View Full Version : Homeschool Advice?


manismom
09-26-12, 03:13 PM
I'm looking at the possibility of homeschooling my 1st grade daughter and could use some advice from those who have been there.

We have the option for a FREE homeschool program through K12 online schools. I assume that they are a legit company since they are partnered with our state.

The main reason that K12 is so attractive to me are that 1) the school and all books and materials are free. 2) they say that its easy for the "parent coach" to follow the plan because of lesson plans and other support materials. and 3) I don't have to partner with a religious based homeschool organization. In our state, you still have to have a "real" school as a partner, somehow. And 4) Since it is partnered with my state, they use the same or similar text books and testing materials, so it "counts" the same and should be pretty easy to transition back to "in-person" public school if we want.

Anyone have experience with this program?

I have my own issues with ADHD and I am really afraid I am not even close to being organized enough to pull this off without screwing up my kid's education.

ccom5100
09-26-12, 03:38 PM
I don't have experience with that particular program, as it was not offered in my State. But, considering the fact that it is free and conforms with your State's requirements, I think it would definitely be worth trying. Good luck and don't worry about homeschooling. When I tried it, I was worried too, but found that it was a wonderful experience. And for 1st grade, how badly could you possibly screw up? :)

manismom
09-27-12, 03:19 PM
ccom5100 - That was my thought about the program. But when it ~seems~ too good to be true, I get mighty suspicious. I'm wondering how "simple to follow" this plan would be.

And I'm not a very patient person. I'm so much better than I used to be (gawd, I was awful in my 20s) especially since I started taking stimulants. But I don't want to end up being the awful teacher who makes her feel worse about herself and reinforces it even more by being her MOM.

I know I probably won't do that, but it is still really hard for me to stay on task and not get distracted by the 200 million things I need/want to do.

There are quite a few people around me that feel I wouldn't do the job adequately and if she didn't make some HUGE improvement, the backlash would be really tough for me to handle.

Believe me, I will do what I need to do to make sure my sweet baby girl is not having her love of learning crushed by (&$#^#%@ public schools, that's a mighty scary limb for me to step out onto.

zette93
09-27-12, 08:57 PM
There may be other "umbrella schools" in your area that will let you select from several curriculums, provide all books and materials for free, and have a teacher you check in with monthly to make sure you're covering the right things. I'd be concerned if K12 only has one curriculum -- what if it is a poor match for your daughter? Especially if it is online -- there is one called Time4Learning that many people seem to like that my son found deadly dull.

Luvmybully
09-27-12, 10:31 PM
I am not familiar with the program, but I have to say that I know people who have chosen to home school their children with needs that do not fit into the typical school mold, and their children THRIVED.

I personally know several whose children are now self sufficient self supporting parenting adults.

You CAN teach a 1st grader. And just because you home school now does not mean you have to do it for your child's entire scholastic career.

zette93
09-28-12, 08:57 AM
Found a site with a number of online homeschool options, if you want to compare the various programs:

http://www.homeschool-curriculum.org/homeschool-online.html

LynneC
09-28-12, 09:00 AM
manismom, if you are really considering homeschooling, try to find a local group of moms in your area that are already homeschooling. You should be able to get some good info that way.

And yes, K12 is a legit company. They partner with our state also in offering online programs for students who opt not to attend a brick and mortar school...

ccom5100
09-28-12, 09:20 AM
manismom, if you are really considering homeschooling, try to find a local group of moms in your area that are already homeschooling. You should be able to get some good info that way.
And yes, K12 is a legit company. They partner with our state also in offering online programs for students who opt not to attend a brick and mortar school...

Also, homeschooling usually takes about 1/2 the time of regular school. We found lots of things to supplement our day with. Make sure you do field trips that are both educational and fun, like a trip to the zoo.

We have an Explora museum in our area that offers a weekly homeschool class, our local library also offers homeschool classes periodically, and our City's parks and rec department offers a homeschool PE class 2X/week.

A theatre in our area offers a "schooltime series" with matinees of certain shows for school children to attend, which is also open to homeschool kids. We saw some great shows at $2 ticket.

Amtram
09-28-12, 11:23 AM
Keep in mind your own abilities and limitations. My kids would have benefited from homeschooling if I were not the one responsible for providing it, which is why they went to public schools and we just did a lot of other stuff on the side.

silivrentoliel
09-28-12, 01:03 PM
Sorry, attention span of a gnat here today, but one of my really good friends uses the K12 program for her two boys and (while it's her first year doing it), she is loving it- especially since her older son (who has ADHD) is able to fly through the subjects he loves, and she can work with him at his pace on the more difficult ones.

As for ideas... This may have already been said, so I'm sorry if I'm repeating anything, but I learn best hands on. If I'm learning about math, give me... well, nothing. I hate math. Um... ok, history. Where I live, there is a LOT of history from around the Civil War and before, and then again around WW1 and WW2. That being the case, rather than having to sit and read horribly boring materials that put you both to sleep, you could take her on a field trip to see that kind of thing- so rather than just reading about it- you're seeing it. She can walk on the history and feel it... it's tactile.

Maybe that's the word I'm looking for. She may be a tactile learner. My friends adopted a boy with ADHD, BD, and a few other things and he wasn't getting the history of Arkansas in school at ALL. So, I borrowed him for a day and we took our dogs down to the historic site. Seeing his face light up as he realized he was walking on what was left of an old wall that used to house soldiers was the most amazing thing to him.

I'm totally rambling now, lol. Sorry.

rickymooston
09-30-12, 12:42 PM
I am really afraid I am not even close to being organized enough to pull this off without screwing up my kid's education.

I have no experience with it.

People who are knowledgible supply their kids with a better education but it may come at the cost of their kids social skills.

Assumimg your kid also has ADHD, I can understand a need to do this.

Do you have a book that provides some ADHD coaching guidelines?

The partner school tells the material needed?

ccom5100
09-30-12, 01:20 PM
People who are knowledgible supply their kids with a better education but it may come at the cost of their kids social skills.


This is a usual misconception about homeschooling. There are many opportunities for homeschooled kids to socialize. As a matter of fact, many homeschooled kids have better social skills because they are used to interacting not only with kids their own age, but with children of various ages and also with adults. They have the opportunity to spend more time in real world activities rather than being cooped up in a classroom all day, when the only opportunity to socialize is usually during the lunch break. Naturally, there are some homeschoolers who keep their kids shielded from the "evils of society," but they are the nut jobs, and not the norm.

Luvmybully
09-30-12, 06:19 PM
This is a usual misconception about homeschooling. There are many opportunities for homeschooled kids to socialize. As a matter of fact, many homeschooled kids have better social skills because they are used to interacting not only with kids their own age, but with children of various ages and also with adults. They have the opportunity to spend more time in real world activities rather than being cooped up in a classroom all day, when the only opportunity to socialize is usually during the lunch break. Naturally, there are some homeschoolers who keep their kids shielded from the "evils of society," but they are the nut jobs, and not the norm.

This is so true!

A lot of people mistake the process of socialization with acts of socializing.

NEOmom
10-03-12, 01:14 PM
There was an interesting show on NPR today about online schools. Not specific to add/adhd though. http://www.ideastream.org/soi/entry/49311 I'm thinking about homeschooling my first grader too. Haven't made a decision yet.