View Full Version : Reference Notes for "Scattered", by Gabor Mate M.D. (Introduction) Note (*1)


mildadhd
01-16-13, 07:22 PM
The analysis of ADD given in this book attempts to synthesize the findings of modern neuroscientific research,

developmental psychology,

family systems theory,

genetics and medical science.(*1)


-Gabor Mate M.D., Scattered, Introduction




Introduction Note (*1)


(*1)In the professional literature Stephen P. Hinshaw,

associate professor of psychology at the University of California,

Berkeley,

has been a distinctive voice,

suggesting the possibility of complex biological,

social,

and psychological interactions together forming the roots of ADD:

"Notions of complex causal pathways in which psychobiologic risk factors,

problematic family functioning,

and wider systems influences might combined to shape problems in attention regulation,

activity level modulation,

and response inhibition have been slow to gain acceptance."


(-Hinshaw, Attention Deficits and Hyperactivity in Children, ix.)



-Gabor Mate M.D., Scattered, Introduction




.

mildadhd
01-16-13, 07:28 PM
Stephen Hinshaw
Professor
Ph.D., University of California at Los Angeles
Stephen Hinshaw
Departmental Area(s): Clinical Science; Change, Plasticity & Development
Director: The Hinshaw Lab

Interests: Childhood behavior disorders, developmental psychopathology. Attention deficits and hyperactivity; aggressive behavior, peer relations, family interactions, and neuropsychological risk factors; psychosocial and pharmacological interventions for children with ADHD; process and outcome research in child interventions; assessment, diagnosis, and classification of child disorders; definitions of mental disorder; stigma associated with mental disorder.

(con't link)


http://psychology.berkeley.edu/facul.../shinshaw.html





Representative Publications
Hinshaw, S. P., Scheffler, R. M., Fulton, B., Aase, H., Banaschewski, T., Cheng, W., Holte, A., Levy, F., Mattos, P., Sadeh, A., Sergeant, J., Taylor, E., & Weiss, M. (2011). International variation in treatment procedures for attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder: Social context and recent trends. Psychiatric Services, online.

Miller, M., & Hinshaw, S. P. (2010). Does childhood executive function predict adolescent functional outcomes in girls with ADHD? Journal of Abnormal Child Psychology, 38, 315-326.

Hinshaw, S. P., with Kranz, R. (2009). The Triple Bind: Saving our teenage girls from today's pressures. New York: Random House/Ballantine.

Owens, E. B., Hinshaw, S. P., Lee, S. S., & Lahey, B. B. (2009). Few girls with childhood attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder show positive adjustment during adolescence. Journal of Clinical Child and Adolescent Psychology, 38, 1-12.

Beauchaine, T. P., & Hinshaw, S. P. (Eds.). (2008). Child and adolescent psychopathology. Hoboken, NJ: Wiley.

Hinshaw, S. P., & Stier, A. (2008). Stigma in relation to mental disorders. Annual Review of Clinical Psychology, 4, 269-293.

Mikami, A. Y., Hinshaw, S. P., Patterson, K. A., & Lee, J. C. (2008). Eating pathology among adolescent girls with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder. Journal of Abnormal Psychology, 117, 225-235.

Hinshaw, S. P. (2007). The mark of shame: Stigma of mental illness and an agenda for change. New York: Oxford University Press.

Hinshaw, S. P., Owens, E. B., Sami, N., & Fargeon, S. (2006). Prospective follow-up of girls with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder into adolescence: Evidence for continuing cross-domain impairment. Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology, 74, 489-499.

Hinshaw, S. P. (2002). Preadolescent girls with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder: I. Background characteristics, comorbidity, cognitive and social functioning, and parenting practices. Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology, 70, 1086-1098.

Hinshaw, S. P., Carte, E. T., Sami, N., Treuting, J. J., & Zupan, B. A. (2002). Preadolescent girls with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder: II. Neuropsychological performance in relation to subtypes and individual classification. Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology, 70, 1099-1111.

Hinshaw, S. P., Owens, E. B., Wells, K. C., Kraemer, H. C., Abikoff, H. B., Arnold, L. E., et al. (2000). Family processes and treatment outcome in the MTA: Negative/ineffective parenting practices in relation to multimodal treatment. Journal of Abnormal Child Psychology, 28, 555-568.

mildadhd
01-16-13, 08:19 PM
Sorry the link in post #2,

is not available anymore,

Here is a new link.


Stephen HINSHAW


Research Interests:
Childhood behavior disorders, developmental psychopathology. Attention deficits and hyperactivity; aggressive behavior, peer relations, family interactions, and neuropsychological risk factors; psychosocial and pharmacological interventions for children with ADHD; process and outcome research in child interventions; assessment, diagnosis, and classification of child disorders; definitions of mental disorder; stigma associated with mental disorder.

Research Areas:
Change, Plasticity & Development
Clinical Science

(Continued see link below.)


http://psychology.berkeley.edu/people/stephen-hinshaw





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mildadhd
01-16-13, 09:29 PM
Citation
Database: PsycARTICLES
[ Journal Article ]

Prospective follow-up of girls with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder into early adulthood: Continuing impairment includes elevated risk for suicide attempts and self-injury.
Hinshaw, Stephen P.; Owens, Elizabeth B.; Zalecki, Christine; Huggins, Suzanne Perrigue; Montenegro-Nevado, Adriana J.; Schrodek, Emily; Swanson, Erika N.
Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology, Vol 80(6), Dec 2012, 1041-1051. doi: 10.1037/a0029451


Abstract

Objective: We performed a 10-year prospective follow-up of a childhood-ascertained (6–12 years), ethnically and socioeconomically diverse sample of girls with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD; N = 140: combined type [ADHD-C] n = 93; inattentive type [ADHD-I] n = 47) plus a matched comparison group (N = 88). Girls were recruited from schools, mental health centers, pediatric practices, and via advertisements; extensive evaluations confirmed ADHD versus comparison status. Method: Ten-year outcomes (age range 17–24 years; retention rate = 95%) included symptoms (ADHD, externalizing, internalizing), substance use, eating pathology, self-perceptions, functional impairment (global, academic, service utilization), self-harm (suicide attempts, self-injury), and driving behavior. Results: Participants with childhood-diagnosed ADHD continued to display higher rates of ADHD and comorbid symptoms, showed more serious impairment (both global and specific), and had higher rates of suicide attempts and self-injury than the comparison sample, with effect sizes from medium to very large; yet the groups did not differ significantly in terms of eating pathology, substance use, or driving behavior. ADHD-C and ADHD-I types rarely differed significantly, except for suicide attempts and self-injury, which were highly concentrated in ADHD-C. Domains of externalizing behavior, global impairment, service utilization, and self-harm (self-injury and suicide attempts) survived stringent control of crucial childhood covariates (age, demographics, comorbidities, IQ). Conclusions: Girls with childhood ADHD maintain marked impairment by early adulthood, spreading from symptoms to risk for serious self-harm. Our future research addresses the viability of different diagnostic conceptions of adult ADHD and their linkages with core life impairments. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2012 APA, all rights reserved)


http://psycnet.apa.org/journals/ccp/80/6/1041/



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mildadhd
01-17-13, 12:06 AM
Introduction

Attention deficit disorder is usually explained as the result of bad genes by those who "believe" in it,

and as the product of bad parenting by those who don't.

The aura of confusion and even acrimony that surrounds public debate about the condition discourages a reasoned discussion of how environment and heredity might

mutually affect the neurophysiology of children growing up in stressed families,

in a fragmented and highly pressured society and in culture that seems more frenzied as we approach the turn of the millennium.

I have attention deficit disorder myself,

and my three children have also been diagnosed with ADD.

I do not think it is a matter of bad genes or bad parenting,

but I do believe it is a matter of genes and parenting.

Neuroscience has established that the human brain is not programmed by biological heredity alone,

that its circuits are shaped by what happens after the infant enters the world,

and even while it is in the uterus.

The emotional states of the parents and how they live their lives have a major impact on the formation of their children's brains,

though parents cannot often know or control such subtle unconscious influences.

The good news is that major changes in the circuits of the brain can occur in the child and even in the adult if the conditions necessary for positive development are created.

Quick to arise whenever the environment is mentioned is the question of blame.

"You mean it's the parents' fault?" people immediately ask.

It is a simplistic notion that if something is wrong,

someone has to be at fault.

It would not help parents of children with ADD, besieged on all sides by the incomprehending judgments and criticality of friends,

family,

neighbors,

teachers and even strangers in the street,

to have yet one more finger pointed at them.

This book does not do so.


A doctor in Ontario gave the father of a nine-year-old girl with attention deficit disorder a dramatically apt analogy.

Imagine,

he said,

you're standing in the middle of a really crowded room.

Everyone around you is talking.

Suddenly someone asks,

you,

"What did so -and -so just say?"

That's what it's like inside the ADD brain and how it is for your child.

A parrallel analogy suits the situation the parents of ADD children find themselves in:

you're stuck in the middle of heavy traffic at an intersection;

the engine has stalled and you are trying your best to get moving.

Everyone is yelling and honking angrily at you,

but no one offers to help.

Perhaps no one knows how to.

As parents who make every effort we can to raise our children in loving security,

we do not need to feel more guilt than we already do.

We need less guilt and more awareness of how the quality of the parents-child relationship can be used to promote our children's emotional and cognitive development.

Scattered Minds is written to encourage such awareness.

The book is written also with two other sets of readers in mind.

My hope is that adults with attention deficit disorder will find insights here that will help them gain a deeper understanding of themselves and of the path they could take

toward their own healing.

Scattered Minds is meant also to give health professionals with ADD clients and teachers working with ADD students a comprehensive view of a much understood condition.


-Gabor Mate M.D., Scattered, Introduction


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