View Full Version : the merit of meditation...


varied_in_style
03-28-12, 04:34 AM
I'm posting this more out of curiosity than anything else, but... I was wondering if meditation could work for me. I find my thoughts race quite badly sometimes, yet at other times... my mind is uncomfortably blank. I don't know how to explain it. But more than that, I was wondering if it could help with my discipline at all, like in how I think about things in my everyday life. I guess what I mean is, how useful would it be to learn about, to study. I assume it would be calming, but I'm not exactly the most patient or disciplined of people. Would it be worth it to look into?

Pumbaa
03-28-12, 07:40 AM
I've been mediating for years and it does wonders.

When I became a Buddhist, it all came together and my life is much more peaceful

When I feel my mind racing, then I can immediately start counting my breaths and instant calm.

varied_in_style
03-28-12, 04:55 PM
Thank you for the insight. I think I'm hoping it can help me to keep my cool better at work. I get annoyed pretty easily, and I'm a bit ashamed of that. I'm too proud yet to go to the doctor and see if any kind of medication would help me.

Alexis
03-28-12, 11:55 PM
i realy want to do this as I am like VIS
my problem is my inability to maintain routine
my mind is a constant roller coaster of extremes and intermitant lethargy
I'd love to be able to do this as I'm sure it'd realy help
how does it work?

varied_in_style
03-29-12, 12:04 AM
Honestly, I have to do a bit of research on it myself. I don't know very much about it, which is why I'm thinking of looking into it in the first place. It does look promising, though.

Flory
03-29-12, 12:35 AM
i havent tried meditation...but martial arts :D i find it really helps me i do taekwondo and the discipline, structure, energy release, stress busting and quick change between tasks is very good at keeping me going :) might be worth a try too..there are a few articles floating about regarding the benefits of ADHD and martial arts too :)

Flory
03-29-12, 12:37 AM
we did however have a couple of sessions at school (quite a while back now) of trying to meditate but i got sent out for fooling around...i was disrupting everybody else because i could sit still with my eyes closed :s i would definitely try it properly now though...perhaps under the influence of concerta however :p

varied_in_style
03-29-12, 12:46 AM
i havent tried meditation...but martial arts :D i find it really helps me i do taekwondo and the discipline, structure, energy release, stress busting and quick change between tasks is very good at keeping me going :) might be worth a try too..there are a few articles floating about regarding the benefits of ADHD and martial arts too :)

I tried martial arts years ago, I'd feel too awkward to go back to it now, though. Although, it would probably be a nice way to get in shape. *ponder*

be0lie0ves
03-29-12, 12:59 AM
Meditation can be really hard for ADDers to learn. I tried it years ago with little success (I'd either fall asleep or I wouldn't be able to quiet the "Drunken Monkey"). It was only with the help of a verbal guide that I learn to do it on my own. Listening to her voice gave me something to focus on other than my breathing. And with practice I learned to do it on my own (It was still her voice as a guide, just in my head).

The meditation was immensely helpful, but it's hard for me to find the time now.

It would be worth your time to try to learn.

varied_in_style
03-29-12, 02:15 AM
Meditation can be really hard for ADDers to learn. I tried it years ago with little success (I'd either fall asleep or I wouldn't be able to quiet the "Drunken Monkey"). It was only with the help of a verbal guide that I learn to do it on my own. Listening to her voice gave me something to focus on other than my breathing. And with practice I learned to do it on my own (It was still her voice as a guide, just in my head).

The meditation was immensely helpful, but it's hard for me to find the time now.

It would be worth your time to try to learn.

That's good to know, thank you. I remember some time last year a shop in the mall was advertising meditation classes. I was really tempted to join, but with my job I get crazy odd hours. But lately my hours have been on the lower end so I may look into that now. I'd end up trying on my own otherwise, and I'll probably have the same trouble. :D

βĩο₱Ħعℓĩᶏ
03-29-12, 02:34 AM
Meditation is being.
Breathing, moving,
Waking conscious awareness
Without chasing your mustang mind
Without breathing in dusty thoughts kicked up
You watch the cloud of any thought form
giddy throngs, frantic stampeding, forlorn walks
You watch the hooves stamp the ground,
You begin to see how thoughts that feel as fun as
Summer time thunder storms, or as serious as
The overdue 100 year earthquake, or as brilliant as
The one who sees your fire, are ephemeral clouds,
And chasing them for an evanescence prize
Is easy to turn down when you consciously decide
To just let yourself be,
non-fractured,
Perfect and
complete
animal
being
Makes being human possible.

Bathing and drinking from the spring of times unreality,
Periodically dampens the dirt, making losing or gaining time
Irrelevant when all you have is now
And if only briefly
You can come into your senses and
Let your sensual nature tingle
Hairs caught in a draft, the sound of the hollow room against the soundscape of a bustling down town,
What is the experience of wetness?
What is the experience of notes in music and wine?

Makes living constrained by time possible by priming
You to be proactive and aware
You're not always feeling like you are either
Behind or lost or
Trying to constantly catch up
Taking your sweet time or in a rush
Steady and even, balanced and ready
For leisurely walks, uplifting trots,
And qicker recoveries after a fall
Each time building strength
And robust equanimity



Living and doing is easier when you're not choking on dust from
Tripping over any random neural connection.
It's nice to see those things for what they are and what they do.
They steal your self away.
They are the fine details keeping you from owning yourself.




You relax and see a dust cloud for what it is. Dust.

βĩο₱Ħعℓĩᶏ
03-29-12, 03:07 AM
To answer Your questions. Yes, you would likely find benefit from meditation. (for a computer analogy, sometimes you have to check out system activity and close open programs clogging your ram.)

I'm like you, a moody *****, and after years of working and observing, quite simple to say some time words flow like chianti and other times they stagnate and dry up in totality, each extreme leaving me slack jawed and tense, a sure bet for naive reactivity to take hold and decided my moods were others, preventing the understanding my reactions are me.

Basically, touching what home is, being in my skin,
Is necessary for being aware of what tendriles
Are penetrating into my foundation, the reptilian brain

Ok. Bedtime! Goodnight!

varied_in_style
03-29-12, 04:13 AM
To answer Your questions. Yes, you would likely find benefit from meditation. (for a computer analogy, sometimes you have to check out system activity and close open programs clogging your ram.)

I'm like you, a moody *****, and after years of working and observing, quite simple to say some time words flow like chianti and other times they stagnate and dry up in totality, each extreme leaving me slack jawed and tense, a sure bet for naive reactivity to take hold and decided my moods were others, preventing the understanding my reactions are me.

Basically, touching what home is, being in my skin,
Is necessary for being aware of what tendriles
Are penetrating into my foundation, the reptilian brain

Ok. Bedtime! Goodnight!

I couldn't have said that better. Especially your first post! I should be heading off to bed myself, but thank you. I am definitely going to look into it, sooner rather than later.

Alexis
03-29-12, 05:30 AM
very inspiring, I'm going to just give it a go as soon as I get the chance
I loved your post βĩο₱Ħعℓĩᶏ
very illuminating
I think I understand the principle
it's just to be and not to do
as indeed we are human beings not human doings
I've got to do it
thanks

1822

Unmanagable
03-31-12, 05:44 AM
The breathing technique is the instant stress relief, in my opinion, and keeping my back straight during meditation were the first two things I had to learn prior to feeling any effectiveness.

I then came across the Chopra Center 21 day free guided meditation with David Ji. Having the guide talk me through it helped big time. Lots of you tube videos have different styles. Drumming/rythm meditation is one, walking meditation, chanting meditation. So many types and no worong way to do any of them. That's the beauty of it.

You just have to keep trying til one clicks with ya'. Try a minute and work up from there. It's been a lifesaver for me. But I have to remember to be consistent in practicing it to continue to get the positive benefits.

βĩο₱Ħعℓĩᶏ
04-03-12, 11:15 PM
very inspiring, I'm going to just give it a go as soon as I get the chance
I loved your post βĩο₱Ħعℓĩᶏ
very illuminating
I think I understand the principle
it's just to be and not to do
as indeed we are human beings not human doings
I've got to do it
thanks

1822

Yes and no...

To be: To exist or live?
I am.
You are.
They are.
We all are.
(From plankton photosynthesizing to cats napping, from lizards sunning to green tipped buds unfurling.)

Maybe Spanish can help.
Ser and Estar.
Both mean "to be," but
subtle difference is revealing.

"Ser" speaks to essence and
"Estar" to condition.

"Ser" occurs in time and true at all times
(constants, identity).
"Estar" passes through time
(states of being, condition and motion, locality).

You always are, so long as you live.

Unmanagable
04-04-12, 12:08 AM
Thought some folks may benefit from these:

Excellent breathing instruction:

http://thejimdonovanblog.blogspot.com/2009/03/how-to-breathe-consciously-3-easy-steps.html


This combines breathing technique with movement/rhythm:

http://thejimdonovanblog.blogspot.com/2010_10_01_archive.html

ana futura
04-06-12, 12:28 AM
I've practiced martial arts and yoga on and off for a number of years, but up until a few months ago I found sitting meditation extremely hard. I felt like I didn't receive any benefit from it. Then I went to a free training session at a zen center, and it helped immensely.

For the longest time I would try to stop my thoughts when I tried to meditate, but it never worked. My brain just got louder and louder. But meditation is not about the absence of thought, or driving thought away. One should acknowledge the thought. Don't engage, just acknowledge it, and let it go on its way.

The folks at the zen center explained it like this- You see a ripple in a pond, and you try to get rid of it by slapping at it. This will only makes more ripples! Instead, just look at it, sit there for a moment and relect on it if you need, eventually the ripple will go away. I did have a ton of thoughts while I sat (for an hour and a half!) but everything just made so much sense. Every thought I had was a thought I needed to have at that time, and I learned to let them come, and go.

I received tremendous benefit from meditating in this manner, it took away my anxiety and anger, and I felt incredibly focused and peaceful (although a bit slow) I felt concretely "changed" for a bit over 2 days afterwards. As this was pre diagnosis, I didn't really know how to interpret my experience. I was a bit freaked out by it actually! But now I've learned that I felt somewhat similar to how I feel on meds, so clearly something chemical happened in my brain.

At first I was terrified to repeat this experience- what if I tried again and nothing happened? I was afraid my expectations would get in the way. I'm just finally ready now to try it again, hopefully introducing it into my life as a frequent practice.

ana futura
04-06-12, 12:30 AM
Also- having a mantra to repeat is incredibly helpful.

mattwithadd
04-06-12, 04:27 AM
I've practiced martial arts and yoga on and off for a number of years, but up until a few months ago I found sitting meditation extremely hard. I felt like I didn't receive any benefit from it. Then I went to a free training session at a zen center, and it helped immensely.

For the longest time I would try to stop my thoughts when I tried to meditate, but it never worked. My brain just got louder and louder. But meditation is not about the absence of thought, or driving thought away. One should acknowledge the thought. Don't engage, just acknowledge it, and let it go on its way.

The folks at the zen center explained it like this- You see a ripple in a pond, and you try to get rid of it by slapping at it. This will only makes more ripples! Instead, just look at it, sit there for a moment and relect on it if you need, eventually the ripple will go away. I did have a ton of thoughts while I sat (for an hour and a half!) but everything just made so much sense. Every thought I had was a thought I needed to have at that time, and I learned to let them come, and go.

I received tremendous benefit from meditating in this manner, it took away my anxiety and anger, and I felt incredibly focused and peaceful (although a bit slow) I felt concretely "changed" for a bit over 2 days afterwards. As this was pre diagnosis, I didn't really know how to interpret my experience. I was a bit freaked out by it actually! But now I've learned that I felt somewhat similar to how I feel on meds, so clearly something chemical happened in my brain.

At first I was terrified to repeat this experience- what if I tried again and nothing happened? I was afraid my expectations would get in the way. I'm just finally ready now to try it again, hopefully introducing it into my life as a frequent practice.

This is the key for the folks who have a hard time with anger, or fast emotional reactions.

As you meditate, and you 'become the observer' it will strengthen the observer part of you. As you become more practiced, the observer will spill over into your regular day to day life. Situations that might set a person off will usually cause observation first, rather than an immediate outward rteaction. This helps a person by giving them time to parse their emotions internally first through observation, and then one will realize that the immediate reaction is not helpful, and it can be let go of immediately.

Meditation has helped me immensely, not to quiet my mind, but rather just becoming more 'self aware.' This is called mindfulness. It also helps in many other areas, such as a person who is always negative in their thinking. They can observe their negative thoughts, start to realize how irrational they usually are, then become accepting of them and understanding where they come from. Once that point is reached, its easier to let them go and replace them with positive, rational thoughts.

I would recommend meditationa dn mindfulness to anyone, normal, or mentally impaired.

ana futura
04-08-12, 08:23 PM
This is the key for the folks who have a hard time with anger, or fast emotional reactions...

Meditation has helped me immensely, not to quiet my mind, but rather just becoming more 'self aware.' This is called mindfulness. It also helps in many other areas, such as a person who is always negative in their thinking. They can observe their negative thoughts, start to realize how irrational they usually are, then become accepting of them and understanding where they come from. Once that point is reached, its easier to let them go and replace them with positive, rational thoughts.

So interesting that you put it this way. When I meditate, and after, my mind will go to places I normally don't let it. Learning how to stay with and observe those thoughts (like "why exactly do I hate this one particular co-worker so much") is the most profound aspect of meditation for me.

I find that moving meditation type activities, like yoga and martial arts, are good for quieting my mind and bringing me peace.

Sitting meditation, on the other hand, can actually be a little upsetting to me because it makes me confront things I'd prefer to ignore.

βĩο₱Ħعℓĩᶏ
05-03-12, 12:50 PM
So interesting that you put it this way. When I meditate, and after, my mind will go to places I normally don't let it. Learning how to stay with and observe those thoughts (like "why exactly do I hate this one particular co-worker so much") is the most profound aspect of meditation for me.

I find that moving meditation type activities, like yoga and martial arts, are good for quieting my mind and bringing me peace.

Sitting meditation, on the other hand, can actually be a little upsetting to me because it makes me confront things I'd prefer to ignore.

My understanding is that current thought is that there are two kinds attentional awareness, externally directed attention, which relies on mostly on functions of the prefrontal cortex, and internally directed attention, which is reliant upon older regions of the brain (eg insular cortex). The neocortex has a conceptual sense or self, but with ADHD, that region of the brain is a little funky, and thus conceptual sense of self as well is affected (horrible self observers... And issues integrating experience continuously due to inattentiveness and poor time conceptualization... Scattered minds, and fragmented senses of self (with other mental disabilities as well))... While introceptive awareness helps with having direct access to emotions and physical sensations.

Why does that matter? Because in times of stress, certain emotions will, regardless of ADHD or otherwise, will overrun the prefrontal cortex... And trying to out think yourself when you're thinking... Called burnout and years of habit... Habituating behaviors in response to stress... Either way...

I dunno where I was, or why.

Have a good day!