View Full Version : Success story - I overcame ADD by practicing a yoga discipline


goodtimesahead
02-03-13, 06:17 PM
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HEALTH CLAIMS MADE IN THIS MESSAGE ARE BASED ON TRADITIONAL YOGIC SOURCES AND ARE IN NO WAY INTENDED AS A SUBSITUTE FOR MEDICAL CARE.

IF YOU ENGAGE IN ANY LIFESTYLE CHANGE PRESENTED HEREIN, YOU AGREE TO DO SO AT YOUR OWN RISK AND ASSUME ALL RISK OF INJURY.

YOU ARE ADVISED TO SEEK GUIDANCE FROM A QUALIFIED KUNDALINI YOGA
INSTRUCTOR BEFORE PERFORMING ANY OF THE EXERCISES PRESENTED HEREIN.
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This is a story about how I used a practice called Kundalini Yoga to successfully deal with the symptoms of ADHD and transform my life beyond recognition. In short, Kundalini Yoga has helped me more than any medication I have taken for ADHD. My progress through yoga is such that doctors now refuse to prescribe me with any ADHD medication. It is as if meditation is my medication. A friend I bumped into after a long time put it quite simply by saying “You are all here now”.

I hope this inspires you take up Kundalini Yoga or some other yogic discipline. Feel free to message me if you have any questions or comments.

What is Kundalini Yoga?

Kundalini Yoga has a plethora of powerful physical exercises and meditations with targeted benefits. Some of the general benefits include:

•More strength, energy, fitness and vitality – Important for those who can feel run down.
•Greater clarity of thought – Us ADHDers all need more of this.
•Better health - Can help with digestive problems, high blood pressure amongst many other problems.
•Inner peace - Greater peace and ability to stay calm in the face of storms.

There are some specific Kundalini Yoga exercises which can help ADHD since they work on the frontal lobes and balance the hemispheres of the brain.

There are a lot of resources and books on Kundalini Yoga. I have provided more information at the end of this message.

How I benefited from Kundalini Yoga?

Kundalini Yoga changed my life in so many ways. Here is a summary of the main benefits it gave me:

•Improved cognitive functions: As well as being able to concentrate more, my working memory, mental speed and agility has improved significantly. I used to feel overwhelmed in work meetings since I couldn’t keep track of the conversation and was unable to “change gears” if someone threw a curveball. As a result, I would come across as a “bit slow”. I can now keep up with the pace of meetings more easily.
•Better time management and less procrastination: Before, I would often be late for work, appointments and social meetings. Even in my personal life I would find it difficult to complete tasks and errands as planned. Starting the day would be difficult since I would spend a lot of time watching TV or surfing the internet. I now find that I have more discipline and as a result the days flow a lot more easily since I can start on tasks on time and focus on completing them.
•Happier relationships: I am now less reactive towards my family, friends and in social situations and don’t take things people say so personally. As a result I am less prone to getting into arguments with people and can easily let things go. Also since I am now a better listener, I find people respond better to me since I am more engaged in conversations.
•Better diet: Yoga has made me more conscious of my body and I am now more sensitive to food I put into my body. I have become a pescetarian and eat a lots fresh fruits and vegetables (and some fish). I can now easily refrain from eating processed foods and sugary products. As you probably all know, a healthy diet helps a lot in managing ADHD.
•Good sleep: I used lack discipline in going to sleep and would sometimes take a while to fall asleep since my mind was thinking/worrying about god knows what. I can now easily turn out the lights at the appropriate time and fall asleep very quickly.
•Faster writing speed: Because of ADHD, I used to find it difficult to easily form coherent sentences in my head when typing. Although written English is still not my strong point, I find that I now write a lot faster than previously. This has made me much more productive.


How did ADHD affect my life?

I am a male and was born and bought up in London (UK) and still live here. I was diagnosed with ADHD over three years ago at the age of 26. I have the inattentive strand and have had problems with academia and my career. I was able to manage academia with some struggle to complete a masters degree. However, working in an office job was more challenging than academia since I would have to manage multiple tasks and complete work more quickly (i.e. on the day) than in academia. Symptoms of ADHD I experienced include:

•Short attention span - Inability to pay attention in conversations or in work meetings.
•Procrastination – I have worked in office based jobs and have found it difficult to start tasks since I would spend a lot of time mindlessly surfing the internet.
•Poor punctuality.
•Low energy – A general feeling of an energy drain and difficulty in simply getting the day started.
•Slow writing speed - Difficulty in thinking of words and sentences to express myself in writing.

Because of these symptoms, I found work very stressful since I would have to work extremely late just to keep up with my workload. I always had a feeling of job insecurity since I knew I wasn’t keeping up with my peer group.

I tried medications including Ritalin and Dexedrine. Ritalin did nothing for me. Dexedrine provided some benefits like less procrastination but these benefits were not enough since I still experienced many of the symptoms described above.

My journey with Kundalini Yoga.

Even after being diagnosed and medicated, I struggled a lot in life but then things started to take a turn when I discovered Kundalini Yoga. This ancient discipline has a plethora of physical exercises and meditations, each of which have a targeted benefit. From an ADHD perspective are there some exercises and meditations to increase energy and discipline, enhance the frontal lobes and balance the hemispheres of the brain. I came across a book called “Kundalini Yoga Meditation” by David S. Shannahoff Khalsa which has specific exercise sets for a variety of mental conditions. I started doing the exercises in this book which targeted ADHD.

Initially I thought yoga was not for me since I am not flexible and prefer intense sport to sitting on a yoga mat. Also, I found it challenging to sit still and do yoga and meditation but this became easier over time. As I practiced more, I began to notice some improvements like better retention during conversations and more discipline in completing tasks. Although I had a long way to go, Kundalini Yoga was giving me benefits above and beyond medication. These benefits inspired me to work with a private teacher and attend a couple of Kundalini Yoga retreats.

As time went on I started becoming more and more disciplined with my practice. It came to a point where yoga was an everyday part of my life. I would go to bed earlier (which was initially a struggle) and then force myself to wake up early to do my own practice of yoga. Having this time to myself first thing in the morning was the perfect way to start the day. I would feel calmer, clearer, more energetic and ready to face the challenges ahead.

Through regular practice of Kundalini Yoga and learning about spiritual philosophy, I went through a lot change over the next six months. I learnt to accept myself and developed greater self confidence. I would worry less about the future and fret less over the past and learnt to be in the present. My performance at work also improved to the point where I could take on more responsibility and finish on time. I wasn’t exactly a high flyer but I went from below average to somewhat decent which is a result given where I was before.

I became curious about what several weeks of intense and dedicated practice of Kundalini Yoga could do for me. If I was getting so much from a little bit everyday, I started to think that staying at a yoga ashram for several weeks to focus more on Kundalini Yoga could give me lasting benefits.

My chance to focus more on Kundalini Yoga came when my employer was doing redundancies. I opted for voluntary redundancy and the pay-out meant I could take a few months out of work to focus intensely on practicing Kundalini Yoga. I found an ashram in India, which would provide me the tranquillity and space needed to focus on yoga. I flew out to India with the intention of undergoing huge personal transformation.

In India, I spent 40 days doing about 5 hours of Kundalini Yoga everyday. Whilst I was there I could feel myself undergoing huge change. I had a huge surge in my energy levels and my focus was more sharper than I have ever felt in my life. My faith in Kundalini Yoga was paying off, the more I practiced the more benefits it gave to me.

I returned feeling fitter, calmer and more focused. I had an appointment scheduled with my private doctor who originally diagnosed me with ADHD and prescribed medication. In this meeting he took me through a series of computerised cognitive tests which rigorously assess working memory, cognitive speed and mental agility. I did not take medication for these and he was surprised to find that I performed better than when previously on medication. As a consequence he said that he cannot prescribe me with any medication given my performance. In short this was medically certified progress.

My life right now

After spending several weeks focusing on Kundalini Yoga, I can now maintain a disciplined regime of yoga practice everyday as part of normal life. I have started to look for a new job and feel optimistic about being able to handle the demands of a challenging job.

I have benefited in so many different ways from Kundalini Yoga as described above. I feel fortunate to have discovered this practice and hope many people are able to transform themselves like I have. I recently started a Kundalini Yoga teacher training course so I can hopefully help other people change their lives for the better.

Where to start with Kundalini Yoga?

It is one thing to read about Kundalini Yoga but you have to experience it for yourself. Below I have given websites and books to get started and some exercises which have helped me a lot:

Websites
• 3HO (3ho.org) – Stands for Healthy, Happy and Holy Organisation. This is global community for teachers and students of Kundalini Yoga. The website is a good comprehensive resource for everything that is Kundalini Yoga.
• International Kundalini Yoga Teachers association –(ikyta.org) – Here you can search for teachers and classes in your area. The database is not comprehensive so you should also try google searches to find teachers and classes in your area.

Books
Kundalini Yoga by Shakta Kaur Khalsa amazon.com/Kundalini-Yoga-Shakta-Kaur-Khalsa) - Good book which explains the basics well and provides a lot of good sets

Kundalini Yoga Meditation by David S. Shannahoff Khalsa (amazon.co.uk/Kundalini-Yoga-Meditation-Techniques-Psychiatric – This book has specific meditations for ADHD and other mental conditions.

Suggested Exercises

Claims that Kundalini Yoga can be dangerous are overblown. I can assure you, it is completely safe if you carefully follow the instructions. Ideally, you should seek guidance from a qualified Kundalini Yoga teacher to guide you through the exercises.

Kundalini Yoga can involve chanting of mantras which may seem “weird” to some or interfere with your religious beliefs. Don’t worry if this is the case since there are many exercises and meditations which are very beneficial for ADHD and do not involve any chanting.

When I started Kundalini Yoga I was focused on meditations to balance the brain. Whilst this was somewhat beneficial, a teacher explained I need to focus more on strengthening my core/navel area (solar plexus chakra) to give me more energy and discipline. My practice now combines physical work on the navel area with meditations for the brain. Below I have outlined some exercises that I have found most beneficial. Feel free to contact me with any questions.


Stretch pose 3ho.org/articles/stretch-yourself-stretch-pose - This is a challenging exercise which strengthens the core area. If you can get past 90 seconds and up to 3 mins you will have more energy and focus. You will need to use “breath of fire” which involves quickly exhaling through the nose whilst pumping the navel in (the inhale is automatic as you relax your navel). Make sure you keep your lower back on the floor and engage the navel properly with breath of fire. Women should avoid this exercise if they are more than 3 months pregnant or in the first three days of their “monthly cycle”.


Master Your Domain (Sahibi Kriya) 3ho-kundalini-yoga.eu/fileadmin/user_upload/pdf/1_sahibi_kriya.pdf - This is a powerful exercise set which targets your navel area. If you can do these exercises every day over 40 days then you will be able to more easily turn thoughts into actions. It works by increasing blood circulation to your limbs to get you moving into action. These exercises are a little painful but as they say no pain no gain. You can halve the recommended times to start with.

Sat Kriya – (3ho.org/articles/everything-kriya-sat-kriya)
Sat Kriya works on the lower chakras. It is regarded as one of the most powerful Kundalini Yoga exercises and should be treated with caution. Start with 3 mins and gradually work your way up to 11 mins. After completing this exercise you should rest (flat on your back) for at least the same amount of the time as you did the exercise.




The End

If you have reached this part then well done for paying attention to get all the way here. I understand some of you may think yoga is not for you. These were admittedly my first thoughts but I warmed to the practice overtime to the point where it is an essential part of my day. I can only suggest you have an open mind and try it. You have nothing to lose and all to gain.

With love and light,

Goodtimesahead

lightcode
02-13-13, 09:47 PM
Congrats on your success, after reading your post I had to reply. Your story is inspiring being that I have some of the same problems you outlined in your post. Thanks for sharing the knowledge; hopefully I can navigate this discipline and do-away with this ADD condition.

TagEHeuer
02-13-13, 09:49 PM
I honestly think this is a marketing post? Otherwise if not, great success. I have heard of Yoga helping calm the mind, but this is something else. Interesting to say the least. :)

ConcertaParent
02-13-13, 10:04 PM
I hope this inspires you take up Kundalini Yoga or some other yogic discipline. What do you think of Superbrain Yoga?

MellyFishButt
02-13-13, 10:19 PM
I honestly think this is a marketing post? Otherwise if not, great success. I have heard of Yoga helping calm the mind, but this is something else. Interesting to say the least. :)

Curious that this is the first post by this person. Spidey sense is tingling...

starry
02-13-13, 10:23 PM
Mellyfishbutt and TagEHeuer.... you guys have sensed/figured it out right away.

And I couldn't agree more with you two. ;)

fracturedstory
02-13-13, 10:31 PM
Meditation, exercise, etc can help somewhat. You've just really got to keep doing it.

I can never get into the routine for it. I've had some moments where I can think clearly, be calm and have one of those things called a memory. But it never lasts for me.

So congrats.

I don't think it's a marketing post. I think this person is very excited about their success and want to encourage others to reach it.

But I warn you, this thread may get heated, especially when you claim to 'overcome' ADHD.

All power to you though. I wish I had your strength. My dad was a Yoga teacher. It didn't do much for his suspected autism but he was healthy, calm and made a good living.

starry
02-13-13, 11:48 PM
I don't think it's a marketing post. I think this person is very excited about their success and want to encourage others to reach it.



I would have tended to agree with you on that, if the post didn't contain parts that suggest going to certain websites, certain organizations, certain books and where to buy them etc. I could be wrong, but this suggests to me that there's an existing agenda to promote these.

For example, in these parts:

"I came across a book called “Kundalini Yoga Meditation” by David S. Shannahoff Khalsa which has specific exercise sets for a variety of mental conditions."

"• 3HO (3ho.org) – Stands for Healthy, Happy and Holy Organisation. This is global community for teachers and students of Kundalini Yoga. The website is a good comprehensive resource for everything that is Kundalini Yoga.
• International Kundalini Yoga Teachers association –(ikyta.org) – Here you can search for teachers and classes in your area. The database is not comprehensive so you should also try google searches to find teachers and classes in your area.


Kundalini Yoga by Shakta Kaur Khalsa amazon.com/Kundalini-Yoga-Shakta-Kaur-Khalsa) - Good book which explains the basics well and provides a lot of good sets

Kundalini Yoga Meditation by David S. Shannahoff Khalsa (amazon.co.uk/Kundalini-Yoga-Meditation-Techniques-Psychiatric – This book has specific meditations for ADHD and other mental conditions."

"Sat Kriya – (3ho.org/articles/everything-kriya-sat-kriya)"

Mr Digital 01
02-14-13, 12:23 AM
Interesting, I'll come back & re-read this later. I did Iyengar yoga for a few years. It was good but not anything like the results you have achieved.

ana futura
02-14-13, 12:53 AM
I'm going to give the OP the benefit of the doubt.

I really don't think this is marketing, as the sites/ books mentioned have nothing to do with each other. The books aren't even from the same publisher.

There is no Kundalini Yoga mafia out there trying to get everyone to practice Kundalini. Kundalini is not a yoga "brand" in the way that Bikram or Baron Baptiste is. Also, undercover marketing in such a way would be very UN-kundalini like.

------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Thank you for the info OP. I too practiced Iyengar for a while, before my diagnosis. While I do think it helped me, I don't think it "treated" my ADHD as well as sitting meditation seems too.

I tried Kundalini once. It was a very interesting experience. It did seem to alter my mind a bit. I left the class feeling a bit manic. Apparently one of the breathing techniques we did is not recommended for ADHD'ers, because it will make us very excited instead of relaxed. The teacher seem confused when I told her that I had no idea how I was going to sleep that night, as I felt so energized. The rest of the class did indeed seem relaxed.

Anyway, this experience piqued my curiosity. I would like to try it again sometime, but maybe sticking to the exercises that are thought to be good for a hyper active brain.

ana futura
02-14-13, 01:03 AM
This is the exercise we did that I think made me a bit crazy, shoulder shrugs-

http://www.kundalini-yoga-info.com/kundalini-yoga-and-learning-disorders.html
This section is on Kundalini Yoga techniques for working with learning disorders such as Add, ADHD, and Dyslexia.
While there are other meditations for attention deficit disorder (ADD), and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), this technique for dyslexia is likely to help correct all learning disorders.

However, caution is required when using it for younger people with ADHD because this technique is powerful and can be overstimulating if practiced too long in the beginning.

There are three Kundalini Yoga techniques done first - before any exercise or meditation. However, if the person has ADHD, the third technique "Shoulder shrugs for vitality" should not be used because it can overstimulate people.

What is your take on this goodtimesahead? Do you do them?

I really do think they made me a bit crazy. When I left the class I ran home and was smiling hugely, yelling random things. It was similar to the manic state I can be in when I'm really excited about something.

I did like the feeling though.

tudorose
02-14-13, 04:08 AM
I've done yoga before. It was harder that doing karate.

goodtimesahead
02-14-13, 07:20 AM
Thanks for your responses and feedback.

I understand concerns that my original post was an attempt at marketing. I hope you can give me the benefit of the doubt. I provided some resources on the internet which you can access for free. If you are intrigued, then try these for yourself at home (at no cost) and if you want to take it further, seek out Kundalini Yoga classes which are local to you.

Peace,

Goodtimesahead

AshT
02-14-13, 07:26 AM
I FULLY FULLY FULLY FULLY support meditation!!!! I cannot stress enough how helpful it was.

When I first thought about meditation all I could think was 'Really? Sitting in a room still? How boring is that? No fking way I can do that'

Well I joined a group and gave it a shot.

And what an improvement it made. It drastically improved concentration and self-control - my two main problems. When in lectures I was able to stop myself from drifing off by being like 'No, that thought is not important now. I acknowledge it but I need to be in this room at this moment'. This extended to self control and stopping myself from going off on tangents of thought, and thinking about what's important.

It increases awareness about your thoughts, therefore meta-cognitive awareness, therefore you ability to be aware of your problems and therefore, you can move towards solving them. However the great thing about meditation is it does this in a positive way. It makes you aware, but doesn't mean you have to solve them, if you don't want to change it about yourself you don't have too.

For University, this along with medication has been my biggest solution.

goodtimesahead
02-14-13, 07:29 AM
@ana_futura - Thanks for your question. Interesting to hear your experience of kundalini yoga. I have not experienced something like that myself. I just read that the Shoulder Shrug technique for vitality "should not be practiced by individuals who are hyperactive".

I have the inattentive strand. Are you hyperactive?

goodtimesahead
02-14-13, 07:44 AM
@ConcertaParent - I don't know much about Superbrain Yoga. I just took a brief look and it looks interesting. I don't think there is any harm in trying. The exercises bear some resemblance to some Kundalini Yoga postures. Has your child tried Superbrain yoga?

It is good that you are exploring alternative therapies for your child. Whilst their brains are still developing they will reap the benefits more as adults if they regularly practice yoga/meditation when they are young.

The link below has an article which discusses an academic study on how meditation benefits the brain:

http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/238093.php

TagEHeuer
02-14-13, 07:51 AM
Thanks for your responses and feedback.

I understand concerns that my original post was an attempt at marketing. I hope you can give me the benefit of the doubt. I provided some resources on the internet which you can access for free. If you are intrigued, then try these for yourself at home (at no cost) and if you want to take it further, seek out Kundalini Yoga classes which are local to you.

Peace,

Goodtimesahead

It's all good, I think we've all gathered if it was a marketing post, you would've never logged back in, so sorry that I said it in my first post. :doh:

AshT
02-14-13, 08:07 AM
I FULLY FULLY FULLY FULLY support meditation!!!! I cannot stress enough how helpful it was.

When I first thought about meditation all I could think was 'Really? Sitting in a room still? How boring is that? No fking way I can do that'

Well I joined a group and gave it a shot.

And what an improvement it made. It drastically improved concentration and self-control - my two main problems. When in lectures I was able to stop myself from drifing off by being like 'No, that thought is not important now. I acknowledge it but I need to be in this room at this moment'. This extended to self control and stopping myself from going off on tangents of thought, and thinking about what's important.

It increases awareness about your thoughts, therefore meta-cognitive awareness, therefore you ability to be aware of your problems and therefore, you can move towards solving them. However the great thing about meditation is it does this in a positive way. It makes you aware, but doesn't mean you have to solve them, if you don't want to change it about yourself you don't have too.

For University, this along with medication has been my biggest solution.

Let me also add that joining a group was necessary for me. I wouldn't have had the self control and motivation to do it on my own. However once I started, I didn't see the benefits until 3 weeks later(we did it every wednesday for 2 hours, 20 minute bursts and then discussions on what we noticed/felt and it was really interesting to listen to others) and by three weeks I was more able to do it on my own.

bruukswuzheer
02-14-13, 06:31 PM
Hey everyone, this is my first post back at this site since early 2011. Any way, just to chime in, I have studied a technique called Silva Mind Control. although there is a small amount of spookyness to it, it is basically a procedure to help you fully relax your body, then go to deeper levels of relaxation mentally. In this state, you can develop skills and program your mind to achieve goals.

I have never "advertised" this but it has been a huge part of my add management.

along with Yoga, these two practices have made some otherwise impossible conditions slightly managable.

fracturedstory
02-14-13, 06:49 PM
I'm going to give the OP the benefit of the doubt.

I really don't think this is marketing, as the sites/ books mentioned have nothing to do with each other. The books aren't even from the same publisher.

There is no Kundalini Yoga mafia out there trying to get everyone to practice Kundalini. Kundalini is not a yoga "brand" in the way that Bikram or Baron Baptiste is. Also, undercover marketing in such a way would be very UN-kundalini like.

------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Thank you for the info OP. I too practiced Iyengar for a while, before my diagnosis. While I do think it helped me, I don't think it "treated" my ADHD as well as sitting meditation seems too.

I tried Kundalini once. It was a very interesting experience. It did seem to alter my mind a bit. I left the class feeling a bit manic. Apparently one of the breathing techniques we did is not recommended for ADHD'ers, because it will make us very excited instead of relaxed. The teacher seem confused when I told her that I had no idea how I was going to sleep that night, as I felt so energized. The rest of the class did indeed seem relaxed.

Anyway, this experience piqued my curiosity. I would like to try it again sometime, but maybe sticking to the exercises that are thought to be good for a hyper active brain.

Hatha yoga is the sh**

It's called that, right?

Shoulder shrugs sound fun.

ana futura
02-14-13, 11:27 PM
@ana_futura - Thanks for your question. Interesting to hear your experience of kundalini yoga. I have not experienced something like that myself. I just read that the Shoulder Shrug technique for vitality "should not be practiced by individuals who are hyperactive".

I have the inattentive strand. Are you hyperactive?

I am combined so I'm both hyperactive and inattentive.- I'm not hyperactive all the time, but when I am stimulated/ excited, I bounce off the walls. Something I did during kundalini really stimulated me. I'm not positive if it was the shoulder shrugs. I didn't dislike the feeling, but it was very different from my other experiences with yoga, which I usually find to be very relaxing/ sedating.

ana futura
02-14-13, 11:30 PM
Hatha yoga is the sh**

It's called that, right?

Shoulder shrugs sound fun.

Oh I LOVE hatha. It makes me feel so good. I think it's my favorite.

Kundalini is very different from any other yoga I've done, you should try it!

fracturedstory
02-15-13, 01:57 AM
Oh I LOVE hatha. It makes me feel so good. I think it's my favorite.

Kundalini is very different from any other yoga I've done, you should try it!
My dad taught it and something called Raja yoga too.

I'm not really interested in yoga even if it is good for me.

I prefer my unstructured uncoordinated dancing to very very loud music.

dresser
02-15-13, 04:49 AM
I was guided when the doc said ADD, I was guided to this site no others along the way, the finding of me fianally, finding me has been a guided toure Im not stoppn till i get all of me out from under that dung pile called ADD/ADHD, N all the co-z that go with it. I want the cure if there is one and along the way I will settle with getting better nd better if I want to see the sun set I have be willing to climb out of the hole diggin nd scratchin so yea I will mtry Kundaline yoga but if I get into a prezzell knott that requires major sugery Im going to be blaming yoozz lolol to still my hunger I can eat ONE potato for breky, lunch, and supper.
or I can choose varyity thank you stay well

dasikins
02-15-13, 11:58 AM
How can you guys focus on Yoga? I LOVE Yoga, but I find my mind is constantly someplace else. In fact I got a massage last night and all I could think about was my new diagnosis lol.

I wish I could get to that place, but for those that can thanks for the inspiration!

ana futura
02-15-13, 01:05 PM
How can you guys focus on Yoga? I LOVE Yoga, but I find my mind is constantly someplace else. In fact I got a massage last night and all I could think about was my new diagnosis lol.

I wish I could get to that place, but for those that can thanks for the inspiration!

This is part of it. Your mind will be someplace else. It's hard and annoying. Eventually if you do it enough, your mind will be more on what you're doing. There is no "place" to get to, it's just one long journey. Some points on the journey are more difficult than others, but no less beneficial.

Even if you spend the whole class trying to keep your mind on what your doing and failing, that's still doing something for you.

I have had some "horrible" shavasanas, but they still taught me something.

My biggest problem is being competitive with other people in class. Now your teacher will tell you not to do that, that's not what you're supposed to be doing. But just being aware of the fact that I am competitve with the 70 year old man with arthritis next to me is teaching me what I have to deal with, just as the man next to me is learning about the physical issues he has to deal with.

I might not be practicing yoga (or meditation, or martial arts) the "right" way, but on the other hand there is no "wrong" way. As long as you don't injure yourself, it's all good.

ConcertaParent
02-16-13, 12:12 AM
Yes, she tries to do Superbrain Yoga every day along with a weekly Hatha Yoga class. She also wants to take a karate class.
@ConcertaParent - I don't know much about Superbrain Yoga. I just took a brief look and it looks interesting. I don't think there is any harm in trying. The exercises bear some resemblance to some Kundalini Yoga postures. Has your child tried Superbrain yoga?

It is good that you are exploring alternative therapies for your child. Whilst their brains are still developing they will reap the benefits more as adults if they regularly practice yoga/meditation when they are young.

goodtimesahead
02-17-13, 09:13 AM
@dasikins – Our minds have become used to being busy over many many years. Trying to train our minds to be still after many years of being a scatter brain is an extended process. I am better than I used to be but still have some lapses.

I think of my mind like an ocean with waves continuously crashing. By focusing on the breath, I can calm the ocean to a point where my thoughts are ripples rather than large waves.

It might to help to try a simple meditation for just one minute and gradually build up from there. Sit down on the floor or a chair, close your eyes and slowly inhale/exhale through the nose. If you can keep mind reasonably still for a minute then increase this to two minutes and so on. Try to increase this practice up to five minutes and over time you will find you have more discipline over your mind. Although you won’t have an “off switch” you will have more control.

goodtimesahead
02-17-13, 09:28 AM
@AshT - Good to hear about the benefits you have reaped from meditation. Hope you can keep this up and make further progress.

I am glad I found yoga/meditation relatively early in my life. Part of me does wish I found this whilst at university or even before. Lucky you!!!

goodtimesahead
02-17-13, 10:14 AM
@ConcertaParent - Good to hear that your child is practicing SuperBrain yoga and Hatha yoga. I hope you kid is reaping benefits from their yogic practice.