View Full Version : ADHD: Thoughts for Teens with ADD/ADHD to Consider


JoeB
10-05-12, 02:11 AM
Welcome all, I'd like to call this Chicken Soup for the ADHD soul if you will. Cool line right? Took me all of 2 minutes to think of it, ok, maybe 3 hours with help from google.....anyway.

A lot of people with ADHD suffer from the issues it can cause. In threads from the past with the website, as I'm sure some of the more active members can tell you about, I proclaimed ADHD as a gift and used some examples as to how it can be seen as such.

I help teens with problems often through a few various websites or personal one on one. It can be from anything between boy/girl trouble to bullying. It's a wide range.

This made me look into seeking a Sociology degree, which is what my main course of study is currently in college.

Recently, I have gotten questions from teens that made me think about the ADHD. Some teens out there are left undiagnosed for some time and suffer with Learning Disabilities or find themselves being in trouble for class disruptions. Some can't stay focused to save their lives and several are seeing so many school and personal issues because of ADHD.

Some don't even realize they have it, and those who do, find themselves hating the aspect of the condition.

The human brain is seemingly a normally active thing, always going and always at work. The ADHD brain however, moves faster and on a brain scan, looks like a Christmas tree in comparison to a normal brain. This can cause some to get less sleep, lose attention fast, or have issues learning.

However, there are some ways that I have found out by personal experience that CAN help the ADHD teen. Especially with school. So here are some tips that can help with school and possibly even jobs and your personal life.

Because focus is tough, I find that because the ADHD brain is always wanting something interesting to focus on, the best thing to do is give it that.

Ever try reading and then find yourself not remembering a word from the book you read the next day or two? The reason is not that you did not comprehend what you read, you simply forgot it and probably were never interested in the book you read. Which meant that your eyes followed, but you took it into your human "recycle bin". It was emptied the moment you put that book down.

Here are some tricks for reading when you know a book is going to bore you. Listen to music.

Listening to music has been a known help for several brain conditions in the past, and there are studies to prove it can work for learning. For the ADHD, the way it can help is that it will keep the pleasure center of the brain happy. You're listening to music which means you're not bored. This keeps you active and at the ready. When you read, you'll be more attentive and able to take in more material and it won't be emptied the moment you read it.

After you read something, do one of two things.

If you're the writer type, write about the book some. Type out out write down parts of the book that interested or did not interest you. Personal highlights if you will. For those who like to talk, simply talk with a family member or friend about the thing you read.

From what I can gather in this for me, whenever I talk about the material I read. I instantly am able to keep it in the front of my brain. It makes me remember it for easy access because I spoke about it off and on with people.

For me, this has been a big help. Especially for new material I have to read up on. It even can help me keep focused to do math homework. Now THAT is saying something.

Music first, talking later. Seems like a weird way to read, but it can not only help, it can also improve grades in school.

Ways to remember may be the hardest part for ADHD teens. For me, I don't know how many times I forgot to do something for class. I'd forget a test was going on and not study and it would show on test scores.

Here is a trick for remembering. We are a big tech society, so why not use electronic reminders? Put them on a loop to occur in your thoughts throughout the day. This way, you cannot forget about something. You can write yourself notes and put them in places you will obviously visit. For instance, above the toilet. You'll see it every morning. On the refrigerator, you know you're going to eat. The car steering wheel, you cannot avoid this when you get in a car.

Making sure you never can let something get out of your head is by far the best way to keep an event fresh in your mind. You'd literally have to try and forget in order to do so if you did this.


Intelligence.

It is usually one of the top things people without ADHD believe those with ADHD lack. It's actually quite the contrary, ADHD people have more abilities to become intelligent than the average person. Our brains are always very active and super strong. Material we can know and access is very well known by scientists. This has led some some scientists to study highly intelligent people in history to see if they had a similar brain disorder.

Now, how can you increase intelligence? This has always been widely debated. But for the ADHD, it's quite easy. Always keep learning something new. Reading has been known to increase intelligence in teens by more than 50%. Those who read frequently or often, usually are the one's getting higher test scores according to studies.

So, why can the ADHD not get in on the action? I have found in the last 5 years, that I not only have increased my intelligence, but almost quadrupled my knowledge from the age of 17 to where it is now, close to the age of 23. All the while, I read a lot throughout the day.

It doesn't have to be a science journal or even a ton of library books. Simply keeping up with AOL and Yahoo events every day and reading on them can add to knowledge and help you increase intelligence.

Again, it's widely disputed on how intelligence in maintained. But it's a common fact that reading often does help.

Testing for the ADHD can also be an issue.

How many people out there have frozen on a test? You could have studied all night and all week and the moment you got there, you lost it.

This can affect more people than those with ADHD. But, it often kills the ADHD. But, you can surprise yourself with what you really know, even if you didn't study hard for a test.

I conducted a personal experiment recently.

I decided to not study for a test and only go off remembering what I could from the class lectures.

When I got on the campus for test day, I started to go over what my test could be on. What chapters, which definitions, etc.

When I got in class and sat down to take my test, I went through all 30 questions. Including the extra bonus essay question.

As I do before every test, I prayed to the good Lord above that I do as good as I could do on the test. For him to help me remember what I know.

I pulled out an 83 on the test without studying.

Now, how did I do that?

Basically, before I froze I was already thinking before class time about what I'd be talking about. Putting the material in the front of my brain giving me time to access it and go over different stuff I remembered for the test. Then I sat down, and prayed.

Now, prayer is basically a way for one to calm themselves and help to release nerves that could lead to being frozen. You can chose to take deep breathes in and simply shake off nerves.

This can release the issue before test time.

I did this and was able to pull out an 83.

This is a good grade, a B. I even answered the essay question to get some extra points. I could remember an entire diagram.

What if I studied before the test? Wouldn't you think that I'd do better along with these tips? I bet so.

I like to recommend to those with ADHD, to take a test in another room. Give yourself as much isolation as possible. This way there is no distraction. It's all you and the test.



I recommend trying some of these tips if you're a teen who is having some ADHD issues when it comes to school especially. Let me know how they work for you; if they didn't work, if they did.

You should never feel handicapped by ADHD. You have a lot to offer when it comes to this sort of thing. I like to say ADHD has been a gift for me, and it has been. I never have said ADHD does not cause some issues along the way. It's how we handle those issues that makes us who we are however. Don't let ADHD hold you back. You can do this!

fracturedstory
10-05-12, 05:11 AM
Well put. You explained it very well. Not long ago I decided to just allow ADHD to take my mind to different places. I would focus on science sites and I just signed up to Reddit, because I really want to get away from Facebook. Quora is another good site to just read and learn and get into discussions about so many topics.

If I'm not watching videos on my computer or playing a game the music is on. So, I can vouch for this method as being very effective. The point is for the music to help get you engaged in a book that you barely notice it's playing. I do this with writing and exercise too.

I don't write or talk about what I've read but I read a bit each day. So if it's a novel I read one chapter one day and the next day when I read the next chapter I still remember enough to follow what's going on. I read the newspaper (digitally) everyday too.
I dwell on what I've read though. I go over it in my mind, think about what the author is trying to get through, why they would write something like that and where they are taking the story. For most science articles I probably write down some information if I think I can use it in my writing. Like today I wrote down notes on game development. I read the material but bookmarking the page wasn't enough, I needed to write it out.

For the test one though, people can have different learning styles. I know I'm a point to point sequential learner, who needs to learn each part and draw up diagrams and that sort of thing. There are people that don't need to study for tests but that never worked out in my favour. I've never done a test post-ADHD diagnosis though.

Anyway, good tips.

sarahsweets
10-05-12, 09:02 AM
Welcome all, I'd like to call this Chicken Soup for the ADHD soul if you will. Cool line right? Took me all of 2 minutes to think of it, ok, maybe 3 hours with help from google.....anyway.

A lot of people with ADHD suffer from the issues it can cause. In threads from the past with the website, as I'm sure some of the more active members can tell you about, I proclaimed ADHD as a gift and used some examples as to how it can be seen as such.

I help teens with problems often through a few various websites or personal one on one. It can be from anything between boy/girl trouble to bullying. It's a wide range.

This made me look into seeking a Sociology degree, which is what my main course of study is currently in college.

Recently, I have gotten questions from teens that made me think about the ADHD. Some teens out there are left undiagnosed for some time and suffer with Learning Disabilities or find themselves being in trouble for class disruptions. Some can't stay focused to save their lives and several are seeing so many school and personal issues because of ADHD.

Some don't even realize they have it, and those who do, find themselves hating the aspect of the condition.

The human brain is seemingly a normally active thing, always going and always at work. The ADHD brain however, moves faster and on a brain scan, looks like a Christmas tree in comparison to a normal brain. This can cause some to get less sleep, lose attention fast, or have issues learning.

However, there are some ways that I have found out by personal experience that CAN help the ADHD teen. Especially with school. So here are some tips that can help with school and possibly even jobs and your personal life.

Because focus is tough, I find that because the ADHD brain is always wanting something interesting to focus on, the best thing to do is give it that.

Ever try reading and then find yourself not remembering a word from the book you read the next day or two? The reason is not that you did not comprehend what you read, you simply forgot it and probably were never interested in the book you read. Which meant that your eyes followed, but you took it into your human "recycle bin". It was emptied the moment you put that book down.

Here are some tricks for reading when you know a book is going to bore you. Listen to music.

Listening to music has been a known help for several brain conditions in the past, and there are studies to prove it can work for learning. For the ADHD, the way it can help is that it will keep the pleasure center of the brain happy. You're listening to music which means you're not bored. This keeps you active and at the ready. When you read, you'll be more attentive and able to take in more material and it won't be emptied the moment you read it.

After you read something, do one of two things.

If you're the writer type, write about the book some. Type out out write down parts of the book that interested or did not interest you. Personal highlights if you will. For those who like to talk, simply talk with a family member or friend about the thing you read.

From what I can gather in this for me, whenever I talk about the material I read. I instantly am able to keep it in the front of my brain. It makes me remember it for easy access because I spoke about it off and on with people.

For me, this has been a big help. Especially for new material I have to read up on. It even can help me keep focused to do math homework. Now THAT is saying something.

Music first, talking later. Seems like a weird way to read, but it can not only help, it can also improve grades in school.

Ways to remember may be the hardest part for ADHD teens. For me, I don't know how many times I forgot to do something for class. I'd forget a test was going on and not study and it would show on test scores.

Here is a trick for remembering. We are a big tech society, so why not use electronic reminders? Put them on a loop to occur in your thoughts throughout the day. This way, you cannot forget about something. You can write yourself notes and put them in places you will obviously visit. For instance, above the toilet. You'll see it every morning. On the refrigerator, you know you're going to eat. The car steering wheel, you cannot avoid this when you get in a car.

Making sure you never can let something get out of your head is by far the best way to keep an event fresh in your mind. You'd literally have to try and forget in order to do so if you did this.


Intelligence.

It is usually one of the top things people without ADHD believe those with ADHD lack. It's actually quite the contrary, ADHD people have more abilities to become intelligent than the average person. Our brains are always very active and super strong. Material we can know and access is very well known by scientists. This has led some some scientists to study highly intelligent people in history to see if they had a similar brain disorder.

Now, how can you increase intelligence? This has always been widely debated. But for the ADHD, it's quite easy. Always keep learning something new. Reading has been known to increase intelligence in teens by more than 50%. Those who read frequently or often, usually are the one's getting higher test scores according to studies.

So, why can the ADHD not get in on the action? I have found in the last 5 years, that I not only have increased my intelligence, but almost quadrupled my knowledge from the age of 17 to where it is now, close to the age of 23. All the while, I read a lot throughout the day.

It doesn't have to be a science journal or even a ton of library books. Simply keeping up with AOL and Yahoo events every day and reading on them can add to knowledge and help you increase intelligence.

Again, it's widely disputed on how intelligence in maintained. But it's a common fact that reading often does help.

Testing for the ADHD can also be an issue.

How many people out there have frozen on a test? You could have studied all night and all week and the moment you got there, you lost it.

This can affect more people than those with ADHD. But, it often kills the ADHD. But, you can surprise yourself with what you really know, even if you didn't study hard for a test.

I conducted a personal experiment recently.

I decided to not study for a test and only go off remembering what I could from the class lectures.

When I got on the campus for test day, I started to go over what my test could be on. What chapters, which definitions, etc.

When I got in class and sat down to take my test, I went through all 30 questions. Including the extra bonus essay question.

As I do before every test, I prayed to the good Lord above that I do as good as I could do on the test. For him to help me remember what I know.

I pulled out an 83 on the test without studying.

Now, how did I do that?

Basically, before I froze I was already thinking before class time about what I'd be talking about. Putting the material in the front of my brain giving me time to access it and go over different stuff I remembered for the test. Then I sat down, and prayed.

Now, prayer is basically a way for one to calm themselves and help to release nerves that could lead to being frozen. You can chose to take deep breathes in and simply shake off nerves.

This can release the issue before test time.

I did this and was able to pull out an 83.

This is a good grade, a B. I even answered the essay question to get some extra points. I could remember an entire diagram.

What if I studied before the test? Wouldn't you think that I'd do better along with these tips? I bet so.

I like to recommend to those with ADHD, to take a test in another room. Give yourself as much isolation as possible. This way there is no distraction. It's all you and the test.



I recommend trying some of these tips if you're a teen who is having some ADHD issues when it comes to school especially. Let me know how they work for you; if they didn't work, if they did.

You should never feel handicapped by ADHD. You have a lot to offer when it comes to this sort of thing. I like to say ADHD has been a gift for me, and it has been. I never have said ADHD does not cause some issues along the way. It's how we handle those issues that makes us who we are however. Don't let ADHD hold you back. You can do this!


I agree with alot of what you said except that intelligence has little to do with adhd.

NATIVE762
10-05-12, 11:23 AM
Scary wall of text!!!!!

(and i don't have my coookie!!!)

JoeB
10-05-12, 11:36 AM
Technically, it has been proven with brain scans done by neurology that the ADHD brain, due to it's activity, has more abilities long term to continue learning and increasing intelligence than the average brain. This is why, as I said, science has looked back in history to see geniuses such as Da Vinci, and try and make similarities with ADHD. Same with Edison.

Obviously, with both men various brain things have been taken into account. But ADHD is a common path with both men according to scientists.

In reading up on neurology when it comes to ADHD, along with talking to a few Neurologists. The common thing with them is that the ADHD have a lot of ability to take in material. The normal brain can do so as well. The reason it seems ADHD people are looked at as dumb by some, is that they interrupt classes, try and make jokes about a lot of stuff, and cannot stay focused.

Those however, who can stay focused and learn, frequently have a higher IQ compared to a normal person. This according to the UAB department neuros I spoke with. The issue has come that, testing on a wide national basis for this is tough. Because, how do you find ADHD people who can stay focused and learn enough to make a study? So, it's just based on their personal finding between school/hospital study.

JoeB
10-05-12, 11:37 AM
Scary wall of text!!!!!

(and i don't have my coookie!!!)

Break it down and read it sentence by sentence. So it's easier to read. I wrote it so that people such as myself or others wouldn't get overwhelmed with several long-winded paragraphs.

Drewbacca
10-05-12, 10:05 PM
Technically, it has been proven with brain scans done by neurology that the ADHD brain, due to it's activity, has more abilities long term to continue learning and increasing intelligence than the average brain. This is why, as I said, science has looked back in history to see geniuses such as Da Vinci, and try and make similarities with ADHD. Same with Edison.


If you are going to make bold claims, please provide references to back them up. I would love to see this proof that you speak of. I'd also love to see your evidence that Da Vinci and Edison had the same disorder.

But, Sarah is right. It's not a bad post if you take away the unfounded comments about ADHD and intelligence. I'll leave it at that, as this has been discussed in detail in other threads.

fracturedstory
10-05-12, 10:30 PM
There's an interesting article in COSMOS magazine about genius and neurological disorders, and they talk about how much research goes into the whole 'Einstein may have had AS' or 'Edison may have had ADHD.' It's not just a bunch of randoms on the internet reading a couple of books and jumping to conclusions - which is what I had always thought.

The link: http://www.cosmosmagazine.com/features/print/2687/do-you-have-be-nuts-be-a-genius

I still stand by my brain that never stops talking to me, my many interests (making it possible for me to talk about more than sci-fi or physics), being distracted and impulsive and not second guessing my decision because of peer pressure, that I am somewhat intelligent.
Also, no writer's block, ever.

JoeB
10-06-12, 12:37 AM
There's an interesting article in COSMOS magazine about genius and neurological disorders, and they talk about how much research goes into the whole 'Einstein may have had AS' or 'Edison may have had ADHD.' It's not just a bunch of randoms on the internet reading a couple of books and jumping to conclusions - which is what I had always thought.

The link: http://www.cosmosmagazine.com/features/print/2687/do-you-have-be-nuts-be-a-genius

I still stand by my brain that never stops talking to me, my many interests (making it possible for me to talk about more than sci-fi or physics), being distracted and impulsive and not second guessing my decision because of peer pressure, that I am somewhat intelligent.
Also, no writer's block, ever.


Yeah, the one you mentioned was a good article on this. I mentioned above that UAB Neurology close to me has done studies on this too. But the thing is, and what a lot of people don't realize. Everyone has the capacity to be a genius really. IMO, people can be all they want to be.

However, there are several claims with ADHD for example, that claim due to hyperactivity and several other so called "issues" ADHD causes, the capacity to learn or increase intelligence is far more common than that of a normal person.

We all can debate this until blue in the face. But when you see a ton of ADHD people succeeding and showing great intelligence, it starts to make you think a bit. Guess that's why science has looked into it a bit.

Rootkit
10-06-12, 12:49 AM
Yeah, the one you mentioned was a good article on this. I mentioned above that UAB Neurology close to me has done studies on this too. But the thing is, and what a lot of people don't realize. Everyone has the capacity to be a genius really. IMO, people can be all they want to be.

However, there are several claims with ADHD for example, that claim due to hyperactivity and several other so called "issues" ADHD causes, the capacity to learn or increase intelligence is far more common than that of a normal person.

We all can debate this until blue in the face. But when you see a ton of ADHD people succeeding and showing great intelligence, it starts to make you think a bit. Guess that's why science has looked into it a bit.

I'm not sure what you're gauging intelligence off of when you make these claims...? Like, I had to do a fair amount of testing in school regarding intelligence, what's generally accepted as intelligence by psychologists insofar as my understanding goes isn't considered to be that mutable. Of course, that was 5 - 10 years ago so my facts might be out-of-date for all I know.

JoeB
10-06-12, 01:02 AM
I'm not sure what you're gauging intelligence off of when you make these claims...? Like, I had to do a fair amount of testing in school regarding intelligence, what's generally accepted as intelligence by psychologists insofar as my understanding goes isn't considered to be that mutable. Of course, that was 5 - 10 years ago so my facts might be out-of-date for all I know.


The article that was mentioned about that Fractured put out basically dealt with the theory of one having to have some sort of brain disorder to actually be a genius. I am not saying people who are ADHD are all geniuses, just that they have more of a capability that one might think due to the way their brain is formatted. Studies that neurological science has done has backed these claims up, the article she mentioned above was one of them.

Of course, different Universities and clinics have gone into their own.

I am not saying you go off of just how an ADHD person is in high school compared to normal kids of course

Rootkit
10-06-12, 01:32 AM
The article that was mentioned about that Fractured put out basically dealt with the theory of one having to have some sort of brain disorder to actually be a genius. I am not saying people who are ADHD are all geniuses, just that they have more of a capability that one might think due to the way their brain is formatted. Studies that neurological science has done has backed these claims up, the article she mentioned above was one of them.

Of course, different Universities and clinics have gone into their own.

I am not saying you go off of just how an ADHD person is in high school compared to normal kids of course

My contention is less with what the correlation between mental disorders and intelligence is and more with saying things like "anyone can be a genius". Feels too much like hyperbole. People can train to strengthen their long-term memory, make their working memory more efficient, recognize patterns more readily, etc. But people have limitations, it's just a matter of how they want to handle them.

I think it's better to just aim to be successful than to be intelligent. Intelligence doesn't guarantee success. IMHO, in general it tends to take a back seat to effort and passion.

Maybe I'm just arguing semantics, which is completely possible. I certainly feel pessimistic with this post! And of course I could be wrong. I just tend to believe that focusing too strongly on intelligence isn't really healthy or meaningful.

JoeB
10-06-12, 01:50 AM
My contention is less with what the correlation between mental disorders and intelligence is and more with saying things like "anyone can be a genius". Feels too much like hyperbole. People can train to strengthen their long-term memory, make their working memory more efficient, recognize patterns more readily, etc. But people have limitations, it's just a matter of how they want to handle them.

I think it's better to just aim to be successful than to be intelligent. Intelligence doesn't guarantee success. IMHO, in general it tends to take a back seat to effort and passion.

Maybe I'm just arguing semantics, which is completely possible. I certainly feel pessimistic with this post! And of course I could be wrong. I just tend to believe that focusing too strongly on intelligence isn't really healthy or meaningful.

Increasing intelligence was simply one part of the original post of course. It was a tip based post for teens, mostly for school purposes.

Intelligence I find is very key, especially when doing interviews for jobs. Personally, due to my intelligence I have been offered the chance to interview for jobs that I did not qualify for on paper. Just the overall proof without any sort of needed evidence was the huge thing.

Now, I have trained myself up to be able to know various ways to learn. So, I am always increasing my intelligence. Just today, I blew someone away and they asked me if I was a Neurologist or a teacher. I told them no, I simply do a lot of reading. Which, is true. Of course I do take courses that involve this sort of thing, but none are neurology courses. I am certainly not a teacher.

So, that alone is a reason intelligence is key in this world.

Just playing apples to apples here of course. ;)

Rootkit
10-06-12, 02:02 AM
Increasing intelligence was simply one part of the original post of course. It was a tip based post for teens, mostly for school purposes.

Intelligence I find is very key, especially when doing interviews for jobs. Personally, due to my intelligence I have been offered the chance to interview for jobs that I did not qualify for on paper. Just the overall proof without any sort of needed evidence was the huge thing.

Now, I have trained myself up to be able to know various ways to learn. So, I am always increasing my intelligence. Just today, I blew someone away and they asked me if I was a Neurologist or a teacher. I told them no, I simply do a lot of reading. Which, is true. Of course I do take courses that involve this sort of thing, but none are neurology courses. I am certainly not a teacher.

So, that alone is a reason intelligence is key in this world.

Just playing apples to apples here of course. ;)

Knowledge isn't intelligence. They're generally accepted as two independent things, I'm pretty sure most people won't debate that. Certainly in daily life most people don't bother debating the semantics of it and the terms might be interchangeable to a degree, but I guess I'm just pitching in a mild concern that I've already admitted might be very fidgety. I really wouldn't be bringing it up unless I thought it was detrimental to focus too strongly on intelligence; I genuinely believe that there are more important ingredients to success.

JoeB
10-07-12, 02:11 AM
Knowledge isn't intelligence. They're generally accepted as two independent things, I'm pretty sure most people won't debate that. Certainly in daily life most people don't bother debating the semantics of it and the terms might be interchangeable to a degree, but I guess I'm just pitching in a mild concern that I've already admitted might be very fidgety. I really wouldn't be bringing it up unless I thought it was detrimental to focus too strongly on intelligence; I genuinely believe that there are more important ingredients to success.

It's difficult for one to really pinpoint a way to measure intelligence if they never add knowledge in as a part of the sum total of the entire intelligence study. If I said, please, everything you know, leave it out. Then, do you think that the things they would know for an IQ test for example could work? No. Why? Because for example, I had to know the answer to who invented the polo vaccine, Jonas Salk. Or who shot Abraham Lincoln, John Wilkes Booth. Both btw, were asked on the IQ test I took years ago.

So, that said, knowledge is a key element to intelligence

Intelligence and Knowledge go hand in hand my friend

Fuzzy12
10-07-12, 08:10 AM
i think that you need a certain amount of intelligence to able to acquire knowledge and to know when and how to use it. I don't think though that the kind of intelligence that is tested in iq tests is highly related to being successful. There are so many other variables that play a role in success apart from spatial verbal numerical and logical reasoning. Luck and opportunities aren't that unimportant either. Also how you define success is pretty subjective as is how you define intelligence apart from iq tests. I liked your op though. Like fractured said it's pretty well written and quite interesting. The only problem i have with relating adhd to intelligence or success is that it makes those who are not successful feel either less intelligent or even more disabled than the general adhd population when that is not the case as the common consensus is that adhd and intelligence are not related. Err hope that made some sense.

jeaniebug
08-13-13, 06:46 PM
...However, there are some ways that I have found out by personal experience that CAN help the ADHD teen. Especially with school. So here are some tips that can help with school and possibly even jobs and your personal life.

Because focus is tough, I find that because the ADHD brain is always wanting something interesting to focus on, the best thing to do is give it that.

I appreciate this thread on helping ADHD teens. That first post is monumentally long, however...

But the part of the post that I find interesting, and very true, is that you must give the ADHD brain something interesting to focus on.

I got a degree in Geology because I was completely fascinated by the subject from the first day of the first class to the last day. I ended up with a Master's degree and a career in geology because I am still fascinated and still learning interesting things about the geological history of certain regions and of the earth, really.

I NEVER would have made it if I had majored in accounting or business.

I think this thread got too focused on that intelligence question. I think there is a very wide range of intelligence in ADHD, just as there is in the general population.

libertynow
09-09-14, 01:05 PM
Chicken Soup For The ADD soul would be nice book to read.