thought it was simply
being merged with Autism as part of the same spectrum disorder.

Fortune
02-12-12, 10:21 PM
Is Asperger's being removed from the next DSM? I thought it was simply
being merged with Autism as part of the same spectrum disorder.

The diagnosis "AS" is being removed while criteria for ASD are written to include those diagnosed with AS. The people who are going to be left out are the people diagnosed with PDD-NOS who do not have impairments in all three domains.

Anyway, "disorder" is exactly correct for ADHD, not because it implies "incapacity" (it doesn't), but because ADHD does limit and impair life activities. It doesn't mean you can't be successful. It means that success is harder.

fracturedstory
02-13-12, 06:27 AM
By the way, Fortune, congrats on becoming a moderator.

Also, people with the social difficulties in AS may be able to be diagnosed with social communication disorder.

Autistic disorder is more about rigidity and routines and about who needs support.

Lunacie
02-13-12, 09:24 AM
By the way, Fortune, congrats on becoming a moderator.

Also, people with the social difficulties in AS may be able to be diagnosed with social communication disorder.

Autistic disorder is more about rigidity and routines and about who needs support.

I know people are very concerned about their children loosing their
disability status due to these changes. Even though Atypical Autism is
considered to be PDD-NOS, my granddaughter does pretty well socially
considering her rigidity and routines. She won't be able to finish school if
they take away her support there.

Fortune
02-13-12, 11:16 AM
A lot of people diagnosed PDD-NOS should have been diagnosed differently (and "upgrading" diagnoses to reflect treatment strikes me as dodgy and inconsistent).

fracturedstory
02-14-12, 05:17 AM
I know people are very concerned about their children loosing their
disability status due to these changes. Even though Atypical Autism is
considered to be PDD-NOS, my granddaughter does pretty well socially
considering her rigidity and routines. She won't be able to finish school if
they take away her support there.
She's only young. Social problems can start be be noticed more when kids get into high school because the content of what kids talk about changes.
How is she at having a conversation?

She might just fit the Level 1 type. If she won't be able to finish school than that means she needs supports which is what the severity scale is based on. I need support for sensory integration and socialisation, but I am capable of talking to people.

Lunacie
02-14-12, 09:40 AM
She's only young. Social problems can start be be noticed more when kids get into high school because the content of what kids talk about changes.
How is she at having a conversation?

She might just fit the Level 1 type. If she won't be able to finish school than that means she needs supports which is what the severity scale is based on. I need support for sensory integration and socialisation, but I am capable of talking to people.

Her conversation skills are improving. Slowly. On a good day.

On a not so good day she tends to say "I don't want to talk about it."

Her friends at this point are two neighbor kids who both have ADHD, one
a couple of years younger and one her age, also a kid a couple of years
older who has Bipolar. I know as a kid I felt more comfortable with the
weird kids.

I don't know how much support she's getting, they're trying to get her to
be as independent in her work as possible, but she's still struggling even
with supports.

fracturedstory
02-14-12, 06:59 PM
Her conversation skills are improving. Slowly. On a good day.

On a not so good day she tends to say "I don't want to talk about it."

Her friends at this point are two neighbor kids who both have ADHD, one
a couple of years younger and one her age, also a kid a couple of years
older who has Bipolar. I know as a kid I felt more comfortable with the
weird kids.

I don't know how much support she's getting, they're trying to get her to
be as independent in her work as possible, but she's still struggling even
with supports.
Sounds like me, although I keep the 'I don't feel like talking' to myself. I just try to get away from people.

My best friend has Bipolar,as does her friend who is also my friend too. Although I'm not as close to him. Most members of my family have AS traits or many ADHD ones.
I call the place I live The Mad Jazz House because most of the people my sister knows who are into the jazz scene have medical conditions.

I recently read in an interview that one of the doctors involved with the DSM 5 change actually want people with PDD and AS to get more services. It actually does happen that people without a classic autism diagnosis miss out on support. And I think they are just fine tuning it so that people who need help get it, and enough of this 'identity' thing. I'm very critical to someone who would get diagnosed with something just because it explains why they've felt different all their life. People can argue and flame me all they like but I won't change my mind on this matter. Hardly any other disorder has people with traits of it that recognise the condition in themselves to get diagnosed. You get diagnosed with something to get treatment for it or special services, as is the case for autism.

Fortune
02-14-12, 10:17 PM
This is likely why I like the change in terminology. I have nothing invested in the idea of an "Aspie" identity and I find I disagree with many (not all) who do, who seem to view AS as so mild as to barely be a problem for them.

I didn't feel "different" all my life in the sense that many describe, and I've had to have a lot of things pointed out to me that confirms my diagnosis. I assumed everyone was like me and I was just flawed in some way because I couldn't do all the same things.

fracturedstory
02-16-12, 08:19 PM
I didn't feel different at all. You heard me say many times I thought I was had good social skills by just hanging out with a group and barely speaking. I had to have it pointed out to me or become jealous enough to want to be able to talk to people like they did to each other.