View Full Version : elimination diet= amazing results


choco222
11-05-12, 08:39 AM
For anyone who is interested in alternative approaches to helping ADHD:)

I started an elimination diet about 2 months ago and I've had amazing results. I've even quit taking medication. For the first time in my life I can really focus. I know this is a controversial subject and i'm not trying to start up an argument. Everybody is different and i'm sure this doesn't work for everybody. I just wanted to share for anyone who is interested :)

So for 4 weeks I cut out gluten, dairy, additives, preservatives, salicylates (feingold diet), and only ate organic foods. Yes, it's quite extensive but there are still things you can eat:) After the 4 weeks I gradually reintroduced foods and discovered I'm allergic to dairy and additives. I also noticed gluten, though I can still focus, makes me tired and sluggish. I'm still in the process of reintroducing foods so I can't say about the other foods.

Just wanted to share my success. It's been hard and I've messed up once or twice but it has definietly been worth it. My mind is so much clearer, i'm more motivated, I can focus, and as a results my depression is gone. :)

sarahsweets
11-05-12, 08:54 AM
I'm glad for you. I'm not sure if this helps adhd though. I suspect that due to your sensitivities that once you eliminated what you're allergic to the adhd seemed to improve.

SquarePeg
11-05-12, 09:28 AM
Glad itīs working. Many foods are shown to cause problems with concentration and tiredness. It takes time and commitment to stick to a progam like this. Well done.

Drewbacca
11-05-12, 10:02 AM
Glad you found some benefit in this difficult diet. Unfortunately, it didn't work for me. :(

T-Rex65
11-05-12, 10:36 AM
I want to try something like this, but I'm too lazy to start. I need a gluten buddy or something.

SquarePeg
11-05-12, 10:56 AM
I tried just cutting out pasta, cakes, pastries etc, and all types of flour. It didnīt make any difference but I havenīt tried cutting out other stuff.

Dizfriz
11-05-12, 11:40 AM
For anyone who is interested in alternative approaches to helping ADHD

I started an elimination diet about 2 months ago and I've had amazing results. I've even quit taking medication. For the first time in my life I can really focus. I know this is a controversial subject and i'm not trying to start up an argument. Everybody is different and i'm sure this doesn't work for everybody. I just wanted to share for anyone who is interested

So for 4 weeks I cut out gluten, dairy, additives, preservatives, salicylates (feingold diet), and only ate organic foods. Yes, it's quite extensive but there are still things you can eat After the 4 weeks I gradually reintroduced foods and discovered I'm allergic to dairy and additives. I also noticed gluten, though I can still focus, makes me tired and sluggish. I'm still in the process of reintroducing foods so I can't say about the other foods.

Just wanted to share my success. It's been hard and I've messed up once or twice but it has definietly been worth it. My mind is so much clearer, i'm more motivated, I can focus, and as a results my depression is gone.

Thanks for posting your experiences.

This happens sometimes. Some people are reactive to different food substances and eliminating them can drastically reduce ADHD type symptoms or put another way, ingesting them can drastically increase ADHD symptoms.

Some who show this are actually much milder cases of ADHD but the substances make expression of symptoms much worse and can make ADHD seem much worse than it actually is.

With some who would not probably be diagnosed as ADHD, the substance reactions can move the over the diagnostic threshold.

I suspect (but can not really support) that most who show these food related reactions have some ADHD genetics somewhere in the background

Anyway I am glad it worked for you. Elimination diets do work for some but unfortunately not for most. When they do work however, they can work very well as you have seen.

Take care,

Dizfriz

Subtract81
11-05-12, 02:10 PM
For anyone who is interested in alternative approaches to helping ADHD:)

I started an elimination diet about 2 months ago and I've had amazing results. I've even quit taking medication. For the first time in my life I can really focus. I know this is a controversial subject and i'm not trying to start up an argument. Everybody is different and i'm sure this doesn't work for everybody. I just wanted to share for anyone who is interested :)

So for 4 weeks I cut out gluten, dairy, additives, preservatives, salicylates (feingold diet), and only ate organic foods. Yes, it's quite extensive but there are still things you can eat:) After the 4 weeks I gradually reintroduced foods and discovered I'm allergic to dairy and additives. I also noticed gluten, though I can still focus, makes me tired and sluggish. I'm still in the process of reintroducing foods so I can't say about the other foods.

Just wanted to share my success. It's been hard and I've messed up once or twice but it has definietly been worth it. My mind is so much clearer, i'm more motivated, I can focus, and as a results my depression is gone. :)

Would it be possible for you to share the diet you used on here so that others of us who wish to also try could possibly have a go, as i am unsure how i would eliminate everything without starving!

thanks, and great post!

Spacemaster
11-05-12, 02:19 PM
Probably not a bad idea for anyone to at least try, it might not help or maybe it would!

It can't hurt, except maybe the pocket book. Then again, many of us would try just about anything, and have already spent lots of money on doctors and medications, and other treatments.

Even if it doesn't help ADHD, I'm sure that cutting out preservatives and additives would be helpful for anyone's overall health.

Thanks for sharing!

Subtract81
11-06-12, 05:03 PM
Interesting, and seems to support studies using elimination diets... but i cannot read it all either.

Are there any studies of mothers being tested whilst babies are in utero with various diets?

Amtram
11-06-12, 05:04 PM
Problem with the blanket term "elimination diet," as I attempted to point out, is that its success is attendant upon what is eliminated and whether what is eliminated is in any way related to the problem the elimination diet is attempting to address.

In order to assess the value of the elimination diet, nothing else should be changed - meaning that you skew the possible results by simultaneously adding foods, supplements, or vitamins. The whole point of an elimination diet is to see whether or not a particular food or ingredient is creating a very specific result in your own personal body.

If you eliminate one thing at a time, and continue for several weeks and find a positive difference, then you know that for you as an individual, it is probably beneficial to avoid eating that thing. At that point, you can decide whether or not to eliminate an additional food or ingredient.

The sole benefit of an elimination diet is to discover whether or not particular foods or ingredients are causing inconvenient or detrimental effects to your physical or mental health so that you can avoid them. The diet that works for you, that alleviates one symptom or another, is not the same one that will do the same thing for anyone else, even if they have the same symptoms (although it can be helpful as a jumping-off point for someone with the same symptoms.) It does not alleviate symptoms that are not caused by the ingestion of that substance. It does not cure conditions that are not caused by ingestion of that substance. All it does is make you aware of what that substance does to your body so you can avoid it and thereby eliminate your reaction to it.

I cannot fathom why this sounds even the slightest bit unreasonable. I myself discovered that I have certain reactions to specific ingredients and have changed my diet in response to that knowledge - I just don't go around telling everyone that their experience will be exactly the same as mine.

Fraser_0762
11-06-12, 11:40 PM
Poor diet can lead to poor liver function, which can have a negative impact on every organ in the body (including the brain).

When you switch to a strictly organic diet, you're allowing your liver to cleanse itself from toxins that have built up over the years. By doing so, the liver no longer has toxins to deal with, meaning that it can now get to work on repairing other organs in the body.

It can greatly improve brain function, heart function, digestive function. It can also improve your physical appearance by having a positive impact on your skin. (the largest human organ)

The health benefits of an organic diet are more or less unlimited and I'd recommend it to everybody on the planet.

phantasm
11-07-12, 12:37 AM
I am very interested in this topic, and would love a diet that will help restore my brain health. I know certain foods affect how I feel and my energy level etc. So I like to believe that it's possible for foods to aid in my ADHD. I'm always interested in hearing what has worked for other people, and will continue to keep an open mind about it.

Dispite some of the differences in opinion and facts, I appreciate hearing all the different sides to this topic.

nanners
11-07-12, 12:47 AM
Dispite some of the differences in opinion and facts, I appreciate hearing all the different sides to this topic.

I am also interested in hearing all sides, just wish it wasn't such a debate/argument.

Anyhoo, I haven't followed any specific elimination plan or diet, but I have certainly cut things out of my diet as I know they have only caused ill effects.

I also know exercise is a huge help with my symptoms and only wish I could get off me lazy bum and incorporate more of it into my life! :D

Drewbacca
11-07-12, 01:10 AM
I am also interested in hearing all sides, just wish it wasn't such a debate/argument.


Moderator Note:
It's really a shame that this thread went in that direction. I think it's wonderful that the OP found symptom relief from dietary changes and I hope that others do as well! Beyond that, this isn't the place to debate... this is a thread to discuss our personal experience with elimination diets.

I would hope that we can all keep that in mind going forward.

tudorose
11-07-12, 07:49 AM
From a general health point of view I think an elimination diet is really good. For me I did an elimination diet of cutting out wheat and dairy.

Before this I never realised that I had a problem with dairy. For years I had suffered with IBS but once I gave up the dairy I got my morning's back, not longer having to work through the stomach cramps before I could get moving.

Wheat I've found also increases the inflammatory response in my body.

I'm also careful about eating stuff with too much MSG and salt and lollies.

Frazer is right. The less cr@p you eat the less pressure on the liver and the better your body is able to function properly.

For me this has no impact whatsoever on my ADHD. It would be nice though....

meadd823
11-08-12, 05:52 AM
Moderator Note:
It's really a shame that this thread went in that direction. I think it's wonderful that the OP found symptom relief from dietary changes and I hope that others do as well! Beyond that, this isn't the place to debate... this is a thread to discuss our personal experience with elimination diets.

I would hope that we can all keep that in mind going forward.

To reiterate staff request

Some chose to ignore the polite request therefore a more assertive approach seems to be in order

Stay on topic or your post will be removed.

This thread is about

* supporting the OP in her success,

*asking relevant questions if genuinely interested in her specific approach in hopes of repeating it for yourself or a loved one

*and sharing your own experiences with dietary modifications and whether it helped your own ADHD !


All other topics will be towed at owners expense!






........

LynneC
11-08-12, 12:06 PM
Here is a link to Dr. Doris Rapp's elimination diet. It's a popular elimination diet, and if you google it you will see a bunch of hits for it. The thing I like about her approach is that it's very comprehensive, while still being fairly easy to follow...

I think her diet runs for 2 weeks, and then you start adding food back in to see what triggers a negative reaction.
http://www.google.com/url?sa=t&rct=j&q=doris%20rapp%20elimination%20diet&source=web&cd=3&cad=rja&sqi=2&ved=0CD0QFjAC&url=http%3A%2F%2Fnaturalanxietytherapy.com%2Fwp-content%2Fuploads%2F2009%2F06%2Fallergy-elimination-diet.pdf&ei=wNebULSLMo6c8QSel4CABg&usg=AFQjCNFYNkCANC6BPXvPfIWphgnBnz1NPg

meadd823
11-09-12, 06:15 AM
For those who were interested in the medication versus diet debate that portion has been split off this thread and moved here (http://www.addforums.com/forums/showthread.php?t=134812)

choco222
11-21-12, 05:56 AM
Well for those who wanted to know:) Like I said, I'm not trying to start an argument. This is just my personal experience. :)

I think it's important to eliminate as much as possible that could trigger the ADHD symptoms. If you only eliminate one thing at a time, even if that one thing impacts you negatively, you might not notice because you're still eating something else that's bad for you thus hindering any postive effect.

Well I started by cutting out gluten, dairy, all additives and preservatives, salicylates (feingold diet), and only eating organic. I did this for a month. At first I didn't think it was helping but once I starting reintroducing foods I noticed a difference.

I could eat corn, eggs, butter (the only dairy product I ate), quinoa (very healthy), all the fruits and veggies mentioned on the feingold diet (http://www.feingold.org/). I did eat very bland and simple. You have to always read labels and shopping becomes more expensive. Some people, however, react badly to corn, eggs, and butter. It's different for everyone.

For example, I might eat: a salad with lettuce, carrots, and dressing (equal amount lemon juice and organic sunflower oil) a potatoe, some chicken and some pumpkin soup. For sweets I ate a lot of sesame bars. Everything organic, as much as possible anyways.


After a month of this strict diet (I messed up once or twice so don't give up if you do :) ) I reintroduced one food item at a time. So for example, the first food I added back was dairy. I drank 1 or 2 glasses of milk and than again the next day and tried to study and it went horrible. I noticed my focus was much worse. After cutting dairy out again it took around 3 to 5 days for my focus to return. After reintroducing some additives my focus was gone for about 2 or 3 weeks. I almost gave up.

almost 3 months after starting the diet I'm still trying to figure it out. Partly why it's taking me so long is because I have a lot of exams at the moment, so I haven't really had much time to test reintroduced foods. Most likely though, the salicylates aren't affecting me. :) I also noticed that glutten makes me very very sluggish/tired.

Hope this helps :)I would definitely recommend trying it. Even if it's difficult, it's definitely worth it :)

qanda
11-21-12, 07:45 AM
The elimination diet I read about sounds similar to what you are trying. Those who say they have tried an elimination diet can NOT say it didn't work unless they have tried this severely restricted diet, where even foods we think of as healthy are eliminated.

The recent study, led by Lidy Plesser, Ph.D., of the ADHD Research Center in Eindhoven, was based on a restricted diet, which included rice, white meat, vegetables and fruit, and eliminated wheat, tomatoes, oranges, eggs and dairy. Diets were created for children between four and eight years old, and the plan was to consume the diet for five weeks. The control group was counseled on how to eat a “healthy diet,” but was not given the restricted diet of the main test group. When this first phase was complete, researchers determined that 78 percent of the children finishing the study (41 of the 50 original participants) did have fewer ADHD symptoms, and that reintroducing the foods increased the symptoms once again.

The second phase of the study tested the idea that eating foods often associated with allergies, i.e. high-IgG foods such as eggs and milk, would induce ADHD symptoms. However, researchers ultimately did not find that there was a link between the two.

mrs. dobbs
11-22-12, 05:24 AM
Elimination diets are awesome, the best thing I have done for myself.

I am currently trying to do baked goods even though I have eliminated dairy, eggs, gluten and sucrose. I am trying non-gluten flour, banana/applesauce, xylitol & margarine.

I can't afford organic food and I'm really feeling it. What's more, I've been eating lots of sausage over the past couple of days-- colorings, nitrates and nitrites, etc. And I am feeling pretty depressed.

I think I have a salicylate sensitivity so cut out tomato & orange but not lemon or peppers yet. Bananas made me feel crap the other day. Not sure why.