View Full Version : Meditation helping tons so far, 3+ weeks


emily848
02-06-13, 04:19 PM
I just found the "meditation & spirituality" section of the forums here, so I thought I should copy a post I made in another area here. I'm surprised there isn't more activity in this section of the forum as I have recently found meditation to be amazingly helpful as described below

I started researching meditation using a book called "The Attention Revolution: Unlocking the Power of the Focused Mind". It's not intended for people with ADHD, though he does mention that it can help those afflicted. He doesn't seem to understand ADHD, though, saying that it can bring someone with ADHD up to a "normal" level of ability to focus. Since ADHD is not about being "deficit" but just out of control, I am hopeful that it could actually bring me to a superior level of attentional abilities compared to a "normal" person. Imagine being able to control hyperfocusing!

That book is about "Shamatha" meditation which is specifically for increasing the powers of attention. He talks about 10 stages of developing attention, but warns that only the first 3 stages can be achieved without dedicating substantial time to it through extended retreats. He recommends starting with 24 minutes a day. I was doing 36 minutes a day, recently moved to 42 minutes, and plan to go up about 6 minutes a week until I'm up to an hour at a time. I'm trying to do it every day, but it's been six days a week.

1st stage: concentrate on the feelings of breath in the entire body. When you can do that for a few seconds at a time, you've achieved the 1st stage.

2nd stage: concentrate on the belly moving up & down only (so narrowing focus). When you can do that for a full minute, you've achieved the 2nd stage.

3rd stage: concentrate on the feeling of the breath through the nostrils & on the upper lip (so focusing on a more subtle object of attention). When you can consistently do that for almost the entire session, you've achieved the 3rd stage.

I'm working on stage 3, so haven't read ahead to stages 4-10 yet.

I began to see significant changes after the first week, and the benefits have only increased. I'll list some below.

* Getting to work on time! Versus before being 30-60 minutes late. I've been 5-10 minutes late the last couple of weeks, and this week so far have been right on time. I'm really happy about that.

* Preparing meals! I felt too rushed and scatterbrained for that before and would have take-out, frozen food, canned food, or other pre-prepared food like top ramen 99 meals out of 100. Now I'm cooking simple, healthy meals (and doing the accompanying grocery shopping).

* Regular showers! OK, maybe gross to some people, but my whole life it has been a huge effort to shower regularly. I try to do it every other day, but would often go 3-4 days (like shower Wednesday and not again until Saturday or Sunday). Now it's no problem to shower every other day (I know most people do it every day, but every other day I think is acceptable).

* Cleaning up around the house! I was amazed to notice that the big pile of dirty dishes that is always next to the sink is going down. I'll just wash dishes if I have a few extra minutes, it's not even a strain. Compared to waiting for a bunch to pile up and committing one day to "chipping away at it." Also other general household chores. I just do them without anxiety.

* Feeling relaxed almost all the time! Before, I always felt in a rush to do something else (even though there's not anything else to do). Now I'm just relaxed and in the moment. Still harder in my cubicle at work (like now), but overall in my life I can run errands all day and be relaxed throughout it and at the end of the day.

* Working on creative projects without obsessing over them! I can spend a half hour or an hour on something that I'm not hyperfocusing on where before I needed to be totally obsessing about something to get it done at all. I have worked on several projects in a relaxed way that have been sitting around for years.

* No self medication! I won't get into details, but have been able to accomplish all of the above without the use of any substances where before I needed some kind of help just to tread water on the above responsibilities. Now I'm not just treading water, but full on swimming with a smile on my face (metaphorically speaking).

I can't believe the dramatic changes it has made to my life after just a few weeks and it makes me wonder what else meditation can accomplish. I'm looking into Vipassana meditation now and look forward to additional explorations.

I've found out meditation isn't easy. It's not about relaxing, but about practicing a relaxed focus. Staying in one position for an extended period can be painful, but I'm working on strengthening and stretching to make that more comfortable. I'm finding that if I sit in full lotus (on a meditation cushion), my back doesn't hurt but the sides of my ankles hurt quite badly. Other variations on a cross-legged position cause pain to my upper back. With time and practice I should get strong enough in the affected areas so that the pain is minimal or nil. I'm also reading "Beyond the Breath" by Marshall Glickman and he has a couple tips for relaxing into and through the pain in order to eliminate it. It's been helpful.

Of course, I'm worried that I may be hyperfocusing around meditation right now and may lose momentum after a few months, but I've never had anything provide such a tangible improvement to my life, so I am really hoping that it continues, and as long as I'm getting the positive reinforcement of all of these benefits, I should be able to continue practicing it.
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Bluerose
02-07-13, 03:09 AM
I too enjoy this section and wish there was more activity here.

Sounds like you have it down. The important thing is to keep it going. After the initial 'feel good factor' begins to wear off, it's easy to think we have 'fixed' something (like taking and then stopping meds because we feel better). Keeping a journal will help to remind you of why you do it and how it makes you feel.

.

GeordieDave
02-07-13, 04:49 AM
Hi, I have been thinking about starting some meditation as I have ehard and also read a lot that it does work for many different things. Mentally and physically. do you meditate whilst on medication or not?

Bluerose
02-07-13, 11:24 AM
You can. Start off with having a five or ten minute quiet time and progress from there. It’s not as easy as it sound but stick with it as it gets easier.

emily848
02-07-13, 01:14 PM
I'm not taking medication, but I don't see any reason you couldn't do both. I was just diagnosed 10/31/12 after being misdiagnosed with BiPolar II disorder in Dec-2008. I took Adderall for a couple of months, but it stopped working, so I quit it. My negative experiences with trying a number of ineffective medications for BP II discouraged me from starting back on that path, so I decided to look into non-medication treatments which is what brought me to meditation.

Making notes here & sharing with friends and family how much it's helping me is my way of reminding myself to keep doing it. I had my first negative meditation session last night (instead of feeling light afterwards, felt very heavy). I'm looking at it as progress: bringing negative emotions to the surface so that they can be released. Buddhism teaches that if you don't resist negative emotions (or pain), but explore the feeling objectively, the negativity (or pain) will naturally dissipate.

It's not easy at all! When I first started and my thoughts would bounce around, I kept telling myself: "That's not what you're doing RIGHT NOW," and bring myself back to concentrating on my breath. The "right now" is really helpful.

GeordieDave
02-07-13, 01:20 PM
Thanks for you replies. Shall I just start learning alone or are their any classes I can start going to first to learn? What's the best way of getting into it? Just sitting down and learning how to control you're breathing etc.. ?

emily848
02-07-13, 01:49 PM
No, it's not about controlling your breathing, just paying attention to it. Start with three deep breaths, feel the breath going from your belly all the way up your chest. Then just breath naturally and keep your attention focused on your breath and the feeling of your breath throughout your body. It's important not to put any expectations on your breath, just experience it as it comes. Think of it as exercising your "attention muscle." You can try doing it lying down, that's the most comfortable, but because of that can also be harder to stay focused (easier to drift, daydream, or even fall asleep). You want to be in a position of relaxed attention, so it's a balancing act. I've seen some warnings against doing it alone because heavy emotions can be released and you may need guidance for handling that, but I think it's fine to start out on your own and see how it goes.

String
02-07-13, 02:19 PM
Thanks for starting this post. I was doing some mindfulness at the beginning of last year, and it helped a ton, but then I moved offices and was in a less private situation and found it a harder to take those breaks. I ended up completely stopping. Last fall I started trying to meditate again, but never could get into any habits.

Anyway, to make a long story short, I started to get back on medication last month, but my anxiety was so bad before taking the medication that it was just giving me even worse anxiety problems. I didn't even really understand what was happening until my doctor helped guide me a bit to focus on anxiety instead of ADHD symptoms. Anyway, because of the anxiety, the medication isn't helping like it should.

My doctor has just prescribed, literally, meditation at least a few times a day. Cool doctor. But I'm going to need to figure this stuff out better and get it back in my life.

emily848
02-07-13, 03:05 PM
Good luck, I'd be very interested to hear about others' progress. In one meditation book I read ("Beyond the Breath" by Marshall Glickman), he says he got noise muffling headphones so that he could meditate in a small house with thin walls while his teenagers were playing music.

That's awesome that your doctor went there. I've only had psychiatrists who seemingly randomly prescribe medications and then are baffled when I have side effects or other issues.

emily848
02-07-13, 05:52 PM
They're called "ear muffs" when it's just for noise cancelling. I was having a hard time searching for them until I figured that out, so wanted to clarify in case anyone else was having the same problem. I bought a pair for me & another for my 11-yr-old nephew who has ADHD and a lot of trouble doing homework because of his 6 & 3-yr-old noisy little brothers.

emily848
02-16-13, 01:35 AM
Update: 1st, the ear muffs came today and are disappointingly ineffective. Oh well. They're supposedly the highest muffling rating at 30 NRR. Luckily, my home is pretty quiet, but it is unfortunate for my nephew's homework situation.

Back to the meditation: It got a lot harder this week! But still the same benefits. I've gone back to "stage 2" (focusig on the feeling of my breath in my belly). I've nudged up to 46 minutes a session (most days). I think it's gotten harder because I'm not hyperfocusing over meditation anymore. So it's actually a good sign that it's still helping and I'm still doing it even though it doesn't have that special excitement of hyperfocusing :)

pudge72
02-21-13, 02:57 PM
I bought the book that emily848 has been using for her meditation. I've had it for a little over a week, and I'm up to stage 2. It has been quite beneficial, even though I can't say I've had as dramatically positive results as emily848. I've only been doing it for a short while, so fingers crossed.

It seems like the first three stages laid out in the book are not all that different from standard mindfulness techniques (like the ones laid out by Jon Kabat Zinn). But they do seem to be laying the groundwork for stages 4 through 10, where the unique "focusing of the mind" aspects of Shamatha meditation take central stage.

I'm going to keep at it. I thought it would be extremely tedious to get through 24 minutes of meditation, but it's amazing how quickly the time passes. And if nothing else, I do feel the turbulence of my mind substantially subsiding while I'm meditating, and for a short period afterwards. Hopefully that period of calm will grow longer as I continue to do this.

String
02-21-13, 04:19 PM
Well, I guess I can report that I'm moving forward with meditation, too. But slowly. On most days my meditation is just a few minutes of mindfulness, focusing on each of my senses. I almost feel that those little sessions don't count when I hear about 46 minute sessions.

I've had a few days that I've been able to do more (a couple of guided meditations and a couple of sessions on my own). Some of them have felt very good. Those few sessions might not have been 46 minutes total when combined, but I do think it counts as meditation. And I do feel benefits.

My anxiety has gotten quite a bit better over the last couple of weeks. I directly attribute it to my efforts with meditation. And less anxiety helps all areas of my life, including a small amount of help with ADHD symptoms.

goodtimesahead
02-22-13, 01:20 PM
I have tried a lot of meditation and have seen amazing benefits in managing ADHD. I have previously posted a message which describes my experience of Kundalini Yoga.

A meditation which I found beneficial is left nostril breathing. You simply block your right nostril and through the left inhale for 10 seconds, hold for 10 seconds and exhale for 10 seconds. Try get this practice up to 11 mins. Once you are comfortable with the breathing pattern try increase the intervals to 15 secs and then to 20 secs. From practicing this meditation regularly, you will find it easier to listen and retain what other people say, also you will be less prone to reacting to the words of others.


From my experience it is fine to do meditation whilst on medication.

goodtimesahead
02-22-13, 01:21 PM
@emily848 - So happy to read this story. I hope this inspires others to try meditation and yoga in managing ADHD.

emily848
02-25-13, 03:13 PM
I'm on six weeks now, and have crept up to 48 minute sessions. I think working up to 24 minutes a day is a good enough goal though; I tend to go overboard with everything I do. I told my partner that if I start slacking off to help me stay on track with doing at least 24 minutes a day.

I'm planning on going on a 10-day retreat at the beginning of June because I'm curious what effect that would have and would like to explore meditation further in that kind of environment.

I think I was seeing more significant results the first few weeks because I was hyperfocusing around meditation and that enabled me to go to a deeper level of concentration.

I am still seeing significant improvements in all the areas I listed above, but not quite as relaxed throughout the day as I was after the first couple of weeks. I am hopeful that I'll get back there with continued efforts. I am reading several different books on Buddhism and on meditation and am finding the style of thinking very helpful in terms of not having an immediate emotional reaction to things and also with staying in and appreciating the present moment.

For example, I tend to get irritable on the phone, so I taped a quote on my phone at work: "Words can travel thousands of miles/ May my words create mutual understanding and love/ May they be as beautiful as gems,/ As lovely as flowers" (Thich Nhat Hanh). I'm trying!

goodtimesahead
02-26-13, 07:40 AM
@emily848 - Thanks for the nice quote. I have noted down in my list of inspirational quotes.

Having attended yoga retreats myself, i would definitely recommend a retreat experience to enhance your meditative practice further. Retreats allow you to shut yourself completely off from the noise of day to day life and go deeper into yourself. You will return refreshed with greater clarity and focus.

ana futura
03-03-13, 04:09 PM
For example, I tend to get irritable on the phone, so I taped a quote on my phone at work: "Words can travel thousands of miles/ May my words create mutual understanding and love/ May they be as beautiful as gems,/ As lovely as flowers" (Thich Nhat Hanh). I'm trying!

Thich Nhat Hanh's books have helped me tremendously with learning how to navigate and accept my ADHD (and my life).

When I was first exposed to him I was very skeptical- "Who is this syrupy, saccharine monk fellow?" It was hard for me to accept the profundity of such simple, "trite" concepts.

Now I find that his words just penetrate my very being- They connect with me. I can "feel" the concepts behind them.

ConcertaParent
03-03-13, 11:38 PM
Which Hanh book was the easiest to do mindfulness with? My family is watching his "Mindful Living Every Day" DVD but I don't know see an easy way to get my child (and us parents) to do mindfulness exercises. She doesn't like her yoga class.
Thich Nhat Hanh's books have helped me tremendously with learning how to navigate and accept my ADHD (and my life).

ana futura
03-04-13, 12:07 AM
Which Hanh book was the easiest to do mindfulness with? My family is watching his "Mindful Living Every Day" DVD but I don't know see an easy way to get my child (and us parents) to do mindfulness exercises. She doesn't like her yoga class.

I really like The Sun My Heart. But John Kabat Zinn or Lidia Zylowska might be a better choice for learning mindfulness techniques.

Do you think your daughter would like something like Karate?

If had tried to get me into sitting meditation, mindfulness, or yoga as a child I don't think I would have liked it either. I came to yoga on my own when I was 18, but prior to that I don't think you could have paid me.

I did martial arts as a youth though, and I loved it. I think my experiences with martial arts paved the way to embracing mindfulness practice later in life. I also think it really helped with my motivation, self esteem, and self awareness.

She might just have too much energy right now. Something like karate will give her an outlet, but it also involves a lot of the principles that underpin meditative practice.

emily848
03-11-13, 03:23 PM
8 week update: After working up to one 50 minute session a day, I changed this past week to two 24 minute sessions. I'm finding it helpful to do a session in the morning. Would like to go back up to longer sessions again, so probably will get back there.

I'm still looking forward to doing a 10-day retreat starting 5/29 even though my place isn't assured yet (they need to find a teacher and then confirm with the teacher that they are comfortable with someone with ADHD; they have a spot reserved for me right now though).

I also got some Kundalini Yoga DVD's (chakra series by Maya Fiennes). They just came last Thursday and I did a session both Saturday and Sunday. It was a lot of fun. My neck is stiff today, but not too bad. I'm not finding it as centering and calming as the straight meditation, but it feels good and healthy and I plan to continue hopefully every day, but at least on the weekends (can get busy during the week).

goodtimesahead
03-18-13, 06:18 AM
@emily848 - Good to hear you decided to give Kundalini Yoga a try. Hope you can keep up with it to realise life changing benefits. For ADHD, I have found the navel chakra exercises to be most beneficial since this area is about your energy, discipline and determination.

Kundalini Yoga kriyas (exercises set) can be physically intensive so they may not feel so grounding. However, they are very powerful and prepare you well to go very deep into meditation. Its best to take 5-10mins relaxation (laying flat on your back) after a kriya and then try a meditation of your choice.

emily848
05-03-13, 07:20 PM
3-1/2 month update:

Seeing a definite corellation between keeping up on meditation and managing my ADHD symptoms.

I'm not as good now at doing it every day, but since it's hard for me to keep consistent habits in general, that's not surprising. I'm not being regular about it. I might do 60 minutes one day, then 12-24 minutes the next day, then miss 4-5 days, or I might do 36 minutes three days in a row, or 24 minutes five days in a row. It's kind of all over the place.

I was accepted into a 10-day meditation retreat (5/29-6/9). At the time I was applying to it, I was thinking that having that as a goal would inspire me to do longer sessions and keep up on it on a regular basis. It worked for awhile, but now I'm kind of using it as an excuse to slip: "it's okay if I'm not doing great, I'll get back on track after the retreat."

My enthusiasm is still there and I'm really looking forward to the retreat in May/June.

Either meditating or not meditating is kind of a self-perpetuating habit. If I meditate regularly then I prioritize my goals and am able to distribute my time between different things that matter to me (including meditation). If I don't meditate, then I prioritize poorly and spend hours on relatively useless activities (mostly reading - have started Game of Thrones series; also some video games - Pokemon), and then those activities feel more important to me and I don't make time to meditate.

Even when I'm swinging towards the relatively useless activities, I'm still keeping up on grocery shopping, cooking meals, and doing dishes much better than I ever have in my life, along with being able to do that without self-medication.

And if I slip too far in the direction of unhealthy habits, I KNOW now that regular meditation will bring me back on track.

I'm less concerned now that I'll slip and drop the meditation entirely because I know what I need to do to stay healthy and happy, and that knowledge isn't going to go away.

ana futura
05-04-13, 01:26 PM
I'm finding that meditation treats EVERY symptom of my ADHD, except my trouble with reading. I still have to take meds for most school work. But I have noticed that regular meditation makes paying attention in lectures much easier, and if I've been meditating I don't need to take meds while in class.

As far as emotional dysregulation, the effects of meditation have been profound. In my experience, regular meditation "cures" the emotional aspects of ADHD. I have far fewer "tantrums".

The organizational benefits aren't as obvious. I do seem better at remembering where I've put my glasses and keys. My house is still a mess, but I'm staying on top of things a little better.

The effects are subtle (much subtler than meds), but they are many and they seem to build over time.

Regular meditation also makes maintaining a regular sleep schedule much easier.

I've been meditating (usually guided) about 4 times a week for 30 - 60 minutes for the past 2 months.

emily848
05-28-13, 01:28 PM
Leaving for meditation retreat tomorrow. 10 days of no talking, no writing, no reading, no computers, no phones, and meditating about ten hours a day. Wish me luck!

Meagan
05-28-13, 04:08 PM
10 days?! Good luck, indeed!

Your thread inspired me to start meditating again. I have never been able to stick with it, but I did take a course on TM when I was a young teenager.

I'm doing guided meditations now (youtube videos). Completely different experience from the way I was taught as a kid, but it is easier for me to grab my earbuds and phone and listen to a guided meditation than do it on my own.

Meagan
05-28-13, 04:21 PM
It's not easy at all! When I first started and my thoughts would bounce around, I kept telling myself: "That's not what you're doing RIGHT NOW," and bring myself back to concentrating on my breath. The "right now" is really helpful.


That refocusing is totally normal and an essential part of the process. Don't feel bad about it at all! Now that I think about, perhaps ADHD practitioners get a bonus due to the extra refocusing opportunities.

emily848
05-28-13, 07:22 PM
With practice, it's gotten a lot easier to quiet my mind, so there has definitely been progress!

For guided meditation, I like Belleruth Naparstek. She has a lot of different ones.

erratic
06-01-13, 05:12 AM
Unfortunately I am unable to see the the other threads in this section- I was only able to see this as last posted.

I believe meditation is the ultimate medicine. If I remember correctly, through meditation, your brain can actually grow new grey matter. Also the functioning of the prefrontal cortex (has to do with attention, decision making, planning, etc.) is increased. From experiments scientists have been able to see a noticeable difference in brain circuitry after just 8 weeks.

I myself stay away from meds of all kinds and prefer a more organic route. I believe it's possible to achieve a higher functioning, more actualized state of being through what one already has. I think someone who lets say has ADHD, perhaps could just used a little more meditation :).

As hypocritical as this might sound, I myself do not meditate. Though I make plans to do so, I never seem to come around to actually doing it. I know it is what I need and could possibly solve all of my problems, yet all I seem to be able to do is put it off time after time. It feels like some kind of paradoxical loopy thing.

ana futura
06-01-13, 06:49 AM
Unfortunately I am unable to see the the other threads in this section- I was only able to see this as last posted.


Click on Meditation and Spirituality, then scroll down. At the bottom you will see 3 boxes under "display options". Click on "From The" and change "last day" to "beginning"


As hypocritical as this might sound, I myself do not meditate. Though I make plans to do so, I never seem to come around to actually doing it. I know it is what I need and could possibly solve all of my problems, yet all I seem to be able to do is put it off time after time. It feels like some kind of paradoxical loopy thing.

Try joining a formal group training program, like Jon Kabat Zinn's Mindfulness Based Stress Reduction. I enrolled in an MBSR program as part of a study, and I'm very glad I did. I still struggle a lot with having the self discipline to do it regularly, but the training has made it easier than before. If nothing else you'll get a solid 8 weeks in.

erratic
06-01-13, 10:35 AM
thanks. I wish I could delete some of that, it's already covered. Hmm I'm not sure about the training part but the idea of group meditation appeals to me- I've meditated a little in the past and I've read up on different techniques.

ana futura
06-01-13, 06:12 PM
thanks. I wish I could delete some of that, it's already covered. Hmm I'm not sure about the training part but the idea of group meditation appeals to me- I've meditated a little in the past and I've read up on different techniques.

I had meditated prior to the training as well, but I really benefited from the in depth instruction. The instruction was more to prepare you for what you might uncover/ discover during the course of the class. The actual time spent explaining how to meditate was minimal. The group aspect was great, and joining a program meant I had to show up, unlike a weekly Zen sangha that I can blow off.

emily848
06-10-13, 03:43 PM
I only made it through four days of the retreat. On the morning of the fourth day the teacher told me there is no stretching in the meditation hall. This was a few hours prior to a special three hour session where we get to the heart of the technique we were learning.

So I tried to tough it out and move as little as possible for those three hours despite my back spasming. I had read somewhere that no one has ever hurt themselves while meditating, so I told mysef that if I quit early then I would feel better after ten minutes and feel foolish for giving up. Instead, I might be the first person in the 3,000 or so year history of meditation to hurt myself meditating. Strained a muscle in my back and couldn't sit upright anymore so went home early.

Had a relaxing rest of the week at home; meditated lying down 2-3 hours a day. I much prefer meditating sitting up, but I couldn't do it. I've always slowly stretched my back by leaning forward, etc, when my back starts hurting. I didn't think there was anything wrong with that, but it was not acceptable in the group setting. Too distracting to others, I guess.

It was a bummer that I had to leave early, but I just couldn't imagine staying for the remaining six days when I couldn't sit upright for long periods. I'm not terribly out of shape, but do have back problems, and need to work on flexibility.

I did enjoy the four days. We weren't allowed to run, but I had to do some fast walking some afternoons to get some energy out in order to have enough calmness for the evening meditation. They want everyone to move slowly, that may have been the hardest part. My favorite part was the vow of silence. Really nice not to have to (or be able to) make eye contact or exchange pleasantries.

Lesson learned: Don't go on a meditation retreat unless you can sit without moving for AT LEAST an hour.

ana futura
06-11-13, 06:44 PM
What kind of retreat was it? I know some centers / traditions are more lenient than others. I am very interested in thich nhat hanh's monestaries, as they do a lot of moving/ working meditation, and i believe they are more forgiving of stretching and things like that. I think it really depends on the center you go to.

emily848
06-12-13, 03:25 PM
What kind of retreat was it? I know some centers / traditions are more lenient than others. I am very interested in thich nhat hanh's monestaries, as they do a lot of moving/ working meditation, and i believe they are more forgiving of stretching and things like that. I think it really depends on the center you go to.

The one I went to is Vipassana meditation in the tradition of SN Goenka (http://www.mahavana.dhamma.org/). I mainly picked it because it is free. They accept donations from people who have completed the course, but it is optional, and if you don't complete then you can't donate. They say that stretching is fine for the practice, but not while in the retreat setting because it is distracting to others.

I'd like to try another retreat someday; maybe next year sometime.

ana futura
06-12-13, 03:51 PM
The one I went to is Vipassana meditation in the tradition of SN Goenka (http://www.mahavana.dhamma.org/). I mainly picked it because it is free. They accept donations from people who have completed the course, but it is optional, and if you don't complete then you can't donate. They say that stretching is fine for the practice, but not while in the retreat setting because it is distracting to others.

I'd like to try another retreat someday; maybe next year sometime.

I had thought about doing that one (also because it is free) but after doing a bit more research I decided not to. Your experience confirms my suspicions. The Insight Meditation Society is also based in vipassana, but I believe they are more accomodating to beginners and those with physical issues. Many centers will simply ask people who might need to move around to sit in the back row.

I kinda think the reasoning they gave you is ridiculous- if you can't meditate with distractions, what good is meditation? If you need absolute quiet to meditate, then are you really learning a skill that you can bring into your everyday life?

Bluerose
07-05-13, 10:38 AM
Folks have a listen to this guy on youtube - Adyashanti

He does a True Meditation CD thing that is wonderful and takes the 'stiffness' out of meditating. He says you can do it anywhere.

I have the CD and it's amazing.


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZvfG8sLjLl4