View Full Version : The Importance of Balancing Logical and Intuitive Knowledge


Unmanagable
05-28-12, 02:48 PM
Feel free to omit the word "heavens" if it's a bit too "sunshiney" and "rainbowy" for ya'. :lol:

I wanted to share because I feel like it does a great job at expressing how I feel regarding the importance and significance of both.


"Today the heavens urge us to find a balance between ‘logical’ and ‘intuitive’ knowledge. Sometimes we don’t pay enough attention to how we know something, or to the manner in which knowing arises in us. As a result, when we need to know something we may go the wrong way about gathering the knowledge we need.

If a decision is called for, we may look outside of ourselves for all kinds of facts and data to help us make it, when what we need to do is look within and see which option ‘feels’ right. Alternatively, we may just know, instinctively, the direction we need to move in, but that instinctive or intuitive knowing isn’t enough, and we need to balance it with some cold, hard, practical facts!

There’s often a tendency to elevate one type of knowing above another, and huge divisions grow between those who favour one approach and those who favour the other. But right now the heavens are telling us they both have their place, and we need to get comfortable with that.

Intuitive and instinctive knowing is just as valuable as logical and rational deduction, and vice versa. And both have their place as we follow our own personal paths through life."

~Sarah Varcas

Lunacie
05-28-12, 03:43 PM
Thank you. I've always felt and said there should be a balance in all things.
Few things annoy me more than someone who sneers at emotions and intuition
and celebrates only logical thinking.

salleh
05-28-12, 05:54 PM
to me it's always all about balance ......not easy to find sometimes, but essential ......

sarek
05-29-12, 02:30 AM
For me finding the balance between logic and emotion is one of the primary goals that I wish to accomplish in my lifetime.
They are like yin and yang and figuring out how to make them cooperate and amplify each other gives great rewards.

spunkysmum
05-29-12, 03:27 AM
The problem with the common view of intuition vs. logic is that they are thought to be opposite or even mutually exclusive things. I have believed for some time now that this couldn't be farther from the reality.

It is my firm belief that "intuition" is not the opposite or counterweight of "logic."

Intuition IS logic.

I believe that intuition is a logical process that occurs so quickly and/or subconsciously that we are not able to identify the steps that our minds take on the way to arriving at the conclusion our gut is transmitting to us. At least, we can't identify the process as it is happening. It may be possible to later put our finger on how and why we concluded what we concluded, but while it's happening, we can't see the process.

If you've ever watched the TV game show "Who Wants To Be A Millionaire" where a question is asked and four possible answers appear on the screen for the contestant to choose from, you've probably heard a contestant say that their "gut" was telling them it was Answer B, then a couple minutes later they will talk through out loud the reasons they are leaning towards this answer. It's their intuition that's telling them what answer to choose - and it's an intellectual process, a situation that has very little to do with emotion. So really, the common idea that intuition is synonymous with emotion is faulty. Intuition is based at least as much on logic as it is on emotion - if not more. I guess the misconception comes from the fact that we describe our intuition as "having a feeling" and feeling is often equated with emotion.

I always come out as "balance-brained" on every quiz or evaluation that purports to tell you whether you are right- or left-brained, so this is a topic that's of great interest to me. I'm both extremely logical and extremely intuitive, and I find nothing contradictory or really even paradoxical about these two facts.

spunkysmum
05-29-12, 03:31 AM
For me finding the balance between logic and emotion is one of the primary goals that I wish to accomplish in my lifetime.
They are like yin and yang and figuring out how to make them cooperate and amplify each other gives great rewards.

Logic and emotion can be like yin and yang, I agree. I don't think that logic and intuition are yin and yang, however, because I believe intuition is logic.

sarahsweets
05-29-12, 06:39 AM
This is a great thread. Far to often those who employ intuition o even emotions are dismissed as illogical or irrational. I get really sick of this stereotype.

sarek
05-29-12, 07:15 AM
The problem with the common view of intuition vs. logic is that they are thought to be opposite or even mutually exclusive things. I have believed for some time now that this couldn't be farther from the reality.

It is my firm belief that "intuition" is not the opposite or counterweight of "logic."

Intuition IS logic.

I believe that intuition is a logical process that occurs so quickly and/or subconsciously that we are not able to identify the steps that our minds take on the way to arriving at the conclusion our gut is transmitting to us. At least, we can't identify the process as it is happening. It may be possible to later put our finger on how and why we concluded what we concluded, but while it's happening, we can't see the process.

If you've ever watched the TV game show "Who Wants To Be A Millionaire" where a question is asked and four possible answers appear on the screen for the contestant to choose from, you've probably heard a contestant say that their "gut" was telling them it was Answer B, then a couple minutes later they will talk through out loud the reasons they are leaning towards this answer. It's their intuition that's telling them what answer to choose - and it's an intellectual process, a situation that has very little to do with emotion. So really, the common idea that intuition is synonymous with emotion is faulty. Intuition is based at least as much on logic as it is on emotion - if not more. I guess the misconception comes from the fact that we describe our intuition as "having a feeling" and feeling is often equated with emotion.

I always come out as "balance-brained" on every quiz or evaluation that purports to tell you whether you are right- or left-brained, so this is a topic that's of great interest to me. I'm both extremely logical and extremely intuitive, and I find nothing contradictory or really even paradoxical about these two facts.

Yes yes yes! You nailed it precisely. I sometimes feel that intuition could almost be seen as an emerging property of advanced logic. Just like life can be seen as an emergent property of chemical processes or intelligence as an emergent property of the interactions within the brain.

spc123
05-29-12, 07:26 AM
I have found that intuitive knowledge is sometimes backed up by empirical evidence, but sometimes it's not. I am fine with intuition as long as it's rational. That said, emotion is not always rational. One of the most important things I have learned in my life about relationships and dealing with others is that you can't use logic to deal with someones emotions. Often times when someone is behaving based on emotion, they already know they aren't acting logically; they don't need me to tell them. What they need is empathy and understanding. Of course this has to be balanced by the need to protect friends and loved ones from making poor, potentially harmful decision, based solely on emotion. For example if a friend is angry with their boss, I try to be understanding and supportive. If they tell me they are going to quit a job they otherwise enjoy, and burn bridges in their career, it might be time to present them with some logical perspective.

Bluerose
05-29-12, 12:29 PM
I am a very intuitive person. Logic is something I choose to incorporate whenever I can. Balance is difficult to define. Some things can’t be explained through logic. Intuitive minds can cope with what logic fails to decipher.

spunkysmum
05-29-12, 03:36 PM
This is a great thread. Far to often those who employ intuition o even emotions are dismissed as illogical or irrational. I get really sick of this stereotype.

Ironically, it's the people who are dismissive of this who often employ "shallow logic", and whose idea of what's "logical" is often not even based on a reasoning process they have worked through themselves, but is instead based on "that's how it's always been done" or "that's how everybody else does it."

spunkysmum
05-29-12, 04:03 PM
Yes yes yes! You nailed it precisely. I sometimes feel that intuition could almost be seen as an emerging property of advanced logic. Just like life can be seen as an emergent property of chemical processes or intelligence as an emergent property of the interactions within the brain.

Oh, phew! I'm relieved that my meaning somehow came through in my half-awake ramblings when I wrote this last night. LOL.

I do think that intuition often is not only a process of logic, but one of higher and purer logic that escapes even our ability to explain it. It's probably not exactly the same thing as instinct, but definitely it's related, and we know that instinct has to be more about logic than emotion because instinct is what drives animals and animal behaviour for the most part is not emotionally driven. There is a logical explanation for everything they do, even if the logic doesn't exactly fit the reality of the current situation (like the way some cats will paw around a half-eaten bowl of food as though they are trying to bury it, a behavior which most likely harkens to a life in the wild, wherein a cat who isn't hungry enough to finish an entire "kill" would try to hide the food so that he could find it later but that other animals wouldn't come upon it and finish it off before he could. It doesn't really make sense to paw futilely at linoleum, but the reason behind it does make a kind of sense.)

sarek
05-29-12, 04:22 PM
I think that instinct, while being logically explicable, does not necessarily need to be a product of logic. I am not sure that it can not be that, just that it does not always need to be.

I see intuition as something that rather transcends instinct in that it enables the intuitive mind to venture out into previously uncharted territory, something that instinct does not do.

spunkysmum
05-29-12, 05:01 PM
I think that instinct, while being logically explicable, does not necessarily need to be a product of logic. I am not sure that it can not be that, just that it does not always need to be.

I see intuition as something that rather transcends instinct in that it enables the intuitive mind to venture out into previously uncharted territory, something that instinct does not do.

I agree. Instinct is, almost by definition, basic. Intuition is more sophisticated. What they have in common is that they both often get lumped together on the opposite side of logic, as though folks who act on either of them are not letting their brain rule their actions, but something less reliable.

For the past few years, my long-term and oft-renewed goal has been to learn to trust my intuition more, because invariably most of the regrets I have about choices I've made are the ones in which I second-guessed my intuition and ended up doing the wrong thing. It's frustrating to have ADHD and to forget what I know to be true and important too often because of it. But I remember the magical things and life-changing wonders that started to happen when I decided to start trusting my gut a few years ago, when I began to realize and acknowledge the hidden talents and unrecognized natural skills I have been overlooking all my life. There IS something to the theory that if you believe you can do something, you can (if you have already had a fleeting suspicion that you could, anyway, LOL. Most people have had suspicions that they would be good at certain things, and just haven't followed them up, and if they do follow them up, they generally find they were right.)

Ipsofacto
06-23-12, 11:49 PM
My guess is that ADDers may be unique in terms of intuition. As mostly conceptual learners, our brains are wired to deduce an outcome from less obvious, but related concepts. It's why we tend to be the ideas people in any situation, and maybe why we might rely on intuition more than others. To us the intuitive solution would seem logical, though others may fail to follow the logic; they being unable to connect the same dots.

While this can be a great boon, I can also see the pitfalls.