View Full Version : Question for people who have done Neurofeedback


babidi
12-30-12, 11:57 AM
I read that Neurofeedback is like playing a video game. Could someone describe the video game? What do you have to do during the video game?

Thanks for your time!

babidi
01-03-13, 07:50 PM
Anyone?

ToneTone
01-03-13, 08:03 PM
Just go out there and google neurofeedback and you'll find some information on it. Youtube probably has videos on it.

I haven't had it, but my psychologist/therapist was a long-time practitioner of neurofeedback and biofeedback with his clients.

Basically, you get wired up ... the electrodes to parts of your head brain and the electrodes picks up what your brain waves are like ....

The video game aspect is that you can be playing a game, could be a simple game, like getting a car up a hill ... the car will only move in the right direction if the machine picks up that you have shifted brain waves. So it's your brain waves controlling the game, not your hands.

So you get rewarded with forward movement of the car when you make the right shift in your brave waves.

So over time, you learn how to change and adjust your brave waves .... with the ultimate goal, I think, of being able to better control your attention and to be able to relax when you want to relax or get intense and focus when you need to focus, etc.

Hope that helps.

Tone

babidi
01-07-13, 08:39 AM
Just go out there and google neurofeedback and you'll find some information on it. Youtube probably has videos on it.

I haven't had it, but my psychologist/therapist was a long-time practitioner of neurofeedback and biofeedback with his clients.

Basically, you get wired up ... the electrodes to parts of your head brain and the electrodes picks up what your brain waves are like ....

The video game aspect is that you can be playing a game, could be a simple game, like getting a car up a hill ... the car will only move in the right direction if the machine picks up that you have shifted brain waves. So it's your brain waves controlling the game, not your hands.

So you get rewarded with forward movement of the car when you make the right shift in your brave waves.

So over time, you learn how to change and adjust your brave waves .... with the ultimate goal, I think, of being able to better control your attention and to be able to relax when you want to relax or get intense and focus when you need to focus, etc.

Hope that helps.

Tone

Thanks for your reply!

So how exactly do you make the car move in the right direction with your brain waves?

sarahsweets
01-07-13, 09:51 AM
Do these results even last? How can it be effective for adhd?

MatthewNFB
01-24-13, 06:18 PM
Hello there, I've been a NFB technician for the last four years, and have worked with a full range of clients and conditions. Some of the best success in the versatile industry has been done in the fields of ADD/ADHD, and with a great deal of research put fourth by Doctor Michael Thompson up in Canada. (An excellent resource to look up!)
The ability to manipulate brainwaves happens quite naturally over the course of 40 to 80 sessions, depending on your ability to perform, comfort, etc. It works on conditioning principles, and reward stimulus occurring in visual and auditory fields.
The feedback can occur in office, or you can rent equipment for a period of time so that you can perform the training at home. Sessions usually take place two times a week, though some practices offer more, and the session length ranges from 30-40 minutes.
Not all NFB practices begin with a QEEG, which is the full cap analysis for assessing the nature of ADD issues, among several other issues such as seizure disorders, autism, brain injury, and so on. Our practice favors it, as you can see before and after changes within the brain, as well as get a more effective training protocol to maximize your training. I've run across some practices that pull their protocols from books as opposed to comparing their brain maps to established databases, and I do not personally believe that the training is nearly as effective.

I hope that helps!

HappySad99
04-14-13, 06:14 PM
Is the effect lasting or o you need to go back after a year? Do you need to do it each year? What are the best biofeedback systems?

Sandy4957
04-14-13, 06:34 PM
You don't try to move the car.

You think about the things they tell you to focus on, and your brain trains itself.

So, for some exercises, they instruct you to picture color and textures.

Others, you imagine moving from side to side. Some people picture skiing. I pictured riding my horse and doing laterals...

I believe that the effects become permanent with enough sessions. It's very effective for PTSD. I did it for that, and would like to do more, but it's expensive, and time-consuming, and not covered by insurance.

dvdnvwls
04-14-13, 07:42 PM
Thanks for your reply!

So how exactly do you make the car move in the right direction with your brain waves?

The equipment detects what kind of waves your brain is producing. Every time your brain starts making more of the "good" kind of waves and less of the "not so good" kind, the car moves forward. Or something like that. Probably an imprecise answer but probably good enough to get the point. You're not steering anything, you're just making a better type of brain waves.

Sandy4957
04-14-13, 08:33 PM
Yes, to clarify my earlier post. You think about the things that they tell you to think about, and (at first), the car moves forward once in a while. When it does, you think, "Yeah!!!" and then you briefly TRY to move it forward, which doesn't work. Then you focus again on what they say to think about and BINGO, the car moves forward...

litterbuggy
05-01-13, 07:28 PM
This is one of my first posts, so hello, everyone!

Babidi, thanks for asking the question because it's what I came here to find out. And thanks to MatthewNFB for responding.

It sounds like neurofeedback is much like the zen meditation I became very good at a long time ago, except that it focuses on a spiritual state, not a functional one. My understanding is that instead of quieting brainwaves like zen does, neurofeedback for brain regulation disorders would help the brain to find the patterns that work to do certain kinds of tasks. Then, once you've found the pattern, you poke about trying to replicate it, and learn to find it faster, until you see the problem and your brain automatically goes into the pattern to solve the problem. If the task is the kind of thing you do everyday, like organizing and completing your chores or whatever, you'll use the training every day, which makes that a pretty permanent change. If it's something you never use, I don't imagine you'll keep the skill.

If that's how it works, it sounds pretty exciting. I'm recently diagnosed with ADHD and trying to keep my job as a government attorney. I don't make much money (cutbacks everywhere), but the office will probably help a little. Still, I don't want to hit them with a bunch of different things, many of which might not work.