View Full Version : When and How?


Sweet Peach
02-10-12, 02:37 PM
Hi! - So briefly, ADD-PI runs in my family (My dad, brother, and I diagnosed) And I am pretty postive my 6-year-old son has ADD as well. But I'm getting conflicting responses from family/doctors regarding whether or not he is old enough to test. My doctor says "better earlier than later" my brother says "If you test too early the results may be inaccurate, medications could have serious effects on growth, most doctors recommend waiting until 8-10 years old."

Symptoms I'm noticing/examples:
1) trouble staying on task - I tell him to get dressed, he gets one leg in his pants, suddenly stops to turn on the christmas tree lights. (Or put on one shoe and start playing with a toy... while I'm waiting AT the door for him to put his shoes on so we can leave)

2) lack of focus/attention - I told him to put on his seatbelt, he starts unzipping his jacket - I say "Sweetie, that's not what I told you to do" and he'll reply with "OH.. Sorry..." and a cute giggle... shake his head and put on his seatbelt

3) No notes about behaviour problems in school, BUT notes about "needing to complete work"

4) Soccer practices/games - He'd stop chasing the ball to talk to referrees/other players... about random non-soccer related topics

5) Often forgets to turn in his homework packet/notes to his teacher etc... even though I put them in his bag and remind him to make sure he turns it in.

These are just a few examples. I know kids are distractable by nature, but I feel like some of these issues I see are a bit more than "typical 6-year-old" behavior.

Does your child have ADD-PI? How early did you test? Is 6 too early? Did you go through the school, or through the pediatrician?

:thankyou:

Tanaarh
02-11-12, 08:57 AM
My 5 year old son has been diagnosed with ADHD. We got a referral to a paediatrician through our family doctor. I would suggest asking this of your family doctor.
The paediatrician had us and my son's teacher at school complete a Connor's Test which is basically a bunch of questions which you answer based on a scale. This is what led to my son's diagnosis.
Some of the symptoms you are describing sound familiar so I would suggest demanding a referral to the paediatrician. It can't hurt.

happytexas
02-11-12, 11:50 AM
Hi! - So briefly, ADD-PI runs in my family (My dad, brother, and I diagnosed) And I am pretty postive my 6-year-old son has ADD as well. But I'm getting conflicting responses from family/doctors regarding whether or not he is old enough to test. My doctor says "better earlier than later" my brother says "If you test too early the results may be inaccurate, medications could have serious effects on growth, most doctors recommend waiting until 8-10 years old."

What doctors? I've never heard that.

And what test?

ADHD isn't diagnosed by a particular test. Usually a provider has the parents and teachers fill out evaluations on their observations on the child's behavior. If you feel like there is a problem, get the evaluation done. I'd stop discussing it with your family, they aren't living your life and they don't experience your ds the way you do.

Though you can go through the school, I would also do it privately as the school is only concerned about how he is impacted academically, not his overall well being.

At minimum your ds should have a 504 in place; a 504 meeting gets relevant school personnel and parents together in one place to discuss what accommodations may be necessary to help your ds. One may be that the teacher asks your ds for his folder every morning instead of taking the chance he will remember. You could also consider a WatchMinder3 which buzzes to remind the wearer to do things. My ds only uses the alarms before school since they were too distracting for him in school.

As far as growth is concerned it seems that delays in growth usually even out by adulthood, and if not the height "lost" is about a centimeter. Appetite suppression can sometimes be a big enough issue for a child to stop taking a particular medication, but often the effects dissipate enough that you can stay with it by keeping on top of nutrition/calorie intake.

Sometimes children are helped, at least a little, by a fish oil supplement which he should still be able to take if on medication.

Stimulant medication and growth | Parkhurst Exchange (http://www.google.com/url?sa=t&rct=j&q=&esrc=s&source=web&cd=6&ved=0CGkQFjAF&url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.parkhurstexchange.com%2Fcolum ns%2Fpediatrics%2Fsep09_growth&ei=hYQ2T_uxMuOC2AWoldX-AQ&usg=AFQjCNGy8x5iQlQ1o5yeCcBa_xaTaWaahw&sig2=_Q61s4fpcvF-Vlmm5Rr0tQ)

Does Stimulant Medication Stunt Children's Growth? (http://www.google.com/url?sa=t&rct=j&q=&esrc=s&source=web&cd=3&ved=0CEwQFjAC&url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.adhdlibrary.org%2Flibrary%2Fd oes-stimulant-medication-stunt-growth%2F&ei=hYQ2T_uxMuOC2AWoldX-AQ&usg=AFQjCNE7x-ZWzIyKRSNb2PiLuammKv1cWg&sig2=munfSQiNtJ8E0Pz6aamoUQ)

Here is some reading for you:
Dizfriz's Corner. (http://www.addforums.com/forums/showthread.php?t=60130)

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
I recommended reading "Wrightslaw: From Emotions to Advocacy"; the information from the book can be found on their site as well (Table of Contents (http://www.wrightslaw.com/bks/feta/feta.toc.long.htm)). Reading "Wrightslaw: Special Education Law, 2nd Edition," would be a good idea as well).

Under IDEA/IEP, if your child has a disability that adversely affects educational performance, your child is entitled to an education that is designed to meet the child's unique needs and from which your child receives educational benefit.


A 504 is helping your child get the same education that everyone else is getting--more for a student that needs accommodations to help them learn (like sitting next to the teacher) or for behavior, and that they are not punished for things that they cannot control due to the ADHD (like needing to work standing up or not sit inside a group).


[A IEP or 504 is not an escalation or punishment for the teacher/school. It's more about getting all appropriate parties involved and on the same page. The student, parent/legal guardian, teachers, principals, Pupil Services administrators, support staff (i.e. nurse, counselor, psychologist, language/speech pathologist) as well as the student's physician or therapist may be involved in the placement process including the 504 meeting.]

Eligibility under IDEA for Other Health Impaired Children (http://sogpubs.unc.edu/electronicversions/slb/slbsum02/article2.pdf)


Key Differences Between Section 504, the ADA, and the IDEA. (http://www.wrightslaw.com/info/sec504.summ.rights.htm)


(http://www.wrightslaw.com/info/sec504.summ.rights.htm (http://www.wrightslaw.com/info/sec504.summ.rights.htm))

If you decide to request the school do education/learning disability testing, you need to "start the clock" in your letter of request; the school has 60 days from the date they received parental consent for evaluation to do one; your written request should note that this letter is the consent for evaluation. (And, if you did not do it in writing, it never happened!).

Determining Eligibility: How Many Days is 60 Days? - Wrightslaw (http://www.wrightslaw.com/blog/?p=130)

The Art of Writing Letters by Pam and Pete Wright - Advocacy ... (http://www.wrightslaw.com/advoc/articles/DRAFT_Letters.html)


Key Differences Between Section 504 and IDEA (http://www.wrightslaw.com/howey/504.idea.htm)

(http://www.wrightslaw.com/howey/504.idea.htm) (http://www.wrightslaw.com/howey/504.idea.htm)

Is a Child with ADD/ADHD Eligible for Special Education? - Wrightslaw (http://www.wrightslaw.com/advoc/ltrs/eligibility_add.htm)

sarahsweets
02-11-12, 12:30 PM
My son was diagnosed when he was 3.5. He began meds at age 4. This was an agonizing choice to make. He is now 16. His IQ is off the charts, he's in honors classes and a big boy. He towers over me at 6ft and eats everything in sight. I'm proud of my choice. I didn't just give him the tools for life I gave him ammo.

Lunacie
02-11-12, 01:21 PM
Getting a diagnosis does not mean you have to start giving stimulant
meds. I agree with your doctor that early intervention is much better
than waiting until your child may become so frustrated with himself
and have his self esteem head into the sewer.

Dizfriz's Corner (http://www.addforums.com/forums/showthread.php?t=60130) has already been mentioned, you'll find lots of helpful
information there and tips on how to work with your child whether
you decide to medicate or not. Things like a good diet, good sleeping
habits, and supplements like Omega 3 (fish oil) are a good way to
start, and meds may not be needed for some time if at all.

However, the meds for ADHD have an excellent track record, some
for over 60 years, and they Do Not cause Serious effects on growth.
The effect on growth is actually small and generally the child catches
up in size with his peers within a few years.
http://www.additudemag.com/addnews/70/6940.html