View Full Version : Nightmares linked with adhd? Anyone else get them Frequently


Ihopeyoudont2k
04-04-12, 05:00 PM
I read somewhere that Night terrors where linked to adhd.
Did anyone else have recurring nightmares every night as a child.
I stop getting them when i was say 12 or so, I hardly have them now but still get the odd one.

I remember every night I would go into my parents bedroom. for about 8 years.
It quite sad as I look back. I remember some of the stuff was way to frightening for my age.

Im not diagnosed but have every other typical symptom of adhd.

Fuzzy12
04-04-12, 06:32 PM
I used to get very bad nightmares. Still do though it's better now. I'm not sure they can be classed as night terrors though. I can imagine that with the ADHD mind being all over the place our dreams are messy and twisted as well. It would be interesting to hear if anyone's nightmares have reduced after starting medication. I could be wrong but I think some stimulants actually increase nightmares.

TheChemicals
04-04-12, 07:19 PM
I used to have recurring nightmares but i dont think it was linked to my adhd.

For the last 2-3 years i cant remember my dreams anymore.

spunkysmum
04-04-12, 07:36 PM
I don't have nightmares TOO often, but I do occasionally experience a weird phenomenon where I will get dream flashbacks during the day from recurring dreams, they are just made up of impressions and I can't put my finger on what's happening or make sense of any of it, I only know in the moment that I've been there before, that the dreams are ones I have on a regular basis without making conscious note of it, and when the full flashback episode hits, leaving me dazed, short of breath and disoriented, I generally realize that I have been going about my day half-living in the dream without noticing it. I've never been able to really find out what this is and have a hard time explaining it to anybody.

fracturedstory
04-04-12, 07:51 PM
Lately i was having bad nightmares and I concluded that it may have been due to the sugar/ junk food I was consuming at night or the fact that I upped my dosage and then dropped it again. When I do that I get seriously vivid chaotic time traveller-like dreams.

Conman
04-04-12, 07:53 PM
i recall maybe one bad dream (which for all intents and purposes can be called a "Nightmare" since it woke me up).

i dont remember dreams too much, probably related to times i fall asleep (variable considering my body falls asleep about 1-2 hours after lights out), and when i wake up (variable to alarm or not).

the dreams i do remember, are 1 of 3 types:
A) my standard surreal stuff dreams where it's like a Salvador Dali movie on drugs, X-rated films of the dream world
2) a good dream that i feel brought some degree of happiness or release of emotion possibly. or just a good dream for pleasure.
D) not a nightmare, but a dream that disturbs me. ive only had about 2 of these in my life. i suppose 1 is only disturbing to me, but the other is undoubtedly disturbing and can be called 'a dark erotica'

CheekyMonkey
04-04-12, 08:46 PM
I have frequent and vivid nightmares. I typically don't remember good dreams either.

plank80
04-04-12, 09:27 PM
I had night terrors when I was really young I used to wake up in the middle of the night and run around screaming. Doing that is one of my first memories I still recall it clearly.

Conman
04-04-12, 10:07 PM
OOH! i've sleepwalked a couple of times. all of which involved me doing weird things.

CheekyMonkey
04-04-12, 10:09 PM
Oh yeah, I was a major sleepwalke/sleeprunner up until adulthood.

TheChemicals
04-04-12, 10:26 PM
Im so going to have a bad dream tonight because of this thread.

Conman
04-04-12, 11:10 PM
i started sleepwalking when i was about 13 or 14. i think it was summer before i started highschool...and i was starting marching band. probably an acute stress reaction haha. seriously i still sleepwalk, albeit maybe once or 2wice a year, dont know the cause, but hey, who does?

flycatcher
04-04-12, 11:37 PM
I rarely get nightmares. My dreams are just otherwise twisted and all over the place, and they amuse me to no end. But I recall my parents telling me quite often that they had woken up because of me yelling in my sleep. When I was a kid that is.

The only time I would say I've had "a night terror" was sleep paralysis. Normal nightmares are nothing compared to that stuff.

svenbritt
04-06-12, 11:47 AM
Are you saying that the ADD population have more nightmares then others?

Iīve had so many nightmares from childhood and forward that somewhere along the line i had to take controll of them.
Suppose i learned some kind of lucid dreaming out of pure survival :)

That gift is gone since long now but it sure was cool when it happened. I have a light version now where i realize itīs just a dream but without the editing skills i had back in the days.

When i was young i allways could tell if was about to have one of those really bad dreams buy a sort of sound in my head. Like a pulsating sound...ohhh it was pure terror i remember.

Conman
04-06-12, 01:07 PM
actually in my first instance of sleepwalking, i ate the nachos from Burrito Station from our fridge at the table and woke up and everything was there with fridge open. 2nd time i didnt even hear about till last summer, but in 2010 my roommates for rose parade told me that one night i put one them's clothes in the bathroom, and they started locking the bathroom at night before we slept because of that.

Fuzzy12
04-06-12, 01:15 PM
I rarely get nightmares. My dreams are just otherwise twisted and all over the place, and they amuse me to no end. But I recall my parents telling me quite often that they had woken up because of me yelling in my sleep. When I was a kid that is.

The only time I would say I've had "a night terror" was sleep paralysis. Normal nightmares are nothing compared to that stuff.

I regularly get sleep paralysis too. Often my nightmares end with sleep paralysis. Uggh. It was much, much worse as a kid though.

I thought knowing what it is would make it less scary, but no, I still panic each and every time.

Nifferka
04-06-12, 01:49 PM
I regularly get sleep paralysis too. Often my nightmares end with sleep paralysis. Uggh. It was much, much worse as a kid though.

I thought knowing what it is would make it less scary, but no, I still panic each and every time.

I hyperventilate to wake up. I learned to do this when I was in university--I can control my breathing, if nothing else. The first time I had an episode of sleep paralysis when my husband was around, he tried waking me up gently. I told him afterwards to just shake me awake violently, to get me out of it as fast as possible. Eventually, hyperventilating will wake me up, but it's faster if someone else is there to help.


Most of my nightmares have been related to sleep paralysis.

Fuzzy12
04-06-12, 02:03 PM
I hyperventilate to wake up. I learned to do this when I was in university--I can control my breathing, if nothing else. The first time I had an episode of sleep paralysis when my husband was around, he tried waking me up gently. I told him afterwards to just shake me awake violently, to get me out of it as fast as possible. Eventually, hyperventilating will wake me up, but it's faster if someone else is there to help.


Most of my nightmares have been related to sleep paralysis.

Thanks Nifferka, I'll try that. My husband wakes me too when he hears me making muffled sounds or when I start moving about. I normally start with just trying to wiggle my toes or fingers but sooner or later I invariably panic and try to jerk myself out of it, which does work but only after some time. Too long a time. I've never tried to control my breathing. I'll try that the next time (if I can remember). Thanks :)

Rockabee16
07-08-12, 03:10 PM
As a child I had VERY messed up and vivid dreams almost every night. Most of them were nightmares too (if they weren't nightmares or scary dreams, then they'd still be very bizarre); I don't think I can recall one dream from my childhood that turned out to be good or pleasant in the end, even if they started out that way (for example, I never had any euphoric or awesome dreams like visiting candyland or something). But in these dreams/nightmares, I always had a high level of self-awareness, a quality that I've sometimes thought of as rather odd for a person with ADHD. In other words, I could always tell I was dreaming, whether an odd/impossible or a normal/ordinary event was taking place at a particular moment. So when it came to my childhood dreams, I guess you could say I was like a dog (with it's "sixth sense") in that way; even when something normal was happening for just a moment, I could "sense" that something was wrong in the atmosphere, a feeling which let me know I was dreaming.
However, once I started taking Vyvanse (the first and only ADHD drug I had ever taken) at age 13 (which was three and a half years ago), I stopped dreaming as often, and whatever dreams I did have occasionally weren't as vivid as they used to be. Not only this, but the frequency of my dreams being bad or nightmarish ones decreased significantly; I actually began having a few good or pleasurable dreams while I was on the Vyvanse (dreams which I had NEVER known being off the Vyvanse). On Vyvanse, I still have somewhat vivid and nightmarish dreams, but only every once in a while (like every month or couple months).
To directly and concisely answer your question, I believe frequent nightmares are based on ADHD, because for me, they only started disappearing from my sleep once I started taking the Vyvanse.

MrJohn
07-08-12, 03:47 PM
Had occasional ones but not regular.
Dreams seem to be very vivid lately but not neccesarily bad.

Rockabee16
07-08-12, 04:01 PM
As a child I had VERY messed up and vivid dreams almost every night. Most of them were nightmares too (if they weren't nightmares or scary dreams, then they'd still be very bizarre); I don't think I can recall one dream from my childhood that turned out to be good or pleasant in the end, even if they started out that way (for example, I never had any euphoric or awesome dreams like visiting candyland or something). But in these dreams/nightmares, I always had a high level of self-awareness, a quality that I've sometimes thought of as rather odd for a person with ADHD. In other words, I could always tell I was dreaming, whether an odd/impossible or a normal/ordinary event was taking place at a particular moment. So when it came to my childhood dreams, I guess you could say I was like a dog (with it's "sixth sense") in that way; even when something normal was happening for just a moment, I could "sense" that something was wrong in the atmosphere, a feeling which let me know I was dreaming.
However, once I started taking Vyvanse (the first and only ADHD drug I had ever taken) at age 13 (which was three and a half years ago), I stopped dreaming as often, and whatever dreams I did have occasionally weren't as vivid as they used to be. Not only this, but the frequency of my dreams being bad or nightmarish ones decreased significantly; I actually began having a few good or pleasurable dreams while I was on the Vyvanse (dreams which I had NEVER known being off the Vyvanse). On Vyvanse, I still have somewhat vivid and nightmarish dreams, but only every once in a while (like every month or couple months).
To directly and concisely answer your question, I believe frequent nightmares are based on ADHD, because for me, they only started disappearing from my sleep once I started taking the Vyvanse.

I also wanted to add some other things to what I already posted.

However, as scary as my dreams were as a child, I don't think they never gave me sleep paralysis (I'm very sorry for anybody here experiencing that). If my dreams became too much for me to handle, I would wake up by closing my eyes as tight as I could and then opening them in my dream, which would actually force my eyes open in real life and wake me up. For me this method worked for almost all my dreams (except for maybe a couple of dreams and that's it). However, I'm not sure if others may find this method effective enough in waking them from their dreams--since it may not provide some with a shocking enough sensation to successfully wake up.

I'm not exactly sure why Vyvanse seemed to make my dreams less intense, bizarre, nightmarish and frequent. Maybe since general ADHD drugs typically make thoughts less "interesting" for some people, these medications may not give whomever takes them as many wild or far-fetched ideas to be expressed through dreams. All I know is that I would highly recommend Vyvanse or a similar med to anybody (not anybody obviously; those with ADHD) whose suffering from intense and frequent nightmares. Of course some people may not have the same experience as me but for others I hope that this helps!

faller
07-08-12, 08:52 PM
I rarely had nightmares as a child but I have them all the time now (I'm 35). Otherwise I have very vivid dreams almost every night. Straterra seems to make them more vivid even.