View Full Version : When is a problem "a problem"?


swashbedazzled
04-12-12, 01:50 AM
Hi everyone,

I am really good at going to the MD. I am also good at telling her about how things are going, even weird complaints about my ears itching, and my feet twitching, and how I hate Adderall because it makes me spacey and fat.

I have mentioned my sleeping issues to her, but I haven't really gotten into it. I think because I have, in the back of my head, the idea that my sleeping issues are my own fault. I have had the same sorts of issues that many others have discussed on this forum. I can't sleep, I sleep at weird times, I can't wake up once I am asleep, I can't establish a normal schedule, etc... This has always affected my life fairly seriously, so at what point does it affect your life enough that it merits talking to your MD? When is it a problem, and not just your own issue? I think I have a circadian rhythm issue, but since those aren't really curable is there any point bringing it up? Should I just try harder to establish a normal sleeping routine? (despite failing for the 10 years I have not lived at home).

CheekyMonkey
04-12-12, 02:49 AM
If it affects your life to the point where it interferes with your everyday ability to do things you need to do, then it is a problem. Even if it is your "own issue" it still needs to be addressed and solved which may mean ruling out physical issues and then moving on to psychological ones. Regardless, not being able to sleep is a problem that should be looked into!

Remember, medical professionals work for YOU. You are the customer and when you come to them with a concern they should listen and help you figure out the best plan.

sarahsweets
04-12-12, 06:20 AM
I finally bit the bullet two years ago and had a sleep study, Best thing I ever did.

Fuzzy12
04-12-12, 03:08 PM
This has always affected my life fairly seriously, so at what point does it affect your life enough that it merits talking to your MD? When is it a problem, and not just your own issue?

If it's affecting your life fairly seriously, then it's a problem. All issues are more or less our own but the job of the medical profession is to deal with our issues (if there is something they can do).

Sleep is pretty important and if you are not getting enough of it (or too much of it) it can really affect not just the quality of your life but also your health. I think, it's worth bringing it up. Even if there's nothing you can do, you won't lose anything by mentioning it. There is always the possibility that something else is causing your sleep issues and that it can be fixed.

swashbedazzled
04-12-12, 06:33 PM
I finally bit the bullet two years ago and had a sleep study, Best thing I ever did.

Can you say something about how it helped? I want a bright light to look forward to. I will look into it with my MD next time I go in. I've talked to people about it a little before, but I don't think any of the docs I have had knew very much about sleep issues since they didn't really ask about it. I guess that led me to think it wasn't much of a medical issue. But I've seen so much more coverage of sleeping issues in the last few years, and I finally have decent health coverage.

Maverick420
04-16-12, 01:00 AM
Good think you are taking care of your sleeping problems. I have sleeping problems for many years and tried every med on the market. My recommendation is to avoid Benzodiazepines and Z-Drugs when possible. They don't help but they make things just worse and then you deal with a complicated withdraw who can highly affect your personal life. For short term use with a co-existing disorder like severe depression or bipolar disorders they have their justification but your problem seems to be more like a long term issue.

Doctors often use sedating antidepressants or low potent antipsychotic to treat long term sleeping problems because they are not addictive but from my own experience and other people I know the withdraw can also be hard and changeling. In the end the problem isn't solved. Staying on meds can result in very long sleeping phases, creating a feeling of sedation and low energy. Also many get fat from the antihistamine effects of this drugs.

As far as I know there are only drugs who improve the circadian rhythm you talked about. The first one is Lithium, used for the treatment of bipolar disorder and depression. The effect comes on a long term basis and is still under investigation.

The other drug I know about is labeled Valdoxan (Agomelatine) which is not available in the US. It works on the Melatonin-H1 and H2 Receptors and blocks activating Serotonin-Receptors. I am currently testing this medication and hope it helps. Reports are not clear, some seem to benefit, others had no use at all.

Maybe there is way to import it from another country to the US. 96 Pills cost about 200 EUR in Germany. One Pill is 25 mg while you can take up to 50 mg.

Also I would evaluate if some kind of depression is behind your sleeping disorders and if there are any life troubling events in your life.

Treating sleeping problems is often complicated and difficult. I would see an expert if the problem lasts and maybe you wanna try some time without Adderall.