View Full Version : ADD Coach? Anyone every try this?


entrepreneurKid
07-23-12, 01:32 PM
Hey all.. I think I'll be trying this out, but it's all over skype/phone etc.. The coach lives in another state.

Anyway, anyone ever try this? Helpful? or......?......

sarahsweets
07-23-12, 01:36 PM
A moderator, anonomously ad has had an experience with a coach.

entrepreneurKid
07-23-12, 01:43 PM
Do you know if it was good? or..

spunkysmum
07-23-12, 01:56 PM
Never tried it. I think I did some looking into it once online and when I saw how much it cost, I figured if I had that kind of money to spend on that, it would probably mean my life wasn't going too bad in the first place. LOL

entrepreneurKid
07-23-12, 02:54 PM
Found one that charges 1.67% of your annual income. Let me know if you're interested. He's Christian too btw..

addproud
07-24-12, 11:18 AM
Not only have I tried using an ADD coach, but was very pleased with the results. Now we help coach others with ADD to take control of their ADD and maximize the gifts ADD gives them (like I did)

ADD coaching fees do not have to be high nor based upon a percentage of your annual income, nor expensive.

BTW the person who created life coaching (Thomas Leonard) designed it the help himself take control of his own ADD and enjoy life much more. It worked for him.

JOHNCG
07-25-12, 06:28 AM
Not only have I tried using an ADD coach, but was very pleased with the results. Now we help coach others with ADD to take control of their ADD and maximize the gifts ADD gives them (like I did)

ADD coaching fees do not have to be high nor based upon a percentage of your annual income, nor expensive.

BTW the person who created life coaching (Thomas Leonard) designed it the help himself take control of his own ADD and enjoy life much more. It worked for him.


I have to say that I don't know much about ADHD coaching in itself, but I can only imagine that coaching (like CBT) would only be effective for adults with ADHD who were taking (and responding well to) stimulant ( or 'Strattera", etc;) medication.

angora
07-25-12, 11:58 AM
I have to say that I don't know much about ADHD coaching in itself, but I can only imagine that coaching (like CBT) would only be effective for adults with ADHD who were taking (and responding well to) stimulant ( or 'Strattera", etc;) medication.

You might be interested in this recent study:

http://www.biomedcentral.com/content/pdf/1471-244X-12-30.pdf

A Randomized Controlled Trial of CBT Therapy for Adults with ADHD with and without Medication

Margaret Weiss, Candice Murray, Michael Wasdell, Brian Greenfield, Lauren Giles and Lily Hechtman

Quote:
"This study supports previous findings that adults with ADHD are responsive to CBT intervention. It extends previous research in demonstrating that the impact of CBT can be demonstrated in both response of core symptoms and functioning, whether administered with stimulants or placebo. This is the first randomized, placebo controlled study to demonstrate that where CBT augments the effect of medication, we were not able to demonstrate that medication impacts on the capacity to learn the skills taught in CBT. This suggests that CBT therapy can be effective in adults with ADHD, even in patients who are not able to use stimulants."

anonymouslyadd
07-25-12, 04:55 PM
Hey all.. I think I'll be trying this out, but it's all over skype/phone etc.. The coach lives in another state.

Anyway, anyone ever try this? Helpful? or......?......
Yes, I used a coach in a similar scenario as you. The coach was not in my state, and we conversed over the phone.

She was excellent and a catalyst for changing my life. She was safe and understanding, the first person in my life to be like this. She taught me excellent strategies to cope with ADD. I'm much more organized because of her, and my car is spotless, ever since I worked with her.

I hope that helps you.

ginniebean
07-25-12, 06:01 PM
Where are the studies for the effectiveness of coaching?

anonymouslyadd
07-25-12, 06:13 PM
I don't know of any studies on the efficacy of coaching, but that doesn't eliminate the validity of my experience. Research is important, but I'm not going to wait to get my hands on a published study to try to get help for myself. When I was a newly diagnosed ADDer, I was desperate for help.

I was fortunate though. My coach had ADD and was very understanding. Her understanding what I was going through helped me want to listen to her.

By the way, I don't think coaching ought to looked through that lens alone. My coach was a trained therapist as well as a coach, and she gave me CBT. She taught me how to change negative thoughts, stay away from toxic people and reinforced when I didn't cross personal boundaries.

alan1
07-25-12, 06:33 PM
At the recommendation of my psychiatrist I tried a psychologist who had ADHD themselves. But by that time, I'd already read books by Hallowell, Barkley and Tuckwell and he said he didn't really have anything to add to that. Each of them have easy to read material and give lots of good advice.


"Found one that charges 1.67% of your annual income. Let me know if you're interested. He's Christian too btw.."

I can't imagine going to someone who would charge me based on my annual income. If that is intended to serve as a discount to the needy, they should just say so. Also have no idea why their religion is relevant to the conversation as ADHD crosses all lines.

JOHNCG
07-25-12, 08:12 PM
You might be interested in this recent study:

http://www.biomedcentral.com/content/pdf/1471-244X-12-30.pdf

A Randomized Controlled Trial of CBT Therapy for Adults with ADHD with and without Medication

Margaret Weiss, Candice Murray, Michael Wasdell, Brian Greenfield, Lauren Giles and Lily Hechtman

Quote:
"This study supports previous findings that adults with ADHD are responsive to CBT intervention. It extends previous research in demonstrating that the impact of CBT can be demonstrated in both response of core symptoms and functioning, whether administered with stimulants or placebo. This is the first randomized, placebo controlled study to demonstrate that where CBT augments the effect of medication, we were not able to demonstrate that medication impacts on the capacity to learn the skills taught in CBT. This suggests that CBT therapy can be effective in adults with ADHD, even in patients who are not able to use stimulants."


are unmedicated.

JOHNCG
07-25-12, 08:13 PM
You might be interested in this recent study:

http://www.biomedcentral.com/content/pdf/1471-244X-12-30.pdf

A Randomized Controlled Trial of CBT Therapy for Adults with ADHD with and without Medication

Margaret Weiss, Candice Murray, Michael Wasdell, Brian Greenfield, Lauren Giles and Lily Hechtman

Quote:
"This study supports previous findings that adults with ADHD are responsive to CBT intervention. It extends previous research in demonstrating that the impact of CBT can be demonstrated in both response of core symptoms and functioning, whether administered with stimulants or placebo. This is the first randomized, placebo controlled study to demonstrate that where CBT augments the effect of medication, we were not able to demonstrate that medication impacts on the capacity to learn the skills taught in CBT. This suggests that CBT therapy can be effective in adults with ADHD, even in patients who are not able to use stimulants."



That study and another five of the most recent clinical trials of CBT in adults with ADHD (that showed some promise) are reviewed in a separate chapter of a new scientific reference called: ADHD in ADULTS- Characterization, Diagnosis and Treatment by Jan Buitelaar et al, (2011), Cambridge University Press.

Weiss et al, and one (I think, from memory) other study in the group of six, make the claim that their results demonstrate the efficacy of CBT for adults with ADHD who are unmedicated.

In the chapter above, however, the authors of the CBT review point out a number of serious methodological issues in these two studies, which tend, I think, to take a lot of the "punch" out of their "CBT effective without meds" claims.

As far as the treatment of the symptoms of ADHD - (note: ADHD, not its common Axis - I comorbidities, or the affective/emotional fallout from any other "associated problems" that frequently co-exist with adult ADHD) - is concerned, the majority of the six CBT studies, clearly acknowledge that failure to first remediate the ADHD core symptoms ( of inattention, impulsivity, hyperactivity) and, for example, the symptoms of the disorder that are generated by ADHD-driven Executive Function impairments , through treatment with stimulant drugs ( or, I suppose, "Strattera") will seriously diminish the prospect of any CBT therapy being successful.

Getting back to this new book on ADHD in adults; if you are interested in the science of the topic, then I would say it's well worth your while buying a copy. Published in 2011, it contains a lot of very up to date research and all sorts of other information about a wide range of adult ADHD issues. Its a high quality, legitimate ,science-based document and contains chapters written by top experts like Russell Barkley and Biederman amongst others.

NB: Coaching is an entirely different ball of wax from CBT.

JOHNCG
07-25-12, 08:22 PM
Where are the studies for the effectiveness of coaching?

In the new adult ADHD book I mention in the post I just sent on this thread (immediately above this one)

Regards,

J

ToneTone
07-25-12, 10:39 PM
Two years ago, I found a local ADHD coach. I Couldn't afford her normal rates, but she ended up giving me a HUGE discount and we scheduled half-hour sessions over the phone.

She was enormously helpful. The woman gave me some fantastic ideas and a just ways of thinking about my life and how to make it easier. I'm still putting into practice some of the principles she shared with me.

We met for 8 sessions ... I might go for another 8 rounds in the future. But to answer your question, the coaching was really helpful and eye-opening.

Frankly, I didn't even think twice about the phone calls. She was totally focused when she called me, sent me emails afterwards outlining notes of our talks. She remembered what I said from week to week.

Coaches who understand ADHD are amazing. Now understand, it might take you a little while to start implementing some of the ideas and concepts that come up. But you will ...

The coach pointed out so many legit ways I could make my job easier, by having others do just a little more of the organization of things--I'm still putting this into practice.

Good luck.

Tone

angora
07-26-12, 02:11 AM
Where are the studies for the effectiveness of coaching?

Here's one that discusses it:

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2628311/

It also explains some of the differences between the cbt that is being used for adhd and coaching.

angora
07-26-12, 02:25 AM
That study and another five of the most recent clinical trials of CBT in adults with ADHD (that showed some promise) are reviewed in a separate chapter of a new scientific reference called: ADHD in ADULTS- Characterization, Diagnosis and Treatment by Jan Buitelaar et al, (2011), Cambridge University Press.

Weiss et al, and one (I think, from memory) other study in the group of six, make the claim that their results demonstrate the efficacy of CBT for adults with ADHD who are unmedicated.

That Weiss et al is from 2008. The one I referenced is from 2011 and is a blind study with some medicated and some placebo.

Apologies for continuing to derail your thread entrepeneurKid.:o

tortilaman
07-27-12, 04:35 AM
I did ADHD coaching for a couple months. I did it with a company that was in town and had a few coaches. I didn't go to the head person (who was supposed to be a miracle worker) and wish I would have. Generally ADHD coaches have ADHD themselves, and the one I had didn't really have hers under control to the point where I thought she should be coaching other people. Essentially I was paying for an hour or something plus my travel to her office, and I wasn't getting my entire time's worth of it. My last visit she started to be extremely helpful, but by that time, it was just too expensive.

If I could find a coach who charged a reasonable rate, I would definitely recommend it, but no matter what the rate is, if the person isn't helping, there's no reason to go. I guess my point is try it, and see how you like it. The experience is entirely different depending on who your coach is.

musicman64
08-14-12, 10:14 PM
As a coach and as one that uses a coach, I highly reccommend the experience. When seeking one out, make sure they truly understand ADHD. It will make a great deal of difference in your experience.

CurlyHairedGirl
07-17-13, 03:00 AM
I've been using a coach who has ADHD herself. She's a nice person, and I relate to her, but I don't think that's enough. Partly because of her ADD tendencies, I don't think she has been very helpful. So I'm going to be stopping the coaching after this month, after paying over $1000 for 3 months. And that was *with* a discount based on my life situation. I cashed out some of my investments that were supposed to be for retirement to do this.

I need an environment with lots of structure and reminders, especially visual reminders. My memory sucks and my note taking skills suck, so having a coach that emailed me notes afterwards would help. I also am not sure whether the phone format works for me, since I am a very visual learner and really need to see stuff to absorb it.

The coach gave me a few reminders about things I'd already heard, and when I asked for stress/anxiety/procrastination management tips, pointed me to a book I was planning on buying eventually. I decided that since I absorb things visually, I should just go and buy tons of books on ADHD. Then read and highlight anything that speaks to me. Since I'm buying books on Kindle, they are a little cheaper that way. There are two books that are something like 365 tips from ADHD Coaches, so I figured even though those are some of the pricier books, I'd get a decent number of tips out of them and still cheaper than one visit to the coach.

I wouldn't object to the large amount of money that I paid if I was getting what I hoped for out of it. I don't need gentle probing to unearth the solutions that are within me. I need to say this is my barrier. Then get a response with a list of strategies that come from the coaches experience working with others, stuff they learned in training, etc. Then come up with a structured plan for me to implement one or more of the strategies. After the session, get some sort of reminder/trigger from the coach about what I was planning on doing. At the beginning of the next session, get asked by the coach if I did what I was going to do.

I'm going to be trying some group coaching/classes next and will see if I can learn more at a more reasonable price.

KCBrainRussell
02-12-14, 04:07 PM
I coach kids all the time at a small non-profit here in Kansas City. We have online materials for interested parents. The success I have is almost always tied to the amount of effort both I and my client student and parents put forth. That being said, I do work hard to make sure everything I deliver is what the student needs.

InvitroCanibal
01-09-15, 07:41 AM
I am a peer coach believe it or not, that is my living at the moment. I can try to help anyone via pm if they have any challenges that are going on in regards to their ADHD.

I think a peer coach or adhd coach's job is to give the client accountability through reflection and motivational interviewing. In that, I mean most the work has to be done by the client but, as they say, two heads are better than one.

Having an outsider perspective on your life, that is understanding and non judgmental can help you pull the weeds and identify them, in regards to productivity, organization and motivation. The main job of the ADHD coach is to find what works for the client, as opposed to saying "AHA! SEE YOU ****** THAT UP AGAIN DIDN'T YOU!"

Should based coaching doesn't work.

I don't know any studies off the top of my head but whether or not it works really just depends on you and your thought process going into it. Medications really solve about half the symptoms and i'm not someone against meds but I also don't think they are the entire answer to life's problems.

Anyways i'm not selling anything, and my advice and time are always free here and open to anyone.( I don't have a website or a 10 step program either. )

As always though, take what the stranger behind the computer says with a grain of salt. In that regards I mean, by stating i'm a peer specialist isn't a power play or proof of credentials so all I can offer is just reflection and at the end of the day, friendly advice.

Best of luck to you.