View Full Version : Borderline Personality Disorder with ADD


Andrea715
02-13-13, 06:13 PM
Is there anyone out there that has any information on Borderline Personality Disorder. I just read up on it and I most definitely have the symptoms and it appears that most of the symptoms develop over the spand of years due to a bad up bringing and such. My moods and emotion can appear to be content and happy but there is an underlining pull that I dont want to deal with people consistently. That I want to always protect myself and keep people at a distance. I dont want to be emotional, or vulnerable with people are the vibes that I give off. not really wanting to though.

dvdnvwls
02-13-13, 06:25 PM
You need to go to a doctor (preferably a psychiatrist) or a psychologist. There is not good enough help on the internet for BPD.

starry
02-13-13, 07:52 PM
Is there anyone out there that has any information on Borderline Personality Disorder. I just read up on it and I most definitely have the symptoms and it appears that most of the symptoms develop over the spand of years due to a bad up bringing and such. My moods and emotion can appear to be content and happy but there is an underlining pull that I dont want to deal with people consistently. That I want to always protect myself and keep people at a distance. I dont want to be emotional, or vulnerable with people are the vibes that I give off. not really wanting to though.

I think BPD is the hardest of all mental disorders to diagnose, because its symptoms mimic those of other disorders so much (like bi-polar disease for example and others). I think many people who have BPD are misdiagnosed and/or those who don't actually have BPD, are diagnosed with having it.
Were you prescribed medication and/or are you undergoing psychotherapy at the moment?

Andrea715
02-13-13, 09:48 PM
I was diagnosed by an old RN and my husband. I fought it tooth and nail. I am currently on medication for ADD and have been for a long time. Im just now looking at what it really is. Neither even believed that I had ADD but BPD instead.

starry
02-14-13, 05:54 AM
Well, if after reading about it, you believe you have it, then you're probably right.

As you know already I'm sure, currently there are no FDA approved medications available to treat BPD, but I'm sure your ADD medication is helping with managing specific symptoms.
I've read that certain mood stabilizers can be helpful, as well as Omega 3 fatty acids.

dogluver358
02-18-13, 05:13 PM
Do you have a therapist? DBT has been shown to be helpful in the treatment of BPD. There's actually a couple of websites that have free DBT material if you can't go to a therapist as well as a book by Marsha Lineham (sp?).

aylaah
02-19-13, 12:47 AM
If you believe you have it, a psych is the best place to go, but believing you have it is probably half their battle if you're keen for diagnosis and treatment - they struggle and the stigma largely exists because of BPD sufferers not being aware or wanting to admit to the disorder. My husband had symptoms very similar to BPD - also picked up on by others including a forensic RN we know, and was recently diagnosed with Bipolar II, with borderline, O/C and avoidant traits - so 'nearly' BPD but not quite, with a few other things in there. I know a fair bit about it though. There is something they can do as far as an interview in a diagnostic setting that can help with diagnosis and also deciding if its that, or something similar.

ADDMagnet
03-29-13, 08:01 PM
Hi Andrea

Approximately 50% of those with BPD have ADHD as well. So that can definitely add to the confusion, especially since there are some similarities between the two, such as impulsiveness, problems with anger, and boredom to name a few. If someone has BPD, there is usually at least one other comorbid diagnoses--ADHD, depression, anxiety disorders, bipolar disorder, or PTSD are some common ones.

There are biological and environmental factors that contribute to the development of BPD. Even a head injury could contribute to the development of BPD. Not everyone with BPD has had an abusive childhood or traumatic event but those can be risk factors. Other common risk factors include early parental loss, untreated ADHD, genetics, unstable family environment, adoption. Someone may be born with a genetic predisposition to the development of BPD but they may or may not develop it. The more risk factors that are involved, including relatives with the disorder, the greater the risk for developing BPD. The limbic system area of the brain, which includes the amygdala and hippocampus, is the part of the brain that is related to emotional regulation. A malfuntioning in this area can contribute to many of the symptoms such as the mood swings, anger and dysphoria.

Effective treatment includes both medication and therapy. Unfortunately, there are a lot of misconceptions about the disorder and opinions on how to treat it can vary greatly among doctors and therapists. There are 9 criteria listed in the DSM for BPD and a person has to meet at least 5 of the 9 criteria. Although thoughts of suicide and self-harming are included in the criteria they do not have to be present for someone to receive a diagnosis of BPD. There are varying levels of severity and depending on the combination of criteria present, not all individuals with BPD fit the "textbook" picture.

Hope this was somewhat helpful.