View Full Version : Experience with clonidine?


patrickfellowes
02-19-12, 11:32 AM
28 y/o male with ADHD. New to forum. I have been on methylphenidate since 1st grade and responded well. Wellbutrin added in 1998 to help with generic Ritalin's side effects (nervousness, appetite suppression). I have had bad anxiety and doc finally added Lexapro six months ago. Gave me a new lease on life. Family has said I seem to "enjoy life more."

So, I'll get to the point. I grind my teeth at night (bruxism) very aggressively. This might be a side effect of Ritalin, however, I believe I inherited this behavior from my mom. She has never been on Ritalin. My brother, also not on Ritalin (because he has drug abuse history) also grinds his teeth. Doc put me on 0.1mg of clonidine (generic Catapres). Grinding decreased but still a problem. He increased it to 0.2mg of clonidine, and grinding is rare now.

I have been on clonidine for about a month. In the last few weeks, I've felt very fatigued. I feel like I do when I took two benadryl the night before (this is the best comparison I can think of).

Does anyone with clonidine experience also have fatigue issues? This might be related to something else in life...bad weather, stress, etc., so I hate to immediately get off the clonidine. However, my doc said I should gradually get off of it and if I start feeling less fatigued then we will know it was the clonidine. Any advice, feedback, etc. would be appreciated.

namazu
02-19-12, 09:00 PM
Sedation is a known possible side effect of clonidine, so that seems like a good first guess, especially if the fatigue coincides with starting the clonidine or raising the dose. It's often reported to decrease within a few weeks, though your mileage may vary. It doesn't seem to be a problem for me, but everyone responds differently.

I wonder if there might be a form of clonidine that would help with the bruxism but not leave you groggy in the morning. Possibly a shorter-acting form or taking it earlier in the evening could help.

It sounds like your doctor's advised you to discontinue it, though? Is the plan to try again with a lower dose, change meds (to another alpha-agonist like guanfacine or something else), try a mouth guard at night, or just live with the bruxism? In any case, you probably have options.

Best wishes!

patrickfellowes
02-20-12, 03:37 PM
Thanks for the feedback, namazu. I was on it at 0.1mg for a few weeks and was still grinding, so he took me up to 0.2mg. Seemed to help but I have been just dreadfully tired and he said best way to deal with it is just get off of it and then try it again in a few months. I'm working full time and studying for a certification exam so he said we'd just wait until I'm done with the exam. Given how tired I've been recently, and because not much else in my life has changed other than taking the clonidine, I think it's the clonidine and agree that I might as well wait until I'm done with the exam.

I thought about asking about a short acting alternative and will definitely ask him.

He said that guanfacine is not an acceptable alternative for trying to reduce bruxism but didn't elaborate as to why not. I wear a mouth guard so there won't be damage to my teeth. My jaw clicks, however, and I've had dentists tell me that grinding for years can damage the jaw and internal lubrication it has. Also, I've been told the grinding interferes with sleep. But, at this point, I told my doc I'd rather grind and feel good the next day than take the clonidine, not sleep, and feel like I've only gotten a few hours of sleep the night before.

In summary, I will ask about a short-acting alternative and report back if I ever finish this exam! Thanks again!

namazu
02-20-12, 07:43 PM
Thanks for the feedback, namazu. I was on it at 0.1mg for a few weeks and was still grinding, so he took me up to 0.2mg. Seemed to help but I have been just dreadfully tired and he said best way to deal with it is just get off of it and then try it again in a few months. I'm working full time and studying for a certification exam so he said we'd just wait until I'm done with the exam. Given how tired I've been recently, and because not much else in my life has changed other than taking the clonidine, I think it's the clonidine and agree that I might as well wait until I'm done with the exam.

[...] But, at this point, I told my doc I'd rather grind and feel good the next day than take the clonidine, not sleep, and feel like I've only gotten a few hours of sleep the night before.

Yeah, that makes a lot of sense. Since the grinding is not good long-term, but it's not something you have to address "right this minute", and you have the mouth guard already, it seems totally reasonable to wait until you're through with the exam to try to sort out any medical intervention.

Hope it all goes well!

hollywood
02-21-12, 04:50 PM
yeah, I find intuniv and tenex sedating. I don't know how long it lasts, but it really improves working memory.

ryeates1
02-27-12, 11:42 AM
I am a 54 year old male.I have also started taking conidine w/ adderall. I was on 30 mg twice a day but could not fall asleep so doc cut me back to 30 mg. started on . I also have grinding and rubbing of my chin issues and biting the inside of my mouth and i am sure its from adderal. I have also noticed a lot of fatigue and lack of energy with clonidine and wondering if i will work thru it. the clonidine at this point is not helping at all with any add symptons. my game plan is to stop the clonidine if this does not subside.

hollywood
02-27-12, 03:34 PM
I've had different reactions to the alpha agonists. I really am starting to not like the time released formulations. I cannot tell whats going on with that stuff, and it creates alot of anxiety worrying what will happen when it goes into effect. I had alot of fatigue at times with tenex and intuniv. I think it had alot of benefits with working memory and making me not have any robotic stimulant side effects. Not sure what to do at this point and what direction to go . I have some form of worrying anxiety and am trying and snri but I'm not at the therapeutic dose level yet but I also noticed that tenex had a real impact on improving my working memory and attention and really helped anxiety to boot . For some reason I had chest pain on it so I stopped .

apollo74
05-02-13, 09:05 AM
Hi Patrickfellows,

I am a long term sufferer(15 yrs) of bruxism and have triedn every medication,therapy, mouthguard under the sun with not a great deal of success . Based on the studies my UK doctor agreed to prescribe me Clonodine to try for the bruxism , but I am unsure how to prioceed with it,.

How did you get on with it ? The study carried out at Montreal University used 0.3 mg of Clonidine which helped reduce bruxsim a lot with the participants, but caused low blood pressure problems in 20% of the participants. I may start on 0.2mg , so would be really interested to hear how you got on.

Many Thanks

Apollo74



28 y/o male with ADHD. New to forum. I have been on methylphenidate since 1st grade and responded well. Wellbutrin added in 1998 to help with generic Ritalin's side effects (nervousness, appetite suppression). I have had bad anxiety and doc finally added Lexapro six months ago. Gave me a new lease on life. Family has said I seem to "enjoy life more."

So, I'll get to the point. I grind my teeth at night (bruxism) very aggressively. This might be a side effect of Ritalin, however, I believe I inherited this behavior from my mom. She has never been on Ritalin. My brother, also not on Ritalin (because he has drug abuse history) also grinds his teeth. Doc put me on 0.1mg of clonidine (generic Catapres). Grinding decreased but still a problem. He increased it to 0.2mg of clonidine, and grinding is rare now.

I have been on clonidine for about a month. In the last few weeks, I've felt very fatigued. I feel like I do when I took two benadryl the night before (this is the best comparison I can think of).

Does anyone with clonidine experience also have fatigue issues? This might be related to something else in life...bad weather, stress, etc., so I hate to immediately get off the clonidine. However, my doc said I should gradually get off of it and if I start feeling less fatigued then we will know it was the clonidine. Any advice, feedback, etc. would be appreciated.

williamrobertmc
06-22-13, 12:30 PM
The only way to stop grinding your teeth is to block your nose up and your brain will tell your mouth to stay open. It worked for me. Hope it helps

HADDaball
03-07-14, 04:14 PM
It might be worms.

http://sunrisefamilydentists.com/blog/three-common-teeth-grinding-causes-2/

thomasl
04-28-14, 05:18 PM
My fiance' has been struggling with a grinding problem forever and recently got it under control with a mouth guard named "grind no more" that is very small and effective for her. They are disposable (3 uses) and not really expensive but they aren't cheap either, but they are a must have for her. She told me that it could effect her jaw and her sleep because her dreams when she grinded were never good.

Naussicaa
05-01-14, 03:06 AM
Saw a few posts on grinding teeth, sounds like you guys don't have enough magnesium in your diets. Leafy greens, or chelated magnesium, not the oxide crap.

InvitroCanibal
07-10-14, 11:19 PM
It stimulates the alpha agonist epinephrine receptors so that your body compensates to calm you down without true peripheral or cognitive stimulation. Strattera actually does what clonidine does but on a broader scale.

I tried both and ill say strattera at low doses is effective and clonidine just wasnt effective enough for me. It seemed to work at first but I found out it also inhibits and negatively affects acetylcholine pathways as most medications do in one way or another.

Ive gathered from my own research that ach deficiency is part of the problem of add/adhd. Our diets tend to filter a lot of ach from our foods.

Ive found superior (and cheaper) to both clonidine and strattera is nicotine and caffeine with my meds. Low doses of a cup of green tea a day and a 14mg nicotine patch.

I take this with dexedrine and it is for lack of a better word, perfect. The nicotine stimulates ach release as well as act like ach on the ach and nicotonic receptors. The caffeine plays the role of what strattera used to do for me and what clonidine did not.

This is tricky to recommend though as my blood pressure and heart rate do not change from all these things. However I'd be afraid to recommend it to someone without doctor supervision as I've had.

So an alternative is ginko biloba and l huperzine a which are both good at what they do. Ginko acts as an NRI that is not selective, l huperzine a acts as an ache inhibitor so it prevents the break down of ach. Slows it down really.

I think these secondary options are better but also more expensive.

Ofcourse always consult your doctor first before adding any kind of cns supplement.

Ach rich foods are eggs and veggies fyi. Sometimes just this diet change has dramatic results as seen in school studies where they changed the childrens food plans to mostly whole raw veggies. Cooked veggies tend to lose their choline levels. Its why raw is superior. Milk is said to contain choline but its hard to say since it is pasteurized.

And ofcourse exercise has a direct effect on choline levels as ach is required for muscle retraction and so exercising increases the demands and methylation of choline in the liver. This may be exercises secret for neural protection but I dont know for sure.

Oh yes and before you argue add/adhd is purely a dopamine issue, id suggest you look into the fact that these meds have a very general effect on all our neuro transmitters, especially amphetamine which release ach as well as dopamine.

Good luck

immago
07-25-14, 11:02 PM
It stimulates the alpha agonist epinephrine receptors so that your body compensates to calm you down without true peripheral or cognitive stimulation. Strattera actually does what clonidine does but on a broader scale.

I tried both and ill say strattera at low doses is effective and clonidine just wasnt effective enough for me. It seemed to work at first but I found out it also inhibits and negatively affects acetylcholine pathways as most medications do in one way or another.

Ive gathered from my own research that ach deficiency is part of the problem of add/adhd. Our diets tend to filter a lot of ach from our foods.

Ive found superior (and cheaper) to both clonidine and strattera is nicotine and caffeine with my meds. Low doses of a cup of green tea a day and a 14mg nicotine patch.

I take this with dexedrine and it is for lack of a better word, perfect. The nicotine stimulates ach release as well as act like ach on the ach and nicotonic receptors. The caffeine plays the role of what strattera used to do for me and what clonidine did not.

This is tricky to recommend though as my blood pressure and heart rate do not change from all these things. However I'd be afraid to recommend it to someone without doctor supervision as I've had.

So an alternative is ginko biloba and l huperzine a which are both good at what they do. Ginko acts as an NRI that is not selective, l huperzine a acts as an ache inhibitor so it prevents the break down of ach. Slows it down really.

I think these secondary options are better but also more expensive.

Ofcourse always consult your doctor first before adding any kind of cns supplement.

Ach rich foods are eggs and veggies fyi. Sometimes just this diet change has dramatic results as seen in school studies where they changed the childrens food plans to mostly whole raw veggies. Cooked veggies tend to lose their choline levels. Its why raw is superior. Milk is said to contain choline but its hard to say since it is pasteurized.

And ofcourse exercise has a direct effect on choline levels as ach is required for muscle retraction and so exercising increases the demands and methylation of choline in the liver. This may be exercises secret for neural protection but I dont know for sure.

Oh yes and before you argue add/adhd is purely a dopamine issue, id suggest you look into the fact that these meds have a very general effect on all our neuro transmitters, especially amphetamine which release ach as well as dopamine.

Good luck

Why not just take Choline? Is it not powerful enough?

Be very careful
05-25-17, 02:10 PM
Ive found superior (and cheaper) to both clonidine and strattera is nicotine and caffeine with my meds. Low doses of a cup of green tea a day and a 14mg nicotine patch.

I take this with dexedrine and it is for lack of a better word, perfect. The nicotine stimulates ach release as well as act like ach on the ach and nicotonic receptors. The caffeine plays the role of what strattera used to do for me and what clonidine did not.

Oh yes and before you argue add/adhd is purely a dopamine issue, id suggest you look into the fact that these meds have a very general effect on all our neuro transmitters, especially amphetamine which release ach as well as dopamine.
Good luck

Good post IC..sorry for the quote edits.
I just wanted to reinforce the benefits of nicotine as a dopamine agonist, I worked at a major mental health facility in Canada and it is no coincidence that residential mental health patients are dis-proportionally more likely to be smokers than the general population.
This makes perfect sense for me as it is apparent from my anecdotal observation that the dopamine agonist benefits of smoking (or nicotine therapy) is simply a form of self soothing and self medication for these individuals and not a function of their inability to understand the risks associated with smoking.
I have heard rumours that big pharma is looking to nicotine therapy as the next big cash cow similar to the introduction of SSRIs.
In fact at one point we had to lower the ethanol content in the hand sanitizer machines because patients were setting themselves on fire but that is another story.
Obviously, vaping or using the patch or gum is a much safer ROA tham smoking.
my 2 cents