View Full Version : What made you certain that you had ADD?


Fraser_0762
03-30-12, 04:27 PM
Assuming you're one of those who grew up and entered adult hood without either never being diagnosed with ADD or knowing anything about it, what was it that caused that final aaaah moment which pushed you over the edge to seek a diagnosis?

At what point did you know (without a doubt) that you had ADD? What pushed you over the edge?

Fuzzy12
03-30-12, 04:32 PM
Fraser, I still don't know. I still have huge doubts. I was almost convinced though when I read Hallowell's Delivered from Distraction. Suddenly everything in my life seemed to make sense. Not just the major symptoms but even the tiny little quirks or character traits that I would have never associated with ADHD (like the constant need for stimulation, the intrusive thoughts, etc.)

It makes a lot of sense and I do seem to fit most symptoms very well. But yes, I've still got my doubts. Probably always will, even if I get a diagnosis. I wish there was a way of knowing for sure, you know, like a blood test or brain scan rather than a very subjective evaluation of my history.

Fraser_0762
03-30-12, 04:37 PM
Fraser, I still don't know. I still have huge doubts. I was almost convinced though when I read Hallowell's Delivered from Distraction. Suddenly everything in my life seemed to make sense. Not just the major symptoms but even the tiny little quirks or character traits that I would have never associated with ADHD (like the constant need for stimulation, the intrusive thoughts, etc.)

It makes a lot of sense and I do seem to fit most symptoms very well. But yes, I've still got my doubts. Probably always will, even if I get a diagnosis. I wish there was a way of knowing for sure, you know, like a blood test or brain scan rather than a very subjective evaluation of my history.

Yeah, I know what you mean. I feel the exact same way.

I'm hoping to relate to other peoples situations on here so I can paint a clearer picture in my mind about what ADHD actually is.

For me, I kind of feel like the missing jigsaw piece in a puzzle. The puzzle being a picture of reality itself. Me being alone on the edge, but never in the centre of the picture where I belong.

Adiosa
03-30-12, 05:15 PM
Hey guys, Im in the same boat. I've been meaning to gogle Add for a while now to see if Ihave it or not, but spaced and forgot to. I took some tests the other day and was like blown away by the way i completely fit the bill. I havent had an official diagnosis, but I know i probably have it, whatever it is. I'm not the hyperactive type, so for a long time i just thought i was forgetful and spacey. My thought would run at a mile a minute, and i would get overwhelmed for no reason. I would get annoyed when i was occupied watching tv or reading, or drawing and then interrupted. When i get bored, im not always bored, it weird, its more like i wann do something i dont kno what just something, and its mentally and physically exhausting

perfectchronic
03-30-12, 05:44 PM
That I couldn't concentrate on anything in highschool, and it's partly the reason I'm not in college right now. Adderall has changed my life in a positive way and has improved the quality of my life.

plank80
03-30-12, 05:44 PM
I still doubt it even after diagnosis. I keep thinking I just need to calm down and sort myself out. I wonder what if the psychiatrist missed something and I have a different disorder or maybe I'm just messed up in the head. Don't think the doubt ever goes away because somewhere deep down you don't want to believe it's a disorder that you're gonna have to deal with the rest of your life.

silivrentoliel
03-30-12, 05:54 PM
I *was* diagnosed as a kid, but *re-diagnosed* twenty-two years later. It was actually a boss telling me I was all over the place at work and quite a few "afternoon" tasks hadn't been completed, but had all been started, and DH telling me to get back on meds or he was out. I knew I had ADHD, but it was my boss and DH that really kicked my butt back into gear...

Fraser_0762
03-30-12, 05:58 PM
I *was* diagnosed as a kid, but *re-diagnosed* twenty-two years later. It was actually a boss telling me I was all over the place at work and quite a few "afternoon" tasks hadn't been completed, but had all been started, and DH telling me to get back on meds or he was out. I knew I had ADHD, but it was my boss and DH that really kicked my butt back into gear...

Wow. If I was with someone who told me they would leave unless I took something (for their own sake), i'd show them the door.

That's probably why i'm alone. :D

I'm not the most committed soul. :rolleyes:

sarahsweets
03-30-12, 06:03 PM
I *was* diagnosed as a kid, but *re-diagnosed* twenty-two years later. It was actually a boss telling me I was all over the place at work and quite a few "afternoon" tasks hadn't been completed, but had all been started, and DH telling me to get back on meds or he was out. I knew I had ADHD, but it was my boss and DH that really kicked my butt back into gear...

youre a better person then me I would have told them to go f**k themselves.

fracturedstory
03-30-12, 06:05 PM
The PI lacking energy, the poor memory and the fact that I got bored 10 minutes watching my favourite band play live and wanted to something else and really struggled to pay attention. And the little hyper outbursts when I'd chase and be chased by my dog.

I don't doubt it for one second...especially today. Sigh.

I know I have more symptoms than that and I have them in the way only an ADHDer can. The type of focus issues I'm having now is due to PI symptoms, unlike the hyper symptoms I was experiencing yesterday and last night my goodness they were so bad. Halfway through a kids movie I was looking around, picking things up and wanted to really play DS. Then the dog came in and I completely forgot about the movie and I started making noises at him. He likes that.

KCTang
03-30-12, 06:06 PM
Besides the whole 'moral guilt' that I've felt before --- from feeling like I just wasnt trying hard enough, instead of it being a mental disorder --- I I used to doubt a lot my diagnosis. And I think it's related to ADHD itself.

This doubt isn't a diagnosed symptom I don't think, but my theory is that it's partly because of our low working memory.

-----

Non ADHD people can do their work while self-monitoring, because they have an extra few units of working memory that they can allocate to that kind of stuff.

We tend to be having a hard enough time blocking out distractions, let alone pay attention, so our lack of working memory makes us struggle to just get the work done. But then we lack that extra unit of WM monitoring ourselves, that would normally save an 'ongoing recording' of what we're doing and how we're progressing.

So when you think about what's causing your screw-ups, you don't know, because you don't have an extra WM watching over your own shoulder. How can you justify to yourself that you have ADHD, when you can't even remember what you're doing to screw up?

-----

As long as your ADHD is untreated, you're going to lack that working memory, and that self-monitoring, and you'll keep doubting things because you just don't have the space to piece together the whole picture.

You also don't have enough working memory in your brain to fit all the pieces of the puzzle at the same time. So you're trying to get the whole frame of reference, but you can only see half, no matter how hard you try. This is the same reason why you might get confused and overwhelmed by too much information or complexity at once.

Fraser_0762
03-30-12, 06:14 PM
The PI lacking energy, the poor memory and the fact that I got bored 10 minutes watching my favourite band play live and wanted to something else and really struggled to pay attention. And the little hyper outbursts when I'd chase and be chased by my dog.

I don't doubt it for one second...especially today. Sigh.

I know I have more symptoms than that and I have them in the way only an ADHDer can. The type of focus issues I'm having now is due to PI symptoms, unlike the hyper symptoms I was experiencing yesterday and last night my goodness they were so bad. Halfway through a kids movie I was looking around, picking things up and wanted to really play DS. Then the dog came in and I completely forgot about the movie and I started making noises at him. He likes that.

I always grew up assuming that this kind of thing was just sort of normal.

Who can resist a doggy woggy. :o I do the same when the cat sneaks into my room. But usually I spend most of the time trying to get her out my room while she hides in all the places where its impossible to reach her. I won't stop trying until I get a hold of her and finally get her out the room, but by then, i've completely forgotton about what I was doing before hand and lose track of what I was supposed to be doing right now. :doh:

Flory
03-30-12, 06:16 PM
my initial diagnosis came in around about way, my cbt therapist picked up the symptoms and referred me..i was in CAMHS at this point, had psychological assessment etc and it went from there really :)

Ballard
03-30-12, 06:23 PM
For me I found out I had ADHD from smoking weed, I never really was around the stuff as a kid because I was home schooled. Smoking weed for me sometimes but not every time(depends on what I'm doing) gave me deep prospective on my life and the ability to question things that didn't make sense. It was somewhat like that movie being john malkovich and being in another persons head and viewing the things I do in real time and questioning it. I was literally stoping myself from leaving a task and turning around and asking why didn't I finish what I started? Sometimes even running back.

Flory
03-30-12, 06:24 PM
i and my parents pretty much suspected it though

plank80
03-30-12, 06:52 PM
Besides the whole 'moral guilt' that I've felt before --- from feeling like I just wasnt trying hard enough, instead of it being a mental disorder --- I I used to doubt a lot my diagnosis. And I think it's related to ADHD itself.

This doubt isn't a diagnosed symptom I don't think, but my theory is that it's partly because of our low working memory.

-----

Non ADHD people can do their work while self-monitoring, because they have an extra few units of working memory that they can allocate to that kind of stuff.

We tend to be having a hard enough time blocking out distractions, let alone pay attention, so our lack of working memory makes us struggle to just get the work done. But then we lack that extra unit of WM monitoring ourselves, that would normally save an 'ongoing recording' of what we're doing and how we're progressing.

So when you think about what's causing your screw-ups, you don't know, because you don't have an extra WM watching over your own shoulder. How can you justify to yourself that you have ADHD, when you can't even remember what you're doing to screw up?

-----

As long as your ADHD is untreated, you're going to lack that working memory, and that self-monitoring, and you'll keep doubting things because you just don't have the space to piece together the whole picture.

You also don't have enough working memory in your brain to fit all the pieces of the puzzle at the same time. So you're trying to get the whole frame of reference, but you can only see half, no matter how hard you try. This is the same reason why you might get confused and overwhelmed by too much information or complexity at once.

Yea the fact I missed my doctors appointment on Monday and this has been a pattern my whole life should go towards convincing me but I seem to keep forgetting that I screw things up all the time. Times and dates just dont register in my brain, I have a real bad time judgement problem.

spunkysmum
03-30-12, 06:58 PM
I don't remember a specific moment, so it must have been a process. It was intuition after reading about it. Once I knew in myself I never had a doubt. When I went to the behavioral health clinic to get officially diagnosed, it was just a formality because I wanted it in writing and to be able to give proof to those who might doubt it. I already knew. If the diagnosis had come back saying I didn't have it, I would have simply known they were wrong, and wouldn't have accepted it as truth. I am glad that it did not, though.

spunkysmum
03-30-12, 07:05 PM
I *was* diagnosed as a kid, but *re-diagnosed* twenty-two years later. It was actually a boss telling me I was all over the place at work and quite a few "afternoon" tasks hadn't been completed, but had all been started, and DH telling me to get back on meds or he was out. I knew I had ADHD, but it was my boss and DH that really kicked my butt back into gear...

In a way, you're very lucky, to have the people around you acknowledge the reality of ADHD and push you to get treatment, unlike a lot of other folks who have to deal with their disorder AND important people in their lives denying the disorder.

fracturedstory
03-30-12, 07:08 PM
I always grew up assuming that this kind of thing was just sort of normal.

Who can resist a doggy woggy. :o I do the same when the cat sneaks into my room. But usually I spend most of the time trying to get her out my room while she hides in all the places where its impossible to reach her. I won't stop trying until I get a hold of her and finally get her out the room, but by then, i've completely forgotton about what I was doing before hand and lose track of what I was supposed to be doing right now. :doh:
I thought everything I did was normal until I was 22. And it took another two years to realise other people could watch a whole 40 minute band set without wanting to leave after two songs. I once had to mentally tell myself "You like this band - they might not be back for another three years - make this night count."

It didn't help that most of people explained away my attention issues as 'an AS thing.' I began to notice that my my memory could have been better if I just had autism.

spunkysmum
03-30-12, 07:15 PM
Fraser, I still don't know. I still have huge doubts. I was almost convinced though when I read Hallowell's Delivered from Distraction. Suddenly everything in my life seemed to make sense. Not just the major symptoms but even the tiny little quirks or character traits that I would have never associated with ADHD (like the constant need for stimulation, the intrusive thoughts, etc.)

It makes a lot of sense and I do seem to fit most symptoms very well. But yes, I've still got my doubts. Probably always will, even if I get a diagnosis. I wish there was a way of knowing for sure, you know, like a blood test or brain scan rather than a very subjective evaluation of my history.

Maybe for you an a-ha moment will come if you manage to get a diagnosis and then get on the right symptoms. It's my understanding that a lot of moms have realized that they had it when they succumbed to the temptation to try taking their kids' ADHD medicine and realized the difference it made.

Arivas721
03-30-12, 08:02 PM
well for me it was not too long ago, watching a daytime tv show and a lady on there that has ADD was talking about all her symptoms and daily distractions, always late, can't be organized to save her life( Sooo me) constant doing a million things but can't finish a one and then frustration at not being able to do the simple things like just finish putting something away with having to go and do something else before I forget. yup and hubby saw and confirmed that definitely sounds like me and then had it confirmed less than a week ago. did I ramble enough? yup thats me too

sarahsweets
03-30-12, 08:29 PM
For me I found out I had ADHD from smoking weed, I never really was around the stuff as a kid because I was home schooled. Smoking weed for me sometimes but not every time(depends on what I'm doing) gave me deep prospective on my life and the ability to question things that didn't make sense. It was somewhat like that movie being john malkovich and being in another persons head and viewing the things I do in real time and questioning it. I was literally stoping myself from leaving a task and turning around and asking why didn't I finish what I started? Sometimes even running back.

How would weed and deep thought lead you to adhd?

Fraser_0762
03-30-12, 08:33 PM
How would weed and deep thought lead you to adhd?

I was thinking this as well.

Wouldn't weed itself create ADD like symptoms?

Flory
03-30-12, 08:35 PM
overrall weed is a pretty bad idea for the adhd'er if it can be best avoided

spunkysmum
03-30-12, 08:38 PM
It didn't help that most of people explained away my attention issues as 'an AS thing.' I began to notice that my my memory could have been better if I just had autism.

I can see that. If a person's already been diagnosed with one disorder, it's probably real easy for people to explain any abnormalities away on that one.

Ballard
03-30-12, 09:46 PM
How would weed and deep thought lead you to adhd?

I couldn't pay attention to my ADHD, pot helped me with that. It also helped with some of my symptoms. I don't smoke anymore and am trying to find a med that works.

Like I told one of my family members, how could I pay attention to the things I do or the way I act when the very disorder is paying attention.

TheChemicals
03-30-12, 10:20 PM
"Blurt out inappropriate comments, show their emotions without restraint, and act without regard for consequences."

When i read this on wikipedia i ran to 3 different doctors only to have each one confirm i had adhd. I did a thyroid test and an ekg to make sure but they came back normal. I even had my intestines checked but everything kept coming back normal.

I fit almost all the symptoms and cant seem to relate to the world....as if im not connected to the human social pipeline so now im certain im adhd.

eeilyk
03-31-12, 12:45 AM
My fidgeting and hyperness, then I learnt more and almost every symptom was like a revelation.
I guess when you grow up without knowing you have it you just think you're a bit more out there than most and you live with the effects because you dont know any better.

tortilaman
03-31-12, 02:02 AM
There was a point where we knew there was something different about me, but it took a while to figure out it was ADHD.

I would go outside to move the car into the garage to avoid getting a ticket, and come back inside a half hour later without having moved the car. Things like that would happen, and I would leave on the stove, it was just a lot of things that would drive my ex-wife nuts that involved memory.

We originally attributed it to side effects from my Epilepsy medication, so started switching meds, then realized it was probably more than that and looked elsewhere. It took somebody else to tell me though.

RainySunShine
03-31-12, 02:28 AM
I was barely clinging to the edge of a cliff when the nails finally ripped off my fingers, and I plummeted to the ground below. I was assigned to a therapist who eventually diagnosed me with ADD. I was skeptical initially but was startled to discover how many of the symptoms were identical to my own. However, reading the stories of others living with ADD is what really convinced me that I could have the disorder. I practically saw my own life being retold by others, and for once, I didn't feel quite so alone.

CheekyMonkey
03-31-12, 02:31 AM
I was in denial for a bit. An ADD friend told me they thought I was. My husband agreed. I decided to write out a list of my life memories to see if they matched. Seeing it all written out in plain site, I knew it. It was a tragedy and relief at the same time.

SweetCode
03-31-12, 03:03 AM
I read a book about it when I was around 17 and I matched most of the points and faced most of the difficulties related to adhd , but my family has a big prejudice when it comes to visit a pdoc , so I procastinated until I started living alone (I was 21) , then I started facing several problems at my work that related to ADHD so I decided to see a doctor just to see what's up , I don't even told about what I suspected and the book , but after two long sessions of questions and a CT scan , I was diagnosed and started on ritalin.

ADDinHDefgHi?!
03-31-12, 05:19 AM
It was a gradual process, I always felt disconnected from the "normal" people. As I got older I realized more and more how hard it was for me to plan and organize my life in a practical way. I would show up for appointments on a Tuesday when I wasn't scheduled till Wednesday, then do the same thing again the next week without even realizing it.

I noticed many of my friends had ADHD, actually it was hard for me to keep NT friends.

Then I looked up the symptoms online and I felt like it was describing me to a T. I asked my parents but they thought that I was just being a hypochondriac like I used to often be.

Then I got in an accident, while in the ER the doc was interviewing me very thoroughly trying to get a picture of why I had certain re occurring problems. He then told me I should be evaluated for ADHD, in front of my mom too. He referred me to a psychiatrist.

I was diagnosed a few months later, and then I really felt like I had ADHD. I could see that there was a huge chunk of life that I never saw until I was put on Ritalin, then Adderall, then back on Ritalin.

I still doubt it sometimes but all it takes is a day or two without meds to erase those doubts.

Snowboarder13
03-31-12, 06:21 AM
So I only starting thinking I had adhd the end of last year aged 24. Then the more I read the more and more I believed I had it. (Also my partner believes I do) <?xml:namespace prefix = o ns = "urn:schemas-microsoft-com:office:office" /><o:p></o:p>
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So I seeked medical advice... After seeing a doctor for 30 minutes and forgetting to tell him of most of the big symptoms and only told him the small symptoms. He came back with answer that I don't have adhd.<o:p></o:p>
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Now I donít want to go see him again as he has already came to a conclusion or anyone else. <o:p></o:p>
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Was on tramadol (Not using as treatment for adhd) the other day surprisingly worked a treat I was very clear headed. Has anyone else found that tramadol has helped?<o:p></o:p>

yepimonfire
04-01-12, 08:12 AM
i could make this a really long post, but for the sake of everyones sanity, and in the interest of my post being read, i won't

what pushed me to go get help was the fact that none of my "behavior modifications" were doing me any bit of good. googling add symptoms it describes me perfectly. i spent nearly six months attempting to change myself and no matter what i did it didn't work, i couldn't remember things for crap, i couldn't focus for crap, i had little motivation to do things that needed done, stupid mistakes were unavoidable regardless of my careful planning to avoid them.

two different things that really pushed me to seek help was the fact school work was taking me ridiculous amounts of time to complete, and it felt insanely difficult to just sit down and study without ending up google earthing iceland or something stupid of that nature.

the second thing was when i actually started taking the meds, my brain completely changed, it was like i was an entirely different person, a functional person. for the longest time i tried saying "i'm just lazy, i need to try harder, i need to get organized, i need to just change my approach to things" etc etc. eventually i gave up and just accepted the fact that this isn't something thats entirely in my control and i realized i was only making my own life 1000x harder by denying the obvious and avoiding treatment.

lost3333
04-01-12, 07:26 PM
I was having troubles getting desk work done. Could not focus at all. Went into the doctor for that as I also started having migraines 3 years prior. She sat and talked with me for the longest time any doctor has ever. Then she told me that I very likely had ADD.

The only things I knew about ADD before were nothing really. I knew a few people in my past that had it, and they were very hyper. I am not (in hindsight physically I am not, mentally yes I am).

I read tons of books (every page! I never do that) and found this site. For the first time, many people sound like me (in my head). The meds are helping me stay with one thought at a time, process and move on.

eclectic beagle
04-01-12, 10:25 PM
I'm not entirely sure what made me think I had/have ADHD. I just look back on my life and think "what the hell was that?" I seem to have many of the symptoms, though. Oh, and I was diagnosed with it, and was thought to have a fairly severe form.

Pamplemousse
04-01-12, 11:51 PM
I started thinking about myself having it when I was 15. I never thought anything of it because I really didn't know a whole lot about it. It started when I had some teachers telling me I couldn't really focus and what not. Then my math tutor is the one who finally came out and said "You seriously need to be evaluated for ADD or something"

I got diagnosed 2 times. Once by a psychologist and then again by my GP. It was after the fact that I started to really put some pieces together, and I started to realize my problems more.

-My physics teacher placed me in the front of the room because he automatically recognized had a horrible time focusing. He told me so. Got yelled at my history teacher for "half-******" everything. Dropped calc cause I was failing. Got yelled at by several teachers for being so disorganized. When I told my best friend I had ADHD (she has it as well) her parents weren't at all surprised because we were so alike as kids. In fact, everybody I told wasn't surprised....thanks for telling me guys. -____-

But yeah, I probably wouldn't be diagnosed right now if my old math tutor hadn't piped up.

thejohnson475
04-02-12, 02:00 AM
I'm a psychology major and during my freshman year we studied the basics of different disorders such as ADD/ADHD, depression, and anxiety and during that semester was when I had that "ahah" moment but it wasn't until the next year midway through my sophomore year when I did something about it.

Naglaa
04-02-12, 04:25 AM
My son is almost 15 years now, and I felt this aaah about 8 years ago after a long history of complains from his teachers at school. I felt this aah during reading an article on the net describing the symptoms of the ADHD. I felt that it is explaining every thing. before reading the article, i was blaming myself for not raising him properly and i was very harsh with him in HW and school staff. after understanding the cause of his behavior, i felt worst as there is no procurement for him and i feel very concerned about his future and career. i will not live forever to support him and i do not how can i help him.

shamrock
04-02-12, 04:34 AM
I was thinking this as well.

Wouldn't weed itself create ADD like symptoms?

No. I wouldnt presume that.
What is it about this drug? It always splits people into 2 camps ie "Its the best thing I ever tried "camp versus the "stay away from it because it will make you worse" camp.

Short answer major clinical depression made me finally deal with it. Every doctor missed Add and after years and years and years of googling I finally got it myself.

shamrock
04-02-12, 04:43 AM
Oh. I think I have just broken guidelines...have I? Sorry mods if I have. I edited and toned down my condoning comments anyway.

deeinsun
04-02-12, 02:19 PM
when a random man tokd me i should seek medical help because I has been fidgeting in a bar, then 12 years on my business partner/ boyfriend asking me after repative errors/ lack of concentration endless list etc did i have adhd. it was a kick & made me think. after alot of tests over weeks all coming out with same answer i didnt feel mad, although up till now most of querks i thought was just me... luckily i have a good gp who went through it all & has started me on 5mg rubifen so i wait now to see if this is answer! although i cant talk to boyfriend as view on taking meds is a no no so struggling to do right thing!

deeinsun
04-02-12, 02:24 PM
fidgety, anxious, lack of concentration, the list goes on but managed to deal with it till now. at 37 felt relief when gp agreed with me after boyfriend asked do you have adhd. to be fair he did me a favor although i have not told him i have been to see someone now as he is against meds. i am trying rubifen 5mg & over nxt few weeks will be assesed. dont doubt yourself if you think you may be havd adhd its treatable & reconised in adults now.

xxbluejay21
04-02-12, 03:26 PM
Hmm... People are just listing symptoms. Not being able to concentrate = 100% certainty that you have ADD? It's confusing, but I think the question is flawed, because ADD isn't like a normal disease (AIDS, Cancer, etc). It's not "you have it or you don't". You can have varying degrees of it, maybe even a slight case that could be passed off as laziness by most people. So thats why I don't think there's an answer for "what made you sure you had add?" because people automatically assume they have ADD if they can't focus or are getting bad grades. And maybe they do have a slight case of it. The thing is, the treatment will still help them. Adderall helps people with ADD, but it could also help people that can already focus focus even better. I think most people have a slight case of ADD. The symptoms are intensified in some by their personality, motivation, or actual brain chemistry.

sarahsweets
04-03-12, 05:17 AM
Hmm... People are just listing symptoms. Not being able to concentrate = 100% certainty that you have ADD? It's confusing, but I think the question is flawed, because ADD isn't like a normal disease (AIDS, Cancer, etc). It's not "you have it or you don't". You can have varying degrees of it, maybe even a slight case that could be passed off as laziness by most people. So thats why I don't think there's an answer for "what made you sure you had add?" because people automatically assume they have ADD if they can't focus or are getting bad grades. And maybe they do have a slight case of it. The thing is, the treatment will still help them. Adderall helps people with ADD, but it could also help people that can already focus focus even better. I think most people have a slight case of ADD. The symptoms are intensified in some by their personality, motivation, or actual brain chemistry.


Adderall helps those with adhd stay on the same level as their NT peers. Most people do not have a "slight " case of adhd. The DSM clearly states adhd must have had a negative impact on your life in all areas for it to be considered adhd.

musiclvr2675
04-03-12, 03:38 PM
I don't remember a specific moment, so it must have been a process. It was intuition after reading about it. Once I knew in myself I never had a doubt. When I went to the behavioral health clinic to get officially diagnosed, it was just a formality because I wanted it in writing and to be able to give proof to those who might doubt it. I already knew. If the diagnosis had come back saying I didn't have it, I would have simply known they were wrong, and wouldn't have accepted it as truth. I am glad that it did not, though.
My son was getting progressively worse at turning in homework and to the point he was failing not just one but multiple classes. I felt if I were not literally there reminding him to stay on task he wouldn't get anything done. I decided that all the time/effort I made with helping him get organized and working with his teachers wasn't enough and I was going to take him to a professional to find out. He always suspected but because I didn't believe ADD was real I dismissed it for a long time. The therapist confirmed it was indeed ADD and so I had to learn more about it so through learning what it actually was is when I learned I had it too. Everything made sense to me about why I lacked certain qualities. I searched on the internet a lot and I've bought a few books of which only one seems to really keep my attention in reading it lol Learning about ADHD is stimulating I guess because I want to help my son and I as best I can.

GQK III
04-03-12, 03:40 PM
I read a checklist for adult AD/HD. It was like they knew me. I'm sure I'm like a lot of others who were diagnosed later in life. I am academically and creatively gifted and that (along with being outgoing and personable:D) covered a lot of my deficits.

By the way, I was 38 when I was diagnosed.

reflection08
04-17-12, 04:11 PM
Fraser, I still don't know. I still have huge doubts. I was almost convinced though when I read Hallowell's Delivered from Distraction. Suddenly everything in my life seemed to make sense. Not just the major symptoms but even the tiny little quirks or character traits that I would have never associated with ADHD (like the constant need for stimulation, the intrusive thoughts, etc.)

It makes a lot of sense and I do seem to fit most symptoms very well. But yes, I've still got my doubts. Probably always will, even if I get a diagnosis. I wish there was a way of knowing for sure, you know, like a blood test or brain scan rather than a very subjective evaluation of my history.
I was diagnosed and I still have doubts about it. I just went to her because of severe insomnia and I left with a "disorder" and a prescription. My husband thinks I'm nuts and that most people would just take the pill and never think about it again. I can't do that and even though it does calm me down I still don't know if I really want to be medicated because the medicated me isn't the me I'm used to. *sigh*

Tylerlee17
04-17-12, 05:14 PM
First 6 months in school at age 6 I had in school suspension at least I'd say 5 times lol. I don't really question it anymore, I did growing up. After high school though the adult world kinda threw me for a loop and at that point I was sure of it.

pechemignonne
04-17-12, 08:25 PM
Hmm... People are just listing symptoms. Not being able to concentrate = 100% certainty that you have ADD? It's confusing, but I think the question is flawed, because ADD isn't like a normal disease (AIDS, Cancer, etc). It's not "you have it or you don't". You can have varying degrees of it, maybe even a slight case that could be passed off as laziness by most people. So thats why I don't think there's an answer for "what made you sure you had add?" because people automatically assume they have ADD if they can't focus or are getting bad grades. And maybe they do have a slight case of it. The thing is, the treatment will still help them. Adderall helps people with ADD, but it could also help people that can already focus focus even better. I think most people have a slight case of ADD. The symptoms are intensified in some by their personality, motivation, or actual brain chemistry.
Actually, you do have it, or you don't.

Just because it is a spectrum disorder doesn't mean that everyone has it.

I know that I have ADHD because I got a legitimate diagnosis from a qualified clinician, who was able to identify several ways in which my ADHD symptoms had a severe impact on my life in many different areas.

If my only problem was that I had trouble concentrating in school and had poor marks, then I wouldn't have needed a diagnosis and medication.

I think that you need to do more research into what ADHD is exactly, because you don't seem to be aware of the basic facts about the disorder.

Tylerlee17
04-17-12, 11:43 PM
Actually, you do have it, or you don't.

Just because it is a spectrum disorder doesn't mean that everyone has it.

I know that I have ADHD because I got a legitimate diagnosis from a qualified clinician, who was able to identify several ways in which my ADHD symptoms had a severe impact on my life in many different areas.

If my only problem was that I had trouble concentrating in school and had poor marks, then I wouldn't have needed a diagnosis and medication.

I think that you need to do more research into what ADHD is exactly, because you don't seem to be aware of the basic facts about the disorder.

****! You mean me forgetting where I put my keys doesn't mean I have ADHD? Crap.

Drewbacca
04-18-12, 03:15 AM
Hmm... People are just listing symptoms. Not being able to concentrate = 100% certainty that you have ADD? It's confusing, but I think the question is flawed, because ADD isn't like a normal disease (AIDS, Cancer, etc). It's not "you have it or you don't". You can have varying degrees of it, maybe even a slight case that could be passed off as laziness by most people. So thats why I don't think there's an answer for "what made you sure you had add?" because people automatically assume they have ADD if they can't focus or are getting bad grades. And maybe they do have a slight case of it. The thing is, the treatment will still help them. Adderall helps people with ADD, but it could also help people that can already focus focus even better. I think most people have a slight case of ADD. The symptoms are intensified in some by their personality, motivation, or actual brain chemistry.

I see where you are going, but you are wrong on a few points:

First, there is no such thing as a "normal disease." I think what you mean to say is that it isn't a potentially lethal disease. Disease can imply a virus, a mutation, a psychosomatic condition, a sensory problem, a fungus, an auto-immune issue, bacteria, allergies, dietary issues, etc. Any one of those can be lethal if the right conditions are met and not a single one is more legitimate than the rest. What matters is how the disease affects a person, not the origin of the disease.

You don't have a "slight case" of ADHD. You may have attentiveness problems or any other of the common ADHD symtoms. Misdiagnosis is a real concern, because a qualified doctor will always aim to treat the root of the symptoms and not the symptom itself. What you mean to say is that everyone has varying levels of attention/inattention or any other symptom that you want to consider, for that matter. By simply treating someone for ADHD, because it might work, you could end up killing the person by failing to recognize a cancer or auto-immune issue until it's too late.

It's not an issue of intensity of ADHD. There is a distinct difference as clear as night and day. Yes, there is a grey area between the two that some people fall within but generally, if you have the disability, it is a disability.
I had a hard time with memorization and attention in highschool and when I first started college but that isn't what drove me to seek medical help.
Frequent and chronic depression that was caused by underlying ADHD, suicidal thoughts, failing out of college twice (almost a third time, and despite being smarter and better educated than a good number of students with better grades), IBS due to anxiety caused by ADHD, a failed marriage... those are my motivations for seeking help. It's not that I ever reached a conclusion that I have ADHD, but rather, I got to a point where I could no longer ignore it and write it off.

choco222
04-18-12, 05:53 AM
Growing up I was very difficult. Even though my parents are health nuts and I was always outside running around, I couldn't sit still and was very fidgety. I'm almost 19 now (diagnosed about a year ago). What really made start thinking about it is that I could never focus no matter how hard I tried. I would try and try and fail at things. My mom said she thought I might have it or be borderline but she didn't want me on medicine so she never got me diagnosed.

Also I'm 95% sure my dad has undiagnosed ADHD. He fits the bill even better than I do. He has almost every single symptom and to more of an extreme than I do.

Amtram
04-18-12, 11:16 AM
As a spectrum disorder, it means that some people will be mildly disordered, and some will be severely disordered, and lots of people will be spread out in between. If you look at the list of symptoms, it's clear that if you have enough of them to qualify for a diagnosis, you have a disorder that's causing you functional difficulty in all or most areas of your life. Even if you're mildly disordered, you need to do things differently from the way everyone else does to compensate - you might not need medications, but you're going to have to modify your behavior and learn coping strategies that compensate for the difficulties ADD causes in your life.

If your symptoms are so mild that they don't need to be addressed at all, well, you don't have a disorder!