View Full Version : Omega-3 question type thingy


silivrentoliel
05-22-12, 09:51 PM
so, I can't take horse pills that they sell for omega-3 and while asking the pharmacist if they made SMALLER pills, and him laughing at me (he's an awesome guy, I guess it struck him as amusing), some random lady came up and told me that a local health food store sold omega-3 oil that was flavored and really wasn't that bad. :eyebrow:

I was intrigued, but not enough to go buy it, til yesterday.

So, I took the first dose today, and I have to say, it wasn't bad! I got the lemon flavor, coz that seemed like the most logical choice... lemon is pretty decent about cancelling out fishy flavors (for me anyway). I didn't take it immediately w/ food like it said, coz if it tasted nasty, I didn't want to ruin lunch (I was too chicken to try it earlier in the day, lol), but ate pretty soon after.

Once I got food in my stomach, and about an hour or so before I took my Ritalin, I felt very calm. I can't really describe it yet, but I definitely felt quieter, calmer, less spazzy like I do most afternoons. Not sure if it was my toes throbbing (which wears me out, pain and I don't get along) or if it really was the fish oil...

What is it supposed to do anyway?

I'm going to be brave and take it tomorrow morning... maybe I won't have the weird crashes between meds like I normally do... that would be nice. I hate the spastic, jerky feeling I get in the afternoons... it's no fun :(

I Love Puppies
06-02-12, 02:06 AM
You can also puncture the gelatin casing with a thumb tack and pour the oil into a cup of juice or something. I do this sort of thing often cause I'm vegan and gelatin capsules are made from nasty, nasty dead animal parts.....Also you can get the DHA from other sources like plants and what not, cause most fish oil is toxic..... DHA is the main type of omega 3 that you want. There are a few different kinds of omega-3 and the others don't do much for add type stuff according to most research data and tests....

TSI DHA can be found for cheap on-line.

Rock on.

Drewbacca
06-02-12, 07:14 PM
Visit this link and watch the posted video. http://health.ucsd.edu/news/releases/Pages/2012-05-15-omega-3-oils-help-at-cellular-level.aspx


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Lunacie
06-02-12, 07:39 PM
You can also puncture the gelatin casing with a thumb tack and pour the oil into a cup of juice or something. I do this sort of thing often cause I'm vegan and gelatin capsules are made from nasty, nasty dead animal parts.....Also you can get the DHA from other sources like plants and what not, cause most fish oil is toxic..... DHA is the main type of omega 3 that you want. There are a few different kinds of omega-3 and the others don't do much for add type stuff according to most research data and tests....

TSI DHA can be found for cheap on-line.

Rock on.

Provide a link to research showing that most sources of fish oil supplement are toxic.

I've read research (not going to find it now) that says that the EPA in fish oil is
readily available for our bodies to use, however the ALA in flax seed oil (or ground
flax seed) has to be converted by our bodies and is much less effecient and effective.
Could be a better choice for a vegetarian, but that's not a concern for me.

I haven't seen any research on the benefits of Omega 3 from flax, but there are
several studies about the benefits of Omega 3 from fish oil. It will be interesting
to see what studies like that may show when they are done.

Lunacie
06-02-12, 07:52 PM
Is the fish oil in Omega 3 supplements toxic?

In the majority of brands, it is not.

Most fish oil supplements are made from fish that have relatively low levels of mercury poisoning. These include salmon, tuna, sardines and herring. Always read your supplements ingredient list, to determine what fish was used to create the supplement. Some brands also use extra distilling and purification processes to remove excess contaminants.

Shark, tilefish, snapfish and king mackerel are predatory fish with longer life spans than most fish -- leading to higher levels of mercury. Avoid both supplements and significant amount of meals containing forms of these fish.


My bottle says the oil was taken from anchovies and sardines. I'm good to go.

Many manufacturers distill and purify fish oil to remove contaminants such as mercury. It is important to look for third-party verification of ingredients and purification, instead of just the maker of the fish oil. A non-profit organization that commonly verifies fish oil's safety and ingredients is the U.S. Pharmacopeia. Look for the label "USP Verified" to ensure your fish oil has been closely examined for safety and contents.

Both quotes are from: http://www.livestrong.com/article/433862-omega-3-fish-oil-mercury-toxicity/

Drewbacca
06-02-12, 11:59 PM
Provide a link to research showing that most sources of fish oil supplement are toxic.


I wasn't going to go there... LOL
Especially after reading "nasty, nasty dead animal parts."

Sandy4957
06-03-12, 12:19 AM
Crudmongers. Just lost my last post.

Ok, starting over. I get my Omega-3s from www.zonediet.com, and they have a liquid Omega-3 that is ok if you keep it in your freezer and down it ICE COLD. It's best with an ICE COLD V-8 chaser...

I can't say that it's a delicacy, but if you need to get a high concentration at the lowest price, it's a great option.

I like the Orange-Chocolate Omega-3 "pudding" packets, don't you? :)

PookDo
06-04-12, 02:38 AM
I refuse to take fish oil for ADHD until someone can provide proof that it actually does any good.Most supplements people purchase are good for nothing more than expensive urin

Lunacie
06-04-12, 08:57 AM
I refuse to take fish oil for ADHD until someone can provide proof that it actually does any good.Most supplements people purchase are good for nothing more than expensive urin

If you do a web search you will find that studies have been done showing that
fish oil is effective for some people. Stimulant meds don't work for everyone,
neither does fish oil. It's all a case of trying things until we find what works.

I'm very lucky that fish oil helps me as I don't have health insurance and I can
buy fish oil very cheaply. I also take a B-complex, Vitamin D3, and Magnesium
to help with ADHD, Fibromyalgia and Migraine Disorder. I can tell the difference
when I'm not taking them. For me the proof is that they work for me.

For you:
http://w3.unisa.edu.au/researcher/issue/2006january/story4.asp
http://www.drweil.com/drw/u/id/QAA400011
http://www.nutritionj.com/content/7/1/8 - lack of fatty acid in children with ADHD
http://www.nutritionj.com/content/6/1/16

PookDo
06-04-12, 11:11 AM
If you do a web search you will find that studies have been done showing that
fish oil is effective for some people. Stimulant meds don't work for everyone,
neither does fish oil. It's all a case of trying things until we find what works.

I'm very lucky that fish oil helps me as I don't have health insurance and I can
buy fish oil very cheaply. I also take a B-complex, Vitamin D3, and Magnesium
to help with ADHD, Fibromyalgia and Migraine Disorder. I can tell the difference
when I'm not taking them. For me the proof is that they work for me.

For you:
http://w3.unisa.edu.au/researcher/issue/2006january/story4.asp
http://www.drweil.com/drw/u/id/QAA400011
http://www.nutritionj.com/content/7/1/8 - lack of fatty acid in children with ADHD
http://www.nutritionj.com/content/6/1/16

I admit I briefly looked over the articles and from what I saw all of them applied to children not adults. I'll take anything Andrew Weil says about as seriously as I would Deepak Chopra which is not at all. Knowing what I do about brain function I know that the brain runs primarily on fat so it would make sense That any kind of essential fatty acid would have a positive effect on brain function. Thats why people on low carb/High fat diets often function better. Prividing of course you are well hydrated as well. Being dehydrated can have a serious impact on brain fuction and alertness levels too as well as getting quality sleep

That being said I do know Omega's have a profound effect on cardiovascular issues. If they didn't my doctor would not have prescribed monster Omega Horse pills for my wife

Nifferka
06-04-12, 11:28 AM
I'm very lucky that fish oil helps me as I don't have health insurance and I can
buy fish oil very cheaply. I also take a B-complex, Vitamin D3, and Magnesium
to help with ADHD, Fibromyalgia and Migraine Disorder. I can tell the difference
when I'm not taking them. For me the proof is that they work for me.

Slightly OT, but which of those help with the migraines? I've just come through two weeks of a migraine nearly every other day, and almost every night. I take extra vitamin D, and Omega-3 when I can get it, but I've not noticed any effects.

hjajck
06-04-12, 11:55 AM
I also take a B-complex, Vitamin D3, and Magnesium to help with ADHD, Fibromyalgia and Migraine Disorder.

You sound just like me, only I have a few more things to add to the list. :mad: I've only been taking Omega 3s for a week or so. Can't tell a difference yet, but no negative reactions, either. I'm glad it works for you! :)

Slightly OT, but which of those help with the migraines? I've just come through two weeks of a migraine nearly every other day, and almost every night. I take extra vitamin D, and Omega-3 when I can get it, but I've not noticed any effects.

All of these are used in treating migraines. Just like everything else, results vary. Magnesium is wonderful for migraines; specifically magnesium oil applied transdermally (on the skin). The absorbtion is better.

Lunacie
06-04-12, 12:03 PM
I admit I briefly looked over the articles and from what I saw all of them applied to children not adults. I'll take anything Andrew Weil says about as seriously as I would Deepak Chopra which is not at all. Knowing what I do about brain function I know that the brain runs primarily on fat so it would make sense That any kind of essential fatty acid would have a positive effect on brain function. Thats why people on low carb/High fat diets often function better. Prividing of course you are well hydrated as well. Being dehydrated can have a serious impact on brain fuction and alertness levels too as well as getting quality sleep

That being said I do know Omega's have a profound effect on cardiovascular issues. If they didn't my doctor would not have prescribed monster Omega Horse pills for my wife

Until the last decade there hadn't been any testing of stimulant meds for
adult ADHD. Doctors had to extrapolate based on research for childhood
ADHD. Since ADHD affects the same parts of the brain in both children and
adults, the meds work for both children and adults. Seems the same thing
would apply to Omega 3 in both children and adults.


Slightly OT, but which of those help with the migraines? I've just come through two weeks of a migraine nearly every other day, and almost every night. I take extra vitamin D, and Omega-3 when I can get it, but I've not noticed any effects.

Still OT - but related to supplements:

From what I've read, Vitamin B2, Magnesium, Butterburr and Feverfew are
all good for prevention of Migraines. Not much help when you're having a
headache though.

I've also had good luck with accupressure treatments to treat daily chronic
Migraines following a broken arm bone near my shoulder. I went twice
weekly for about 8 sessions and the daily headaches were gone. I still get
Migraines when the weather changes or when exposed to scented products,
but they only last a day or two at most.

I've also read that tricyclic antidepressants are helpful for Migraines. I haven't
tried them myself.

PookDo
06-04-12, 12:10 PM
[quote=Lunacie;1312793]Until the last decade there hadn't been any testing of stimulant meds for
adult ADHD. Doctors had to extrapolate based on research for childhood
ADHD. Since ADHD affects the same parts of the brain in both children and
adults, the meds work for both children and adults. Seems the same thing
would apply to Omega 3 in both children and adults.
quote]


True but if I'm right adults have a more developed frontal lobe than children which if I'm correct is the part of the brain that deals with executive function. Then again I could be wrong

Sandy4957
06-04-12, 01:00 PM
The first thing that Dr. Edward Hallowell (so, an MD) told me to do was to get on high-dose fish oil.

I've been interested in fish oil for other reasons, so I've just done it for those reasons.

Silven, there's also a strawberry flavored supplement available for kids. I'm not sure where it would be available in your area, but this is the company:

http://www.nordicnaturals.com/en/Products/Product_Details/514/?ProdID=1615

They're the least nasty-tasting of any that I've had, but I agree that the lemon-flavored ones are ok.

Thing is, though, you'd have to take a lot of softgels to get to the doses recommended for neurological issues.

Lunacie
06-04-12, 01:12 PM
True but if I'm right adults have a more developed frontal lobe than children which if I'm correct is the part of the brain that deals with executive function. Then again I could be wrong

And yet, the same stimulant meds seem to work for both children and adults.



The first thing that Dr. Edward Hallowell (so, an MD) told me to do was to get on high-dose fish oil.

I've been interested in fish oil for other reasons, so I've just done it for those reasons.

Silven, there's also a strawberry flavored supplement available for kids. I'm not sure where it would be available in your area, but this is the company:

http://www.nordicnaturals.com/en/Products/Product_Details/514/?ProdID=1615

They're the least nasty-tasting of any that I've had, but I agree that the lemon-flavored ones are ok.

Thing is, though, you'd have to take a lot of softgels to get to the doses recommended for neurological issues.

I only take two softgels each morning. I think I tried taking 3 for awhile and
didn't notice any difference. Just as with stimulants, some may need a
higher dose while some do fine on a small dose.

silivrentoliel
06-04-12, 01:44 PM
The first thing that Dr. Edward Hallowell (so, an MD) told me to do was to get on high-dose fish oil.

I've been interested in fish oil for other reasons, so I've just done it for those reasons.

Silven, there's also a strawberry flavored supplement available for kids. I'm not sure where it would be available in your area, but this is the company:

http://www.nordicnaturals.com/en/Products/Product_Details/514/?ProdID=1615

They're the least nasty-tasting of any that I've had, but I agree that the lemon-flavored ones are ok.

Thing is, though, you'd have to take a lot of softgels to get to the doses recommended for neurological issues.

That's the brand I use, but the lemon flavor. It's been making me gag lately tho, so I've been sharing w/ my dogs... :doh:whatever, it's good for them too. I'm not sure it's actually doing anything though... I can't tell.

Sandy4957
06-04-12, 01:54 PM
You may be right, Lunacie. I was going off of a couple different doctors' books' recommendations. I can't recall if it's the Hallowell books and I've given all of mine away, but I think that he recommends something like 10,000 mg for ADHD.

Here, Silven, in case you might find this useful. It's a study by several doctors, including Hallowell and Sears, regarding ADHD and Omega-3s. Note that they started the kids off taking very high doses, then tested to see what their blood levels were.

http://www.nutritionj.com/content/6/1/16

I've found that I feel best when I take between 6 and 12 of the large softgels per day (or the equivalent liquid), but that's a lot of fish oil. Above 12 per day and I'll have digestive issues. (Which is a nice way of putting it... :o:umm1:) Below 6 I don't notice any effect.

And it's not like you'll notice something instantly. This is the type of thing that takes a few weeks to "work."

When I first started taking fish oil several years ago, we had an incident that drove home how it affects inflammation. We had 9 cubic yards of topsoil delivered for some work that we were going to do in our yard. It got dumped into our driveway, which slopes a little bit. I specifically arranged that it would be delivered when we were supposed to have a dry stretch, so that we could get it off of the driveway before we had a thunderstorm.

Right after it got delivered, the hubster blew out two disks doing something with his car.

So he was out of commission. Now, I'm reasonably fit, but shoveling, wheelbarrowing, and raking 9 cubic yards of dirt isn't something that I do every day (or ever, really), so I was pretty skeptical about whether I could get all this done. (The hubster was even more skeptical.) But I did it. The hubster was amazed. And we were both convinced that I'd be unable to MOVE the next day, but lo and behold, I was no more sore than I might have been if I'd done a light weight workout.

No one has ever told me that that was due to the fish oil, but it was the ONLY factor that differentiated that incident from any other of a list of situations where I'd have been unable to move the next day, so I try to keep up with the fish oil, though I can't say that I'm always successful. :)

Lunacie
06-04-12, 01:58 PM
Hmm, maybe that's why I didn't see any effect with the brand I bought at Walgreens ...
I wasn't taking enough of it.

When I buy the cheap stuff at Walmart or Dollar Tree, 2 softgels is all I need.

Drewbacca
06-04-12, 02:38 PM
I refuse to take fish oil for ADHD until someone can provide proof that it actually does any good.Most supplements people purchase are good for nothing more than expensive urin

My urine is worth some $$$ to the right buyer. Ha!

Anyways, I do take fish-oil but not for ADHD. Watch the video I posted above, it's legit. We don't have enough omega 3's in our diet because we are over saturated with corn-based omega 6s. Whether or not this is causing problems is questionable, but the fact that the 3s and 6s aren't balanced seems to be an accepted fact.

Then again, some studies have indicated that the only way to absorb the amino acids is with actual food... they state the the pill/liquid supplement isn't very efficient for absorption into the body.

silivrentoliel
06-04-12, 02:54 PM
gah! That's like 6tsp a day! Dunno if I could handle that.

PookDo
06-04-12, 02:58 PM
And yet, the same stimulant meds seem to work for both children and adults.





I only take two softgels each morning. I think I tried taking 3 for awhile and
didn't notice any difference. Just as with stimulants, some may need a
higher dose while some do fine on a small dose.


Then again I have read that that same frontal lobe is not quite developed to it's capacity which could be part of the basis for ADHD in both children and adults. Not arguing with you just in a very science geeky mood today as well as yesterday.

Dizfriz
06-04-12, 03:12 PM
Then again I have read that that same frontal lobe is not quite developed to it's capacity which could be part of the basis for ADHD in both children and adults. Not arguing with you just in a very science geeky mood today as well as yesterday.
The frontal area of the brain is the last to develop, it is not mature until somewhere around age 30 give or take.

There have been some good science based studies on fish oil for ADHD, especially coming from Australia and it does seem to work for some.

I take 3 grams of fish oil daily for cardiovascular purposes and this also has some good research behind it. My doc recommends this.

Is it proven? No, but nothing is science is.

I have not read where it does any harm but someone, somewhere will have a negative reaction so with anything you put into your body, you need to carefully monitor for adverse reactions.

Dizfriz

hjajck
06-04-12, 03:26 PM
The frontal area of the brain is the last to develop, it is not mature until somewhere around age 30 give or take.

This explains the connection between ADHD and brain injury, especially before age 30.

Drewbacca
07-15-12, 03:31 AM
I refuse to take fish oil for ADHD until someone can provide proof that it actually does any good.Most supplements people purchase are good for nothing more than expensive urin

Combined omega 3 and omega 6 Supplementation in Children With Attention-Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) Refractory to Methylphenidate Treatment: A Double-Blind, Placebo-Controlled Study
Journal of Child Neurology. Vol. 27 (6). JUN 2012

Abstract
Children (6-12 years) with attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) being treated with methylphenidate and standard behavior therapy for more than 6 months, whose parents reported no improvement in behavior and academic learning, were randomly assigned to receive supplementation with a combined omega 3 and omega 6 preparation or a placebo. Outcome was measured at 3 and 6 months after treatment using a self-assessment checklist completed by the parents. Statistically significant improvement was found in the treatment group compared with the placebo group (P < .01) in the following measures: restlessness, aggressiveness, completing work, and academic performance. Statistically significant improvement was not found at 3 months of treatment between groups but was evident at 6 months of treatment (P < .05) with inattention, impulsiveness, and cooperation with parents and teachers. Distractibility failed to show improvement. Effect sizes ranged from 0.3 to 1.1 at 3 months and 0.2 to 1.4 at 6 months for individual symptom variables.

Lunacie
07-15-12, 08:19 AM
Combined omega 3 and omega 6 Supplementation in Children With Attention-Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) Refractory to Methylphenidate Treatment: A Double-Blind, Placebo-Controlled Study
Journal of Child Neurology. Vol. 27 (6). JUN 2012

.

Thank you, but can you provide a link please. I'd like to know more about this.

Drewbacca
07-15-12, 01:36 PM
Only the abstract is available, which is why I didn't bother with the link.
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22596014