View Full Version : Therapy


ebullient
02-02-13, 06:31 PM
Hey guys.
My question is that I hate the idea of getting a therapist. I have a pdoc (who I love, and I've been doing very well with him.)- and he said lots of BP people benefit from therapy- I don't want to leave a stone unturned but even though I want to be a therapist (irony?) How do you find a good one. I am not very touchy feely. I never share my feelings. (ideas? yes. Feeling, almost never)

TLDR
I was diagnosed 2 years ago with this. I was seeing a therapist and I went to him right in the middle of my first HUGE mania. A LOT of stuff was off. I had been to him a few times before and he had diagnosed me with ADHD- but I think it was just the precursor to BP.
Anyway, I was doing crazy stuff, horrible stuff. But, I can sound extremely rational and intelligent in therapy. He totally missed my GINORMOUS mania which the emergency room got the slightest whiff of and sent me to a hospital. He is a very renown doctor, perhaps the most popular in the closer big town- works with grad students at the local university.





I guess I am just very scared that something will go the wrong way. I can't afford that. Control issues much? :)
:confused:

sarahsweets
02-10-13, 09:38 AM
Finding a good therapist is like interviewing a potenial employee.... you may have to bounce around from one to another until something clicks. I know alot of people think therapy for mental illnesses is a waste but I think the entire world would benefit from some therapy. People without a mental illness are sometimes more f**ked up then those of us who have a mental illness.

keliza
02-10-13, 09:01 PM
Therapy is a huge component of overall wellness with bipolar disorder, I strongly recommend it for everyone with a bipolar disorder dx, at least to start. Maybe once you're stable for a while you cut down your visits to just dropping in once a month to keep tabs on how things are going, but it's a really important part of wellness when you live with a chronic mental illness.

Just because one didn't work doesn't mean another won't work for you. I went through 6 therapists before I found one I truly clicked with, and she saved my life more than once. It was well worth the years of bouncing in and out of various therapists' offices for me to finally find the one who helped me get my life back. So you might go through several therapists before you find the right one, but when you do, it will be worth the struggle. Working with the right therapist is one of the best things you can do for yourself - it's a journey that you will reap the benefits from for the rest of your life.

As far as HOW you find the right one, like I said, it's trial and error. You meet with them and see what the chemistry is like. You might give it a few sessions to see how you click. If it seems like a good fit, you keep going. If not, you tell them that it doesn't feel like a good fit for you, and try someone else. The last therapist I had before my current one offered to help me find a therapist who she thought might be a better fit for me than herself, and she actually made a really good call on that. She knew SHE wasn't the right one for me, but she could tell based on my personality who in the community I might work better with. She was right, my therapist now is awesome, and I'm glad she recommended her to me.

dvdnvwls
02-10-13, 10:03 PM
CBT (Cognitive Behavioural Therapy) is a style famous for not being touchy-feely, and for sticking with ideas and actions instead (the actions being the most important part). When done by a therapist who really knows ADHD and how to handle it, it can be very helpful. It can also be extremely unhelpful, if a particular therapist turns out not to really know how to deal with ADHD. If you can find someone who combines ADHD savvy with a CBT orientation, you might find yourself a good fit. (And if you hate touchy-feely and never want to go there, you should definitely explore CBT as one of your options for your own practice later.)

Fuzzy12
02-11-13, 09:13 AM
I've tried counselling (talk therapy) but didn't find it helpful at all. I had a few sessions of CBT, which I thought was definitely more helpful but I think it depends on the individual.

It can take time to find not only a capable therapist but also someone with whom you are comfortable with. Maybe you could speak to a few in your area over the phone to get a feel for their ideas or attitude. You can also ask about their credentials, qualifications, interests and the areas they specialise in.

MadArtist
02-25-13, 06:18 PM
The major problem with therapists is you have to really test them out before you find one that seems in sync with you, which takes time and money. I've known a lot of people with varying problems that have benefited greatly from therapy, group therapy, or the Cognitive Behavioral Therapy mentioned above.

With bipolar you experience a lot in short amounts of time and sometimes you can't figure out why one day you reacted one way and another the next to the same thing or where any triggers might be if you have them. So talking it out with someone who can help you pick apart the complications and de-tangle them can help.

Unfortunately I've never benefited from therapy mainly because I get tired of talking about the same subjects over and over as there are certain things from my life people enjoy exploring. I've also had therapists who have felt it was their duty to boss me around, demand I do x before next session or they'd be mad with me.

Honestly you never know until you try. It's less complicated than altering your medication and some people just find it really soothing to have someone to talk to and know they can't really judge you.

SquarePeg
02-26-13, 04:09 AM
I can remember my brother seeing an emergency p.doc and sounding perfectly coherent and sane, so they let him go home. Big mistake.

Aside from that, I do recommend therapy. I had 2 years of psychotherapy with a great person, but know that in the UK this would never be offered again, way too expensive, drugs are cheaper. She never forced me to talk about anything I didnīt want to, she never pressured me, in fact she did very little talking, more direction I guess.

I went to her because I was suicidal, I wanted so many answers, why am I like this, why did my mother do or didnīt do such and such.
I didnīt find out all the answers but the important thing was that I didnīt need to know them anymore, the answers became unimportant.
The most important thing was the acknowledgement of how I was really feeling, all those deep buried feelings that masqueraded as anger, bulimia etc.

My daughter who is 17 has been seeing a psychologist. She went for 8 months, he helped her a lot even though she found it very hard going. Since then she has been able to talk about how she is feeling a lot more, instead of hiding it and pretending she feels ok.

She told me the other day that she considered herself lucky in that she has a stable home life, both parents together BUT, in spite of that how come she has so many "mental" problems.

MadArtist
02-26-13, 04:55 AM
She told me the other day that she considered herself lucky in that she has a stable home life, both parents together BUT, in spite of that how come she has so many "mental" problems.

Just tell her that many mental disorders don't need a reason to be there. Some things are genetic, some just show up at certain points in life. Your environment doesn't always impact your mental well-being.

And at the same time there's no shame in having those problems. She's lucky to have the support she does and the ability to get help. With all that she can lead a life like everyone else.

SquarePeg
02-26-13, 05:00 AM
Just tell her that many mental disorders don't need a reason to be there. Some things are genetic, some just show up at certain points in life. Your environment doesn't always impact your mental well-being.

And at the same time there's no shame in having those problems. She's lucky to have the support she does and the ability to get help. With all that she can lead a life like everyone else.
yes whilst you are correct, I do harbour some guilty feelings as mental illnesses are in my family, and regardless of the fact that me and her father are together, the move to Spain and his absences through work plus the fact that I think we are both a little crazy hasnīt helped her situation.
I also missed a lot of childhood signs in both her and her brother because of my undiagnosed adhd, I was so vague all the time and found her hard to cope with.

MadArtist
02-26-13, 05:09 AM
yes whilst you are correct, I do harbour some guilty feelings as mental illnesses are in my family, and regardless of the fact that me and her father are together, the move to Spain and his absences through work plus the fact that I think we are both a little crazy hasnīt helped her situation.
I also missed a lot of childhood signs in both her and her brother because of my undiagnosed adhd, I was so vague all the time and found her hard to cope with.

To be honest the only thing that matters is that you're there for her now and you both are aware of what's wrong and how to treat or fix it.

But I understand your mindset, my mother feels the same way. My parents divorced when I was 6 and my dad abused me and she didn't know until I was 18 when I was admitted to a psychiatric hospital for the first time. She beats herself up that she was blind to signs that weren't very obvious and regrets not doing something sooner to help me not only with that issue but the genetic mental problems I had as well.

I tell her the same thing I told you because to me the past is what it is and I'm just glad that now I'm getting the help I need. You'd be surprised how many people don't get help until they're in their 40s and they've all told me I was lucky to notice there was a problem and to get help while I was still young and that I had my mother's support even if she doesn't fully understand everything that's wrong.