View Full Version : Article on autistic kids "running away"


Dizfriz
10-08-12, 06:28 AM
Interesting article.

http://www.reuters.com/article/2012/10/08/us-running-away-common-with-autism-idUSBRE89703520121008

A quote: Autism researcher Russell Lang from Texas State University-San Marcos said the prevalence of running away or "eloping" in children with autism "absolutely surprised" him.

"It's a very dangerous behavior, and it's a little bit deceptive because it can seem somewhat benign compared to other challenging behaviors," Lang, who wasn't involved in the new study, told Reuters Health. Hopefully this may spur research into products and ways of helping with this issue.


Dizfriz

Vector
10-18-12, 11:38 PM
When I was a kid my parents lost me during a summer vacation in a Southern European country. Eventually they found me sitting between carbagemen in a carbage truck. :scratch: :lol:

But isn't it normal for kids in general wanting to explore their surroundings. I don't see why this is supposed to be a typical autistic thing?

Fortune
10-18-12, 11:52 PM
My parents put a chain lock on the front door before I was even a year old because they caught me wandering, twice. I think calling it "running away" is a bit of a misnomer. While I did wander, I never tried to run away. Even the time I disappeared for a full day.


But isn't it normal for kids in general wanting to explore their surroundings. I don't see why this is supposed to be a typical autistic thing?

Because a study found that nearly half of all autistic children wander (http://www.aap.org/en-us/about-the-aap/aap-press-room/pages/Study-Finds-Nearly-Half-of-Children-with-Autism-Wander-Off.aspx?nfstatus=401&nftoken=00000000-0000-0000-0000-000000000000&nfstatusdescription=ERROR%3a+No+local+token).

Here's the study itself (http://pediatrics.aappublications.org/content/early/2012/10/02/peds.2012-0762).


OBJECTIVES: Anecdotal reports suggest that elopement behavior in children with autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) increases risk of injury or death and places a major burden on families. This study assessed parent-reported elopement occurrence and associated factors among children with ASDs.


METHODS: Information on elopement frequency, associated characteristics, and consequences was collected via an online questionnaire. The study sample included 1218 children with ASD and 1076 of their siblings without ASD. The association among family sociodemographic and child clinical characteristics and time to first elopement was estimated by using a Cox proportional hazards model.


RESULTS: Forty-nine percent (n = 598) of survey respondents reported their child with an ASD had attempted to elope at least once after age 4 years; 26% (n = 316) were missing long enough to cause concern. Of those who went missing, 24% were in danger of drowning and 65% were in danger of traffic injury. Elopement risk was associated with autism severity, increasing, on average, 9% for every 10-point increase in Social Responsiveness Scale T score (relative risk 1.09, 95% confidence interval: 1.02, 1.16). Unaffected siblings had significantly lower rates of elopement across all ages compared with children with ASD.


CONCLUSIONS: Nearly half of children with ASD were reported to engage in elopement behavior, with a substantial number at risk for bodily harm. These results highlight the urgent need to develop interventions to reduce the risk of elopement, to support families coping with this issue, and to train child care professionals, educators, and first responders who are often involved when elopements occur.


I fit into that 26% population of those who disappeared long enough to cause concern.

Ipsofacto
10-19-12, 02:35 AM
It was a constant stress when my son was young. I do believe he has an ADHD co-morbidity which made it worse. We often had to use a harness and reins until he was about six. Just holding his hands wasn't enough, especially in crowded situations. He would constantly test your grip, and as soon as you were distracted, he would be gone.

Vector
10-20-12, 12:17 AM
My parents put a chain lock on the front door before I was even a year old because they caught me wandering, twice. I think calling it "running away" is a bit of a misnomer. While I did wander, I never tried to run away. Even the time I disappeared for a full day.



Because a study found that nearly half of all autistic children wander (http://www.aap.org/en-us/about-the-aap/aap-press-room/pages/Study-Finds-Nearly-Half-of-Children-with-Autism-Wander-Off.aspx?nfstatus=401&nftoken=00000000-0000-0000-0000-000000000000&nfstatusdescription=ERROR%3a+No+local+token).

Here's the study itself (http://pediatrics.aappublications.org/content/early/2012/10/02/peds.2012-0762).



What percentage of the normal group "disappaerd"" or "run away"?

I think it is very asymptomatic anyway. Another infamous asymtom is tiredness. It is virtually useless for confirming/supporting a diagnose because it can have a myriad of undelying causes.