View Full Version : Living with ADD and dyslexia


Dmitri
06-11-12, 10:00 PM
Hey guys, new poster here,
I was just wondering if anyone else here lives with ADHD and Dyslexia, and maybe we could discuss our experiences.
I got diagnosed with ADHD-PI and dyslexia around the same time, and I'm now precribed to 40 mgs of vyvance. Now there's not much that can be done with dyslexia medication-wise, but I notice that vyvance, although meant to help my ADD, really helps because words process faster as I read them and like I don't get confused as much while reading (it's hard to really describe how I feel with a non-dyslexic which is why I'm hoping more fellow dyslexics come). Also on Vyvance I'm more motivated to get past my dyslexia and try harder to process words.
Anyone else have a similar experience?

Lillianmay
06-12-12, 01:03 PM
I am also newly diagnosed dyslexic and ADHD- PI. My medication is a little on the low side because I am a little underweight. I take one Adderall XR 30mg a day which only gives me about 8 hours of coverage. 30mg works well, but a lot of my day is not covered. I took Vyvanse for a bit, but couldn’t eat. I am not feeling too much of a difference, but my family says there is.

All my life I have not been really sure what people were saying to me and I could not come up with conversation fast enough. So, I was the quiet one who never said anything. I am still struggling with that, but I guess I can’t fix 22 years of not really hearing people in a few months. I may have a language disorder too. I will be tested for that next month. The hardest things for me right now are my difficulties with conversation, time blindness, and getting motivated to learn those things in my life that I need to cope.

I saw the BBC documentary “Kara Tointon: Don’t Call Me Stupid” (it is on YouTube) and I had so many of the same problems that I got tested for dyslexia and they also thought I had ADHD-PI. Towards the end of the documentary, Kara says making the changes she needed to make were like breaking an addiction, that was how hard it was to do things differently. I find this true for me.

I do not know why it is so hard to do things that will make my life better – use alarms, schedules etc. I guess I have been escaping to my daydreams so long that it is hard to wake up to real life, or maybe I think a miracle will happen and one day I will wake up, have fascinating conversations, and know what time it is and where I put my phone:)

Dmitri
06-12-12, 03:13 PM
I am also newly diagnosed dyslexic and ADHD- PI. My medication is a little on the low side because I am a little underweight. I take one Adderall XR 30mg a day which only gives me about 8 hours of coverage. 30mg works well, but a lot of my day is not covered. I took Vyvanse for a bit, but couldn’t eat. I am not feeling too much of a difference, but my family says there is.

All my life I have not been really sure what people were saying to me and I could not come up with conversation fast enough. So, I was the quiet one who never said anything. I am still struggling with that, but I guess I can’t fix 22 years of not really hearing people in a few months. I may have a language disorder too. I will be tested for that next month. The hardest things for me right now are my difficulties with conversation, time blindness, and getting motivated to learn those things in my life that I need to cope.

I saw the BBC documentary “Kara Tointon: Don’t Call Me Stupid” (it is on YouTube) and I had so many of the same problems that I got tested for dyslexia and they also thought I had ADHD-PI. Towards the end of the documentary, Kara says making the changes she needed to make were like breaking an addiction, that was how hard it was to do things differently. I find this true for me.

I do not know why it is so hard to do things that will make my life better – use alarms, schedules etc. I guess I have been escaping to my daydreams so long that it is hard to wake up to real life, or maybe I think a miracle will happen and one day I will wake up, have fascinating conversations, and know what time it is and where I put my phone:)

This is a great story, I've had a lot of the same problems at you but I'm only 16 so it only affected me up until mid-sophomore year of high school- through that period I was frustrated, depressed, and suicidal; I can't imagine what it would be like to go 22 years undiagnosed. See, this is why I never complain, no matter what I'm going through someone always has it worse.

As for the appetite thing, you'll find that with every ADD medication, you just gotta get used to eating without an appetite. I took in like 700 calories a day on my first prescription (Concerta) but I got used to it and eventually I could eat just fine. For reasons other than appetite I switched to Vyvance and since I was so used to eating on Concerta, I had no problems eating on Vyvance, despite having no appetite.

ADHD medications are all about personal preferrence, some medicines work perfectly for some, and suck for others. But if you liked Vyvance and only switched because of appetite, I'd recommend going back

Dmitri
06-12-12, 03:29 PM
Also, I too have a social anxiety disorder coming from years of being bullied ("nerd, retard, loser, you're lazy, grow up") made worse by the ADD and I think this is probably my biggest personality flaw. No S.A.D. medications really help me; SSRIs do nothing and I despise benziodiazepams. However, since I really want to be social and get over my social phobia, Vyvance gives me the motivation to get past my S.A.D.- I am now slowly becoming more and more comfortable with social interaction. Well I don't go around saying WASSAAAAP to random people, but if someone were to approach me with a familiar subject usually I can hold a conversation.

I wish you the best of luck getting past your problems

MX2012
06-12-12, 03:34 PM
Dimitri, I went undiagnosed for years for both ADD/HD and dyslexia.

Originally, after getting diagnosed, I was given generic ritalin. I used it for a short while. I was so used to living with ADD/HD, I did not like the silence that ritalin caused in my brain. But, I did take away the realization that "normal" people do not have alot of competing thoughts in their head.

My dyslexia is mild but troublesome. Looking at numbers makes me car sick. I flip numbers. I flip letters. I also have aural dyslexia, meaning I can hear what people say but often I will flip the words in their sentences or drop words, so I think I know what they said but if I repeat it back, I find out what I lost. Very important for me to confirm what I have heard.

The letters that give me the most trouble are bdp&g. When they are in a word, mentally my eyes cross and I have to pick the word apart or trace the letters to make sure I know what word it is.

Others here on the forum have more knowledge and experience with medications.

Welcome and good luck.

jiffyPOP
06-12-12, 03:54 PM
I am diagnosed dyslexia and ADHD. I am a very slow reader and had speech impediments as a child. It is near impossible for me to learn foreign language because of my type of dyslexia.

I took a series of dyslexia tests with my Neuro-Psyc specialist. It was surprising and quite frankly, embarrassing! I was shocked.

I tested in the 2nd percentile on one of the dyslexia test :o . 98% of people are better at it than me :eek:. In addition, my reading comprehension was rated at the 5th grade level (I am a PhD student so that kind of sucks :eyebrow:).

The tests show that when I get stumped by a word, my ADHD kicks in and I lose focus then I get distracted and lose interest. I use context to understand and have pretty much learned to BS my way through reading. I read the minimum possible (abstract - intro - conclusion). I have never finished a book.

I went to disability services at the university and enrolled in text-to-voice service. They turn all my articles and book chapters into MP3s and I listen to them while driving, hiking, and while trying to follow along to the book itself. I take notes with a special hi-tech pen that also records the professors lecture as audio and then special software later matches my written notes with the audio file. I am also getting counseling.

Dmitri
06-12-12, 04:39 PM
See it's easy for me to read a book out loud- especially when I have an audience, because I work extra hard not to mess up and I make sure I'm reading it right. I don't think that I have ever silently read a book start to finish. That is the one thing I wanna be able to do- to read something without audiobooks, sparknotes, or reading it out loud to my peers. See I'm actually an OK speller, I just have to keep.correcting my words until I know its right. Like, even if I'm commenting on a facebook status, I gotta change every other spelling like three times but eventually I get it. I'm hoping that if I put a ton of effort into it, I can eventually get it right the FIRST time, and THEN I can tackle books.