View Full Version : What tools, apart from ADHD medicine, have helped you?


FlutteryPixie
05-15-12, 01:45 PM
I'm interested in knowing what kind of tools you've tried that have actually worked, wether they are electronics, kitchen tools, relaxation aids, other types of medication or programmes/lectures?

Sometimes, the weirdest things pop up that actually help, and it's hard to know about them unless you're fortunate enough to stumble upon them. In my case, I used to work as a receptionist/secretary/archivist/exam coordinator at an upper secondary school where they built a sensory room, and I was given the task of ordering the various items they were using. The one that was the hardest to find and order was the ball blanket. Thus, I had to do a bit of research and discovered that these strange duvets have proven to be effective for people with ADHD and dyspraxia.

When I got diagnosed with ADHD, I decided to ask the governement for a ball blanket as an aid, and I was granted a test a couple of weeks ago. The ball blanket arrived, and I noted that it was the type with tiny polysterine balls rather than larger, plastic balls. Technically, the plastic balls are more effective for sensory development, clumsiness and hyperactivity, but the lighter, less stimulating polysterine ball blanket does have some of the same qualities.

The first time I pulled it over me, it felt like a fantastic, fluffy, thick, wonderful duvet. It was heavy, and when I moved my limbs around the little soft beads shifted and created a cocoon around me. I could really feel myself. It was fantastic how I stopped moving around, and as my body calmed down, my breath calmed down. As my breath calmed down, my pulse calmed down, and with my calmer pulse, my thoughts calmed down. They stopped racing and shifting and the chaos cleared a little, as I lay there. It was as if I was suddenly "allowed" to relax, to calm down, take a step back and out of the bubble of chaos that is me.

This clarity of thoughts made my medicine work better for hours afterwards. If I use it for half an hour or so in the daytime, I actually feel my medication working the way I did back when I first started taking it. Instead of falling asleep, it wakes me up and gives me more energy for the rest of the day.

It also makes me fall asleep much much faster. I don't wake up during the night, and best of all, I haven't had nightmares for a while! I usually have nightmares very often, up to several times a week, but I haven't had any since I started using my strange, fancy duvet.

I certainly will try the one that is made for ADHD, but I am worried it will be too much, because I am sensitive to touch. I'm also worried it won't have that fairytale wonderland fancy royal castle feeling this one has. Or the feeling of safety as other people may label it.

Here's a link in case you're interested. It works for me, but I've no idea how many percent of adults with ADHD it works for, I do, however, know my boyfriend finds the duvet way too warm, so it's probably completely useless for quite a few of you... Ball blanket linky (http://www.protac.eu/Default.aspx?ID=37)

Other than the fancy ball blanket, I find my calendar book useful. It's the only organization tool I've managed to keep somewhat track of. Smartphone calendars or notes on the fridge just don't work for me, I stop paying attention or checking it. The calendar book, though, is there, visible and distinct all the time, and thus a lot harder to ignore.

My R2-D2 droid from Hasbro helps me do laundry. It sounds silly, I know, but I litterally went from doing laundry whenever we had nothing left to wear to doing laundry at least twice a week pretty much overnight when I got it as a birthday present. It and my laundry machine have a little "conversation" between them whenever the machine runs, as R2 reacts to the noise and heat signature of the laundry machine while it's running. It's adorable.

Another helpful tool that we use way too seldom is the "five minutes of listening". for five minutes (we set an alarm), my boyfriend gets to talk about whatever it is he feels is important, and I don't get to answer until he's done. Also, I have to focus on what he says, but like I said, it's only for five minutes so it's doable with the help of eye contact, which I also have to keep for the duration. if I drop eye contact, he gets more time. It's really helpful whenever something needs to be done in a specific order or manner, as I suck at following instructions or impulsively just "jump in" and get it done, and it's useful when I've neglected something, not noticed something or whenever there's a problem he needs to talk to me about. With the base from the five minutes, the rest of the conversation flows better as I don't "miss" important points.

How about you?

PookDo
05-15-12, 02:13 PM
Give Lumosity a shot. Ive been doing it for 40 days straight now and I am starting to see how its helping. I'm going to start a workout program this coming weekend. Not a huge one but that Ten Minute Trainer thing I've seen infomercials for. Starting small and progressing works best for me so I'm hoping I by starting with ten minutes a day and work up to stuff like P90X and Insanity.

silivrentoliel
05-15-12, 02:43 PM
I have a task program on my phone that I enter tasks into, as well as set specific times to have it done by. It squeals and flips out if I don't check it off right away... DH often inserts tasks in there for me, or will text me and remind me to put stuff in it. It's not the greatest task program, but I like it ^_^

I'm also a routine person. If I can get into a routine for something, I am good at continuing in that. DH is currently helping me get into a cleaning routine after work- we're starting small, with making sure the dishes are done right after work. Once I get that into my routine, we'll expand on that.

I think some coping tools have a lot to do with the person... to each his own.

spatial thinker
05-15-12, 02:52 PM
I just ordered a Watchminder 3 yesterday. I haven't received it yet but I will let you know how it works for me. I hope I will remember to get back to you anyway.

tortilaman
05-15-12, 07:17 PM
I spend what is probably way too much time figuring out productivity systems or something. I can talk to you at length about the pros and cons of all of them, (GTD, Pomodoro Technique, Kanban etc.) but what I will say is that just having everything written down in one central place so you know what you need to do is a huge help. Also, having that with you wherever you go is key. Also, timers.

meadd823
05-15-12, 07:21 PM
old fashion routine, two old fashion calendars one that lives in my purse the other larger one next to my computer desk one writing instrument.

silivrentoliel
05-15-12, 07:55 PM
old fashion routine, two old fashion calendars one that lives in my purse the other larger one next to my computer desk one writing instrument.

I have calendars EVERYWHERE, lol. I have two in the living room, one in the kitchen, one on my phone, one on my laptop, one in the bedroom, and a mirror I write notes on lol

Flory
05-15-12, 09:47 PM
Self-acceptance and work on self awareness :)

E_Mac09
05-17-12, 12:44 PM
It's not really an object per say, but a hobby. I LOVE voice acting! I have always talked to myself out loud alone, which allowed me to develop a voice acting ability. It's one of the few things that I have yet to grow board of. It's also one of the few productive things I am good at.

greygreygrey
05-17-12, 06:53 PM
I do a lot, if not all, of my work on a computer, so online procrastination was a maaaaajor problem for me. The tool I got that fixed this 99% of the time is an add-on you can get for Firefox called Leechblock, where you put in a list of websites (you can add to it as needed) and specify what time window(s) you want the list blocked for, and on what days. When I was in undergrad, using this probably made a measurable impact on my GPA. And it's totally free. I love it.
The problem some people may have is that it's for Firefox, so you could pretty much just open up another browser if you really wanted to waste time. My solution for this was to delete the other browsers on my computer. So I've pretty much committed myself to Firefox for the sole reason that it has Leechblock.
Hope I don't sound like a shill for the developers-I promise I'm not. It's just a really good program.

pechemignonne
05-17-12, 08:12 PM
StayFocused, a website timer and blocker for Google Chrome (same as Leechblock for Firefox, I guess).

Google calendar, so I can keep everyone informed of my schedule (friends and family).

A dry-erase board, with the weekly schedule, so that I know what I'm doing, and my bf also knows what's going on.

Outlook calendar, at work, so that I remember to take my breaks and so that I remember when my breaks are over.

Knowing as much as possible about ADHD and how it works has been the absolute best tool.

TheChemicals
05-17-12, 09:16 PM
I think that being isolated and solitary prevents alot of emotion backlash and confusion. I do my best work when alone or with a lady-friend.

Flory
05-17-12, 09:34 PM
Also keeping life simple building in time for tomfoolery and mistakes which inevitably happen, martial arts have been a godsend the discipline and structure as well as my competitive urge being satisfied and an oppurtunity to beat the **** out of pads at least 3 times a week is invaluable and helps burn off a lot of my excess energy

PookDo
05-17-12, 09:38 PM
Self-acceptance and work on self awareness :)

That sounds oddly Buddhist something I just started reading about

PookDo
05-17-12, 09:41 PM
Also keeping life simple building in time for tomfoolery and mistakes which inevitably happen, martial arts have been a godsend the discipline and structure as well as my competitive urge being satisfied and an oppurtunity to beat the **** out of pads at least 3 times a week is invaluable and helps burn off a lot of my excess energy


I would love to take Kali or Muay Thai but time and money are an issue at the moment.Oddly the Buddhist book I am reading talks about life being a series of trade offs.

greygreygrey
05-17-12, 10:10 PM
StayFocused, a website timer and blocker for Google Chrome (same as Leechblock for Firefox, I guess).

I had no idea there was a similar extension for Chrome, and I've been wanting to switch to Chrome for a while, but stuck to Firefox for that simple reason. Just downloaded Chrome and StayFocused, and I'm going to try it out tomorrow. Thanks!