View Full Version : SPECT,PET,brain images used to detect ADHD low dopamine levels?


VOltaire
01-15-13, 12:27 AM
This is still very cutting edge and not really endorsed by the vast majority of the medical community however it is interesting and may some day save patients the hassle of taking the wrong medications and improve therapy significantly!

Anyone have any thoughts? I know this has been used in pediatric patients with great success by a very select few doctors to identify violent and aggressive behavior in children.

sarahsweets
01-15-13, 05:19 AM
I have never seen any evidence that these scans have been able to highlight dopamine levels. Can you please cite a source?

VOltaire
01-15-13, 06:36 AM
I have never seen any evidence that these scans have been able to highlight dopamine levels. Can you please cite a source?
yes my dear, give me a few hours to dig up some literature from Johns Hopskins that were cited and referenced after thousands of scans by respected members of the medical community.

Amtram
01-15-13, 10:44 AM
This has already been discussed in this area many times. There is no scientific evidence that any electronic brain imaging is useful at this point for diagnosis of ADHD. Here (http://www.nimh.nih.gov/health/publications/neuroimaging-and-mental-illness-a-window-into-the-brain/neuroimaging-and-mental-illness-a-window-into-the-brain.shtml) is the rundown on what brain imaging can and can't do from the National Institutes of Health.

Currently, the only way to analyze neurotransmitter levels and synaptic efficiency involves taking the brain out of the head and slicing it into very thin pieces and analyzing each piece at a time. As such, it's not a viable diagnostic tool.

Dizfriz
01-15-13, 10:54 AM
This is still very cutting edge and not really endorsed by the vast majority of the medical community however it is interesting and may some day save patients the hassle of taking the wrong medications and improve therapy significantly!

Anyone have any thoughts? I know this has been used in pediatric patients with great success by a very select few doctors to identify violent and aggressive behavior in children.
If this were possible I suspect it would be in the somewhat distant future.

Right now, as I understand it, gene maps are considered as possible important indicators of which medications to try and the technology may be available in the fairly near future.

Dizfriz

Dizfriz
01-15-13, 10:56 AM
yes my dear, give me a few hours to dig up some literature from Johns Hopskins that were cited and referenced after thousands of scans by respected members of the medical community.
I am interested in this too and await your report.

Dizfriz

Dizfriz
01-15-13, 11:00 AM
Currently, the only way to analyze neurotransmitter levels and synaptic efficiency involves taking the brain out of the head and slicing it into very thin pieces and analyzing each piece at a time. As such, it's not a viable diagnostic tool.

It might help in diagnosis but it would have a major negative impact on the ability to prescribe medications for the individual. (grin)

Dizfriz

VOltaire
01-16-13, 06:23 PM
Have patience guys I am avidly tryi.g to locate information, I'd also like to state that it has been used in theory and never proven in medical science that it works!
These scans have helped detect frontal lobe masses that caused hysteria, agression, suicidal tendances, seratonin issues, adhd,add etc.in both pediatric and adult patients. These patients had been dismissed, written off,wrongly medicated and refused surgery by the vast majority of the medical community except a few surgeons who saw promising evidence by specialists.

I wanted to state for the record that this is still highly inconclusive but showspromisong but expensive! Research!