View Full Version : Fastest Modem With "COPPER" Wiring?


ONLY DESTROYER
01-06-13, 09:40 PM
So, I live in a neighborhood with copper wiring. Fiber optics is definitely not coming to my neighborhood, I think my Dad even spoke to the electricians or something.

Please, I would appreciate an educated samaritan to inform me of how to optimize my modem/router using copper wiring?

I understand that you do not receive the optimum speed with copper wiring, but do today's modems top the copper wiring's capability out at a certain point?

Forgive me for not taking the time to comprehend or convert these metrics---I read that copper wiring only runs up to 3000 hertz. Well I cannot figure out how these hertz corresponds to GHz and Mbps. Trust me, I tried googling it. I kept receiving superfluous information that was too complex considering my minimal knowledge because unfortunately I am not a tech-smarty .

I currently have a Netgear 5 port 10/100mbps FS605. It is to my understanding that the modem is the major thing one should upgrade and one should NOT obtain a superior router than the modem?? BECAUSE it would not be beneficial unless you were planning on upgrading like the next year, right?

I mean, am I even getting all I can out of my current modem? I have never pinged the router/modem and altered the bandwidth settings, but I have read that doing such a task may improve the distance of wireless signal for Smartphones, laptops, ect. and also speed up one's entire internet speed.

Summary with New Hypothesis:

I noticed that even verizon fios's most expensive package for $84.99 says..."Up to 75Mbps download and up to 35Mbps. Isn't this robbery compared to the functionality of the modem I have now? (I feel like such a noob) Or is it that searching and streaming is a rate of speed far different than the upload and download speeds?


I have Comcast high-speed internet, is it normal to connect high speed internet into a phone jack if you do not have fiber optics?! There might be some sort of port we are using to make it compatible with today's technology, but I feel like there is a faster way. My Dad says, "it's copper wiring" and then rambles how we might not even be able to upgrade speeds with the wiring we have, it might not make a difference to get a new modem? But the modem is 3-4 years old....Oh AND I just remembered, I think I remember my dad saying something about it being hooked up with coaxial.


Does a cable modem mean that you need fios?

Here is an up to date modem, let me know how well I may have picked for a possible modem...http://www.amazon.com/Arris-DG860a/dp/B008O8B2NY/ref=sr_1_3?s=pc&ie=UTF8&qid=1357521632&sr=1-3&keywords=modem


I beg of any one of you readers, please...someone take the time to explain my predicament (which is mainly that I receive moderate connection in the xbox 360 game, halo 4 and wireless speeds are slow). I would appreciate it if someone explained all of my contingencies, but if you do not have the time, I beg that you please AT THE LEAST explain something that strikes your eye, or something that you are really acclimated to be able to inform me of my for the benefit of my uneducated self.

SweetCode
01-06-13, 10:59 PM
This question is a little more complex than it look but let's go, most speed limitations comes from the provider not from your own network, they offer "up to Xmbps" because the provider will have a X amounts of bandwith available all the time and since during office hours usually there's more people using and during night hours there's less people using the math is simple if they have 1000mbps available and 100 people using it will be 10mbps per person (minus the network overhead, the amount of bandwith used by routing equipments to handle the traffic) and if there is only 10 people using it it will be around 100mbps per person, so most of the time you network doesn't matter for the final speed.

Now let's move on considering that your provider is a good one and that there's 75mbps available all the time for you, the next steep is the distribution network , the network before your house between the company and the boxes on the street, the technology used usually have some limited distance that it can reach before the signal gets weak and with that the speed limit drops, so let's say that they're using a technology with a limit of 1 kilometer (sorry I am not american..) and they replicate the signal every 1km (for saving money in equipment), if your house is attached to a house near the 1km limit even having the 75mbps available the signal will be so weak near the 1km end that you'll not able to use it to the full capacity , there'll be packet losses and things like that slowying the process and adding overhead to the processing, so even having a gigabit internet will make you see lag when gaming online but will be able to do really fast downloads depending on the case there can be so much overhead that even the download will be slow.

In this case there's nothing that you can do either, so let's again move on and assume that your company is a good one and replicate their signal way before the technology limit.

Now in this situation you have a really nice link with 75mbps of download speed available in the cable coming inside your house, now what matters? well it depends if you are sharing the internet with other people or not, first to keep it simple lets assume that you are not , there's basically 3 equipments in your home for handling your network lets see how each can affect your network:

1- The modem

The job of the modem is transforming the digital network signal of your home network in whatever signal they use in the broadband company, for avoid it to affect the speed of your internet it needs to be able to "translate" this signal from every connection from your home network as fast as needed, so buying a high quality modem that has a good processor is the main step here, with a high quality equipment it will not loss quality when handling the huge overhead from tons of connections when you are using P2P or the massive traffic of HD movies being streamed.

2- The Wireless access point / Network Switch

After the signal being translated by the modem the access point is responsible to allowing to more than one equipment to use the connection , the same issue of the processing speed applies here , so look forward a high quality equipment , but there are also some other issues , the general ones are that a non-expert can look for are QoS
QoS: since they operate in a level far from eletricity and near computers they can see inside the packets going on the traffic of the network so they can have neat features like QoS , inside your switch/router/AP you can find the option to give priority for streaming packets allowing you to have a better experience on the internet.
If the equipment is a wireless one remember that the speed of the equipment can only be achieved in perfect conditions so if you are far from the equipment the speed will be lower , also try to keep electronics and water out of the way of the signal , since water affects the wireless signal strongly and other electronics can interfere with the signal too. also remembers the wifi logo? the lines getting bigger as far from the equipment? this is not only a design thing the signal "expand" in a 3d sphere from the point of origin so usually putting the equipment in a high position gets a better signal distribution than putting on the floor.

3- The computer/eletronic network interface.

The interface interface needs to be handling the conversion from eletronic pulses transmitted in the radio signal or in the wires of your home network into data inside the computer it doesn't matter if anything else is great if you have a cheap 54g wireless card, it'll not be able to handle the traffic , it will have slow chips and so on... in the case of 54g depending on the router it can actually slow down the whole network to allow the traffic to be handled by this single card, so the key here is again getting a good quality equipment from a good manufacturer, if it is wireless the same recommendation to avoid water and eletronics interferences applies.

So considering a more complex network where you share the connection with other people , try to check inside the Access Point/witch/modem(sometimes modems are Access Points or switchs too) for options to limit the speed that each one can get or to enable the QoS that I talked about before , if someone is using too much of the bandwith it will also affect everyone else , the equipment are usually pretty "dumb" so it will not care about "sharing the speed amount fairly" if it have to handles 10000 connections it will handle it the best that it cans , it will not care if 9999 are from a single user and the other connection is having to wait because of it.

Conclusion: Try to get the best equipment possible for your needs at each step , take a lot at the features from each equipment at their manual , and see if it can be used to help with your needs.

Hope it helps, any other doubt just ask here and if no one answer PM me and I come back to help.

ps.: Some good well known manufacturers are 3com , cisco (usually too expensive) , Linksys and if you have a lot of apple computers Apple network equipment is usually good... Networks aren't my expertise area so I can be really outdated when it comes to brands, but usually this four brands do really good equipment.

BellaVita
01-07-13, 01:23 AM
Wow, that's alot of smart stuff :p

ONLY DESTROYER
01-09-13, 10:16 PM
This question is a little more complex than it look but let's go, most speed limitations comes from the provider not from your own network, they offer "up to Xmbps" because the provider will have a X amounts of bandwith available all the time and since during office hours usually there's more people using and during night hours there's less people using the math is simple if they have 1000mbps available and 100 people using it will be 10mbps per person (minus the network overhead, the amount of bandwith used by routing equipments to handle the traffic) and if there is only 10 people using it it will be around 100mbps per person, so most of the time you network doesn't matter for the final speed.

Now let's move on considering that your provider is a good one and that there's 75mbps available all the time for you, the next steep is the distribution network , the network before your house between the company and the boxes on the street, the technology used usually have some limited distance that it can reach before the signal gets weak and with that the speed limit drops, so let's say that they're using a technology with a limit of 1 kilometer (sorry I am not american..) and they replicate the signal every 1km (for saving money in equipment), if your house is attached to a house near the 1km limit even having the 75mbps available the signal will be so weak near the 1km end that you'll not able to use it to the full capacity , there'll be packet losses and things like that slowying the process and adding overhead to the processing, so even having a gigabit internet will make you see lag when gaming online but will be able to do really fast downloads depending on the case there can be so much overhead that even the download will be slow.

In this case there's nothing that you can do either, so let's again move on and assume that your company is a good one and replicate their signal way before the technology limit.

Now in this situation you have a really nice link with 75mbps of download speed available in the cable coming inside your house, now what matters? well it depends if you are sharing the internet with other people or not, first to keep it simple lets assume that you are not , there's basically 3 equipments in your home for handling your network lets see how each can affect your network:

1- The modem

The job of the modem is transforming the digital network signal of your home network in whatever signal they use in the broadband company, for avoid it to affect the speed of your internet it needs to be able to "translate" this signal from every connection from your home network as fast as needed, so buying a high quality modem that has a good processor is the main step here, with a high quality equipment it will not loss quality when handling the huge overhead from tons of connections when you are using P2P or the massive traffic of HD movies being streamed.

2- The Wireless access point / Network Switch

After the signal being translated by the modem the access point is responsible to allowing to more than one equipment to use the connection , the same issue of the processing speed applies here , so look forward a high quality equipment , but there are also some other issues , the general ones are that a non-expert can look for are QoS
QoS: since they operate in a level far from eletricity and near computers they can see inside the packets going on the traffic of the network so they can have neat features like QoS , inside your switch/router/AP you can find the option to give priority for streaming packets allowing you to have a better experience on the internet.
If the equipment is a wireless one remember that the speed of the equipment can only be achieved in perfect conditions so if you are far from the equipment the speed will be lower , also try to keep electronics and water out of the way of the signal , since water affects the wireless signal strongly and other electronics can interfere with the signal too. also remembers the wifi logo? the lines getting bigger as far from the equipment? this is not only a design thing the signal "expand" in a 3d sphere from the point of origin so usually putting the equipment in a high position gets a better signal distribution than putting on the floor.

3- The computer/eletronic network interface.

The interface interface needs to be handling the conversion from eletronic pulses transmitted in the radio signal or in the wires of your home network into data inside the computer it doesn't matter if anything else is great if you have a cheap 54g wireless card, it'll not be able to handle the traffic , it will have slow chips and so on... in the case of 54g depending on the router it can actually slow down the whole network to allow the traffic to be handled by this single card, so the key here is again getting a good quality equipment from a good manufacturer, if it is wireless the same recommendation to avoid water and eletronics interferences applies.

So considering a more complex network where you share the connection with other people , try to check inside the Access Point/witch/modem(sometimes modems are Access Points or switchs too) for options to limit the speed that each one can get or to enable the QoS that I talked about before , if someone is using too much of the bandwith it will also affect everyone else , the equipment are usually pretty "dumb" so it will not care about "sharing the speed amount fairly" if it have to handles 10000 connections it will handle it the best that it cans , it will not care if 9999 are from a single user and the other connection is having to wait because of it.

Conclusion: Try to get the best equipment possible for your needs at each step , take a lot at the features from each equipment at their manual , and see if it can be used to help with your needs.

Hope it helps, any other doubt just ask here and if no one answer PM me and I come back to help.

ps.: Some good well known manufacturers are 3com , cisco (usually too expensive) , Linksys and if you have a lot of apple computers Apple network equipment is usually good... Networks aren't my expertise area so I can be really outdated when it comes to brands, but usually this four brands do really good equipment.

Something tells me I need to get some Vyvanse.
Lol, but on a more serious note I appreciate the considerate in-depth explanation hitting almost all of my contingencies spot on!
I am truly impressed!!
My mental process is lacking at the moment and I can only think of one question, If I think of something else tomorrow, hopefully you won't mind answering?

My Ethernet cord is 50ft long.
Could this length of the cord significantly affect connection?
Also, what about getting higher grade Ethernet cords?

SweetCode
01-25-13, 05:19 AM
50ft should not be a problem , but watch for things that can cause interference in the ethernet cord , lamps , AC/DC converters, power lines, electric engines(like in fans) and alikes.

Unless you REALLY need go near something causing interference a common network cable (Cat-5) is ok for 75mbps, if you need to go in a speed above 100mbps or need to go through something that can cause interference you should look for CAT 5e armored cables, remember that the common Ethernet cable is not really resistant so you should not fold it or leave it totally unprotected (it's better to make it go through a plastic tube or near a wall avoiding electric wires).

Feel free to ask :) , I just subscribed the thread.

ONLY DESTROYER
02-03-13, 04:12 PM
50ft should not be a problem , but watch for things that can cause interference in the ethernet cord , lamps , AC/DC converters, power lines, electric engines(like in fans) and alikes.

Unless you REALLY need go near something causing interference a common network cable (Cat-5) is ok for 75mbps, if you need to go in a speed above 100mbps or need to go through something that can cause interference you should look for CAT 5e armored cables, remember that the common Ethernet cable is not really resistant so you should not fold it or leave it totally unprotected (it's better to make it go through a plastic tube or near a wall avoiding electric wires).

Feel free to ask :) , I just subscribed the thread.

Thank you sir, you have been a wealth of information.

I just became aware that there is only one ethernet cord that comes from modem to router.

So my main internet ethernet cord that comes from the modem to the basement goes in the top port, then my ethernet cord for xbox live goes from router to the basement.

My one brother piles clothes in the shelf above the router and puts clothes hanging around it so he is not disturbed by the LED lights at night, which I believe can be turned off.

But I think the clothes and everything, that would only affect the wireless signal right?

I figured out that the main problem with my internet connectivity for the xbox though, my NAT was not open, I learned everything about router settings, lol...

My ping is 21ms and my laptop is plugged in a hotswitch that ones off of the router, so I am guessing connectivity is limited when you are splitting it from the router to a hotswitch (for extra ports). Not that my connection speed needs to be much better, just kind of curious, ya know?

So 21ms ping 23.24 Mbps download speed and 4.23Mbps upload speed.

I contacted my ISP and I get more than my contract...lol my ISP contract is entitled to 20Mbps download speed.

Lastly, switching from router to the hotswitch, I noticed my ping dropped. I used to be in the router and got 17ms ping all of the time. Now I seem to get 20ms+

SweetCode
02-04-13, 12:11 AM
Sounds like everything is great then,or do you consider 21ms too much? (I don't play any games so everything lower than 100ms is good enough)

Clothes will affect the signal but it shouldn't be a major problem, I have the same problem as you brother with the lights , I just covered them with some insulating tape.

Connection may be limited without NAT'ing with the switch (aren't hotswitchers a tv thing?), you should take a look at the manual on the subject "port forwarding" or if you are only using to use a single machine look for "DMZ".

But after 10 years working in IT , my suggestion is if everything is working and seems to be great , do not touch it. :lol:

As explained here:
http://imgs.xkcd.com/comics/success.png

Drewbacca
02-06-13, 02:57 AM
But after 10 years working in IT , my suggestion is if everything is working and seems to be great , do not touch it. :lol:


The benefit is rarely worth the effort, unless the effort is the reason for doing it. ;)

Laserbeak
08-29-14, 04:32 AM
It sounds like you're using DSL which does not involve a modulator/demodulator (modem), but rather a sort of router. (Yes I know everyone calls it that but everyone can be wrong sometimes!) A true modem turns data into a sound within the range of what a telephone is supposed to support and can be transmitted by regular voice telephone equipment point to point like any other voice phone call. DSL is just a copper link to your local telephone substation where it is picked up and then put on a digital system meant to carry computer data.

In my experience, cable is much more reliable and faster. I get like every HD channel, telephone service and a 110 Mbps Internet connection over my cable line that is just connected to a fiber optic trunk line in the basement of my apartment building.