View Full Version : Brain imaging in infants can help to detect Autism


LynneC
02-17-12, 10:20 AM
I saw this today and thought it might be of interest...
http://healthland.time.com/2012/02/17/brain-imaging-could-detect-autism-risk-in-infants-as-young-as-6-months/

fracturedstory
02-17-12, 07:16 PM
I saw this today. Very interested in it.

I wonder if early in life there is an over development in the autistic brain and then by two years old it just slows down, even more than NT children? It may have something to do with the sensory pathways never developing properly. It's know that most babies have synaesthesia and then as they grow older lose that skills but like 80% of people with an ASD have synaesthesia. The overload may lead to autistic symptoms that are now visible. I sure know what my sensory issues can do to me and I know that the more exposure results in brain changes, or even damage.

Just a quick un-medicated hypothesis of mine.

And this:
http://healthland.time.com/2011/05/03/brain-size-early-growth-clues-to-autisms-causes/?iid=obinsite

Vector
02-27-12, 12:16 PM
Wow, one would think that a quickly developing brain would be a good thing. Why this could lead to autism is a mystery to me. I would love to know this reason.

It may have something to do with the sensory pathways never developing properly. It's know that most babies have synaesthesia and then as they grow older lose that skills but like 80% of people with an ASD have synaesthesia. The overload may lead to autistic symptoms that are now visible. I sure know what my sensory issues can do to me and I know that the more exposure results in brain changes, or even damage.

I am not too sure about your hypothesis, FracturedStory. The article says that all the brain regions are developing more quickly, so I assume that sensory inhibitory functions are developed proportionally.

fracturedstory
02-27-12, 08:16 PM
Mile stones for babies are spaced out. It gives time to develop a balanced brain. When the brain develops too fast maybe there's not enough time for this process to work. Take into account all the outside stimuli going into a brain that is growing at a rapid pace. I think the stopping and slowing down could be overload. By around 1 year old I think the sensory pathways separate into their own functions but this doesn't always happen with autistics which puts more stress and confusion on them when they interact with the environment.

I wish I could be a neuroscientist so I could do proper research on this.

You know that thinking fast in the ADHD brain doesn't always work out. We get easily bored, we frustrate people when we change the conversation over and over again, and we miss out on vital details. To me it's all about balance. The brain needs to grow at the average rate it does so it doesn't become overwhemled. I used to sit in a corner and stare at objects. I couldn't look at people. I don't remember much about myself when I was a toddler but people said I was slow and aloof. Now I know that sensory overload does that to me and also I tend to think more about things than speak. It's like my brain is so overactive I can't function in my environment.

I don't know. I'm just trying to work out why my brain works the way it does.

Vector
02-28-12, 01:48 PM
Yes, I think you are right about that. Those huge numbers of neurons need to get wired in a right way. Incorrect wiring can probably lead to disabilities like autism and ADHD.