View Full Version : Michael Phelps becomes the most decorated Olympian of all time


anonymouslyadd
08-01-12, 12:27 AM
Michael Phelps, a sufferer with ADD, won his 19th Olympic medal surpassing a 48 year old record, last night.

Phelps took home gold as he anchored team USA in the 4 x 200 meter freestyle event, over France. Last night's medal brought his gold medal total to 15.

Journalism writing ends!

I'm so proud of Phelps and his accomplishment. He must have endured quite a struggle, even with his physical gifts. One teacher said that he would never be able to focus on anything. I wonder how that person feels now.

When I saw him swimming those four laps, I felt like I was winning. It may sound weird, but knowing what it's like to live with ADD, made me feel like I was apart of his victory. I felt like a champion.

People criticized his work ethic over the past four years. They probably don't know what it's like to struggle everyday. He had to work twice as hard as they did in order to accomplish his feats. In the words of SS, they can go **** themselves.

Unmanagable
08-01-12, 12:53 AM
Way to go Phelps!! :yes:

And, he managed to accomplish all of that even though he inhaled. :)

CheekyMonkey
08-01-12, 12:54 AM
I didn't know he has ADD. Interesting!

anonymouslyadd
08-01-12, 01:09 AM
I didn't know he has ADD. Interesting!
This article here (http://www.everydayhealth.com/adhd/living-with-adhd/mylife/debbie_phelps/landing.aspx) talks about it.

namazu
08-01-12, 07:20 PM
Just came across a related article in the UK Guardian: "What can athletes with ADHD teach us about the condition?" (http://www.guardian.co.uk/society/2012/aug/01/athletes-with-adhd)

(I'm not sure the article truly addressed the question posed in the title, but it seemed unusually "grounded" as far as articles on ADHD and famous people go.)

Here's an excerpt:
Athletes like Phelps and McKenzie do not, however, have special powers via their condition. Bilbow believes it is actually significantly harder for people with ADHD to become elite athletes. "Having ADHD doesn't mean you're going to be a great sportsperson," she says. "Your ADHD isn't going to get you there, it's hard work that will. ADHD is not a contributor towards success but equally it is not a barrier to success."

People with ADHD, which is a developmental disorder, may find they have poor problem-solving skills, and struggle with timekeeping, and organising and motivating themselves, explains Bilbow. This may suggest that adapting to the discipline demanded by athletic training is tough for those with ADHD and yet Bilbow believes many with the condition find sport gives them the kind of immediate rewards and sense of achievement they need to build confidence and resilience.

anonymouslyadd
08-03-12, 12:15 AM
He won his 20th Olympic medal, defeating Lochte, yesterday. It was a gold medal. I'm so proud of him.

mildadhd
08-03-12, 01:18 AM
He won his 20th Olympic medal, defeating Lochte, yesterday. It was a gold medal. I'm so proud of him.

Thanks for the thread.

Point of performance = Swimming pool?

(listens to music before he swims)

Excellent example.

anonymouslyadd
08-04-12, 01:42 AM
Phelps won his 21st Olympic medal, last night!!!!! It was another gold.

Fortune
08-04-12, 02:12 AM
Here's an excerpt:Athletes like Phelps and McKenzie do not, however, have special powers via their condition. Bilbow believes it is actually significantly harder for people with ADHD to become elite athletes. "Having ADHD doesn't mean you're going to be a great sportsperson," she says. "Your ADHD isn't going to get you there, it's hard work that will. ADHD is not a contributor towards success but equally it is not a barrier to success."


If it's significantly harder to become elite athletes then ADHD is by all means a barrier. It's just not insurmountable.

namazu
08-04-12, 12:20 PM
If it's significantly harder to become elite athletes then ADHD is by all means a barrier. It's just not insurmountable.
Yeah, I noticed that turn of phrase, too -- you're right. Perhaps that's what Bilbow meant -- it's an obstacle, but it doesn't necessarily bar a person from succeeding.

In any case, I appreciated that the article celebrated the triumphs of these athletes, while not making ADHD out to be some kind of superpower, nor glossing over some of the difficulties ADHD has caused in their lives.

(OK, so it didn't mention Phelps losing a bunch of sponsorships when he was caught smoking pot...but it definitely talks about Ashley McKenzie's rap sheet and suspensions. It also raises the challenging point about ADHD meds being banned substances, which, while understandable from a competition point of view, obviously makes it more difficult for guys like McKenzie to avoid getting themselves into other sorts of trouble even when they're not competing.)

In any case -- hooray, athletes who've worked hard and accomplished things no one thought they could! :yes: (And a send-up to double-amputee Oscar Pistorius for his next-round qualification in the 400m.)

seamstress
08-06-12, 11:43 AM
Lol..this what Michael Phelps said after he won:
"One thing that was crazy before I was warming up today, I said to [coach] Bob [Bowman], the one person I've looked up for so many years is the greatest basketball player to ever live and Bob and I have able to do everything to be where we are today."
From: http://ca.sports.yahoo.com/blogs/olympics-fourth-place-medal/michael-phelps-near-tears-incomprehensible-final-post-race-035004096--oly.html#more-9773

What a great ADD shpeel! Who cares, lol, cause he won!

namazu
08-06-12, 12:02 PM
Sports interviews are funny...


Meanwhile, congrats to Justin Gatlin, sprinter with ADHD (http://bleacherreport.com/articles/1271428-us-olympic-track-team-2012-10-things-you-need-to-know-about-justin-gatlin/page/3), for his bronze medal in the ridiculously fast men's 100m.

(...Hopefully he ran the race clean this time.)

AshT
08-07-12, 07:51 PM
Just came across a related article in the UK Guardian: "What can athletes with ADHD teach us about the condition?" (http://www.guardian.co.uk/society/2012/aug/01/athletes-with-adhd)

(I'm not sure the article truly addressed the question posed in the title, but it seemed unusually "grounded" as far as articles on ADHD and famous people go.)

Here's an excerpt:Athletes like Phelps and McKenzie do not, however, have special powers via their condition. Bilbow believes it is actually significantly harder for people with ADHD to become elite athletes. "Having ADHD doesn't mean you're going to be a great sportsperson," she says. "Your ADHD isn't going to get you there, it's hard work that will. ADHD is not a contributor towards success but equally it is not a barrier to success."

People with ADHD, which is a developmental disorder, may find they have poor problem-solving skills, and struggle with timekeeping, and organising and motivating themselves, explains Bilbow. This may suggest that adapting to the discipline demanded by athletic training is tough for those with ADHD and yet Bilbow believes many with the condition find sport gives them the kind of immediate rewards and sense of achievement they need to build confidence and resilience.

Probably because they spoke to Bilbow - A women who's been running a national ADHD charity in the UK for 20 years helping others with the condition, children, parents, etc and has ADHD herself. :) She knows her stuff!

sighduck
08-08-12, 11:56 AM
Phelps has nothing on le clos :P ... GO SOUTH AFRICA!!!! http://www.paklinks.com/gs/images/smilies/saflag.gif

namazu
08-08-12, 12:29 PM
Phelps has nothing on le clos :P
Does Le Clos have ADHD, too?

I heard in an interview that Le Clos and Phelps are planning to go "diving with sharks" together off the Coast of ZA.

sighduck
08-11-12, 03:10 PM
not that i know of...

havent heard of the diving with sharks thing either (although there is a lot of shark diving done of our east coast) thankfully we getting a better haul in this olympics compared to our last few (beijing was a dismall failure with one solitary silver :( )

ConcertaParent
08-18-12, 04:50 PM
Mom talks about Michael Phelps’ ADHD (http://www.kansascity.com/2012/08/08/3752307/stargazing-mom-talks-about-michael.html)

“We had to keep him structured,” she said of his childhood. “As long as he was on a schedule, he was great. We also used a task chart, where you had to get all these things accomplished before you were able to do other things.
The checklist I made for my daughter this summer (based from the Smart But Scattered book) helped her do brain training, reading and other daily tasks well, so I plan to continue with task charts once school starts.

ana futura
08-18-12, 06:20 PM
Judging by my own experience, I think ADHD definitely has the potential to be an attribute athletically. It's hard to access the positive aspects though, as there's also a lot of crap you have to overcome.

I know that my ADHD gives me my competitive drive. It's also the reason I have no discipline and refuse to stick to a training program. I know my ADHD mind can be a gift at times, but it is so extremely difficult to harness it and access it when I need it. I get glimpses of my potential now and then, and it amazes me. I know if I stuck to a training program I would be a really good cyclist.

There are positives to ADHD that have contributed to Micheal's success, but there are also an overwhelming amount of negatives he's had to work very hard to overcome.

ana futura
08-18-12, 06:30 PM
http://www.usatoday.com/sports/olympics/beijing/swimming/2008-07-31-phelps_N.htm



But for all of the genetic gifts that make him a master at defying drag in the water, for all of the physical advantages that could propel the 23-year-old swimmer in the next month to the best Olympic performance of all time, the key to Phelps' superiority is what is in his mind as he races.

Very little.

"It's either nothing or 'I have to get my hand on the wall before they do,' " says Phelps, who won six gold and two bronze medals in the 2004 Olympics.

His coach says that single-mindedness, that ability to shut out the great expectations and the supercharged Olympic atmosphere, will allow Phelps — who will race up to 20 times in Beijing in pursuit of a record eight gold medals — to climb out of the pool each time with an eye only on what's next.

"That," coach Bob Bowman says, "is his strongest attribute."

For an athlete who took Ritalin for attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) as a child, it is also his most surprising asset.

I would say that's his least surprising asset! If there's a "gift" in ADHD, this mindset is it. What really surprises me about Phelps is his ability to make it to races on time and maintain a regular training regimen!

anonymouslyadd
08-20-12, 11:26 PM
http://www.usatoday.com/sports/olympics/beijing/swimming/2008-07-31-phelps_N.htm




I would say that's his least surprising asset! If there's a "gift" in ADHD, this mindset is it. What really surprises me about Phelps is his ability to make it to races on time and maintain a regular training regimen!
I think Phelps is at peace when he swims. I don't think it's something he can control. I've read before about the pool being a refuge for him.

ana futura
08-20-12, 11:37 PM
I think Phelps is at peace when he swims. I don't think it's something he can control. I've read before about the pool being a refuge for him.

For myself, the only time I feel "at peace" is when I'm riding my bike. It doesn't matter how I feel or the time of day or anything. Once I get on my bike and get going, the world comes into perfect order. I can't control that feeling at all, but it never fails to be there for me when I ride. The couple times I've raced, mentally I was just a demon. Physcally my conditioning was not there, but mentally all I wanted to do was pass everyone around me and ride as fast as I could. Nothing else mattered at all.

Sandy4957
08-21-12, 09:15 AM
Yeah, you have to laugh at the article making fun of him for speaking in non sequitors.

Um, hello, he just swam how far how fast?

I'm surprised he can still BREATHE, let alone speak in coherent sentences...

sighduck
08-21-12, 10:08 AM
wow... just read that phelps might be loosing his medals for violating an advertising agreement according to olympic rules

http://usa.chinadaily.com.cn/sports/2012-08/20/content_15690020.htm

Fortune
08-21-12, 08:50 PM
I hope not. The ads were supposed to run after the lockout period. Dude earned his medals and didn't break any rules. It's not his fault stuff was leaked.

Conman
08-22-12, 12:35 AM
...i think he deserves an extra medal for using a "drug" that is the opposite of performance-enhancing, and that he managed to get his high *** off a couch to go practice and train regardless (albeit i doubt he got high then went training the same day)

sighduck
08-27-12, 10:24 AM
He is not in question for doping of any sort... its related to endorcement and add campaign rules

Flory
08-27-12, 12:41 PM
Just came across a related article in the UK Guardian: "What can athletes with ADHD teach us about the condition?" (http://www.guardian.co.uk/society/2012/aug/01/athletes-with-adhd)

(I'm not sure the article truly addressed the question posed in the title, but it seemed unusually "grounded" as far as articles on ADHD and famous people go.)

Here's an excerpt:
Athletes like Phelps and McKenzie do not, however, have special powers via their condition. Bilbow believes it is actually significantly harder for people with ADHD to become elite athletes. "Having ADHD doesn't mean you're going to be a great sportsperson," she says. "Your ADHD isn't going to get you there, it's hard work that will. ADHD is not a contributor towards success but equally it is not a barrier to success."

People with ADHD, which is a developmental disorder, may find they have poor problem-solving skills, and struggle with timekeeping, and organising and motivating themselves, explains Bilbow. This may suggest that adapting to the discipline demanded by athletic training is tough for those with ADHD and yet Bilbow believes many with the condition find sport gives them the kind of immediate rewards and sense of achievement they need to build confidence and resilience.


reading the comments on this story reallllly irritated me :( this is what we are facing as people with ADHD so much ignorance :(

Fuzzy12
08-27-12, 01:47 PM
I think Phelp is at peace when he swims. I don't think it's something he can control. I've read before about the pool being a refuge for him.

I love swimming and I actually feel a bit at peace when I'm in the pool. There is something about the regular constant motion of gliding in and out of the water that is very, very soothing. It feels harmonious as well, which isn't something that I often feel. I guess, the feeling of being immersed in water also feels a bit like being sheltered. Err..soothing anyway. (Sorry, if this doesn't make much sense :o)

Like Ana said though my biggest problem is making it to the pool. On average, I probably go twice a year inspite of how much I love it.

Flory
08-27-12, 01:50 PM
i feel the same when im training and competing at taekwondo