View Full Version : Could this be Asperger's?


Synced
02-16-13, 06:43 PM
Hi all, pretty new to here to posting so bear with me. I was dxed with ADHD a year ago and have since been suspicious of other underlying disorders including GAD, OCD, and avoidance personality disorder. I then read about Asperger's and realized that it encompasses these disorders to some extent. I brought it up with my psych and she ruled it out immediately. I'm not the professional or am I seeking such advice here. Just looking for some opinions.

I've talked to my parents about my verbal and social skill development, and they didn't notice any abnormal symptoms. I remember that my walk was a bit different and my pediatrician tried to correct it. Although I can't remember everything about my childhood, these traits I believe stood out.

My symptoms as a child:
- repetitive movement (twisted my fingers, sometimes in a blanket, til they were raw)
- more emotional connection with cat
- used big words without understanding meaning
- seeked friendship but struggled connecting with people
- self taught myself piano (lost interest after taking lessons)
- strict adherence to routines (how I walked to school, etc.)
- emotional connection with my "blankie" and some stuffed animals til early teen years
- slightly monotone to the point where people would ask me to repeat
-I hate repeating myself and get angry when people ask
- sensitivity to touch, lights and sound (picky with clothes, hated certain textures in food, sometimes would flinch or say "ouch" when touched)

What throws me off from a typical diagnosis is the lack of clumsiness. I played baseball, soccer, and basketball growing up. I was an amazing baseball player and have always considered myself to have amazing hand-eye coordination.

As I got older, specifically starting in middle to high school and even more I'm college, these symptoms became more prevalent. I struggle to engage in conversation with people I'm not entirely comfortable with, missing non-verbal cues. I also have difficulty with generating responses. Sometimes my brain is trying so hard to process that I can't say anything or comes out weird. I read somewhere that people with Asperger's or HFA learn to cope with it over the years, and can be social, but at a cost. Conversations for me are exhausting, especially with women.

Symptoms as adult:
- "mind blindness" at times
- some signs of echolalia
- inability to understand social cues despite being able to recognize them
- strict adherence to routines
- stimming with finger twisting
- narrows interests that change from time to time, but never in intensity
- I have to research something for hours when I'm interested
- difficulty listening to others or feeling empathy for them
- take things too literally
- sensitive to criticism
- genuinely too nice and honest, at times too trusting
- constant feeling of disconnection with friends
- obsession with the details, missing the big picture at times
- constant need to understand other's schedules and even thought processes
- very unique approach to controversial issues and non conforming view on religion
- lack of intimate relationships and motivation to have one
- good rote memory (can remember lyrics to a few hundred songs, Rubik's cube, 100 digits of pi, strange fascination for patterns and numbers)

My parents both had anxiety, and I see some of aforementioned traits on my dads side. My dad, for some reason, can recognize the city given almost any area code. My sister can remember days and dates for almost everything we've done. Weird...

It seems to fit so well as an adult even after being told that I had no signs of it as a child. Could this be HFA that slid under the radar, or possibly a combination or my ADHD and other personality disorders? Regardless, it's not just ADHD (dxed combined type but I think I'm PI)

What do you guys think?

Fortune
02-16-13, 06:52 PM
It's a possibility and might be worth investigating.

This is a quiz that is... online, but has been validated with rather extensive testing. It might help you see if there's something worth investigating further or not. It will not diagnose you, however:

http://rdos.net/eng/Aspie-quiz.php

Lunacie
02-16-13, 07:46 PM
Anxiety and depression are the two most common cormorbid disorders
alongside ADHD.

However some of the other things you mentioned do seem to fit better
into a diagnosis of Autism spectrum disorder - not necessarily Asperger's.

The family therapist we saw when we were first getting my granddaughter
diagnosed (atypica autism and anxiety, possible ADHD) slipped a Connor's
test through the system for me.

The really great part is that instead of just telling me the results that he
thought fit me, he gave me a copy of the results.

They show a mix of ADHD, slightly higher score on the Inattentive type,
but high enough on the impulsive/hyperactive questions that I believe I'd
be considered Combined type.

They also show Anxiety and Depression, no surprise; PTSD, didn't realize
that was still affecting me; and a notation that I should maybe look into
the possibility of Autism spectrum disorder, although the test doesn't look
specifically for that.

I don't have any health insurance or money, so at my age I probably won't
ever get a further diagnosis. But I'm convinced that I have some form of
Autism spectrum disorder.

Fortune
02-16-13, 07:56 PM
In the US in a very short time the DSM-5 goes into effect, and autism, AS, PDD-NOS, etc will be "Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD)"

Synced
02-16-13, 08:13 PM
In the US in a very short time the DSM-5 goes into effect, and autism, AS, PDD-NOS, etc will be "Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD)"

How will this affect the way people are diagnosed? I feel like people could fit into this spectrum with extreme variations.

Fortune
02-16-13, 08:17 PM
How will this affect the way people are diagnosed? I feel like people could fit into this spectrum with extreme variations.

They will get diagnosed with ASD instead of PDD-NOS, AS, or autism.

The new criteria are supposed to account for extreme variations.

fracturedstory
02-19-13, 02:00 AM
In the US in a very short time the DSM-5 goes into effect, and autism, AS, PDD-NOS, etc will be "Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD)"
May 18. :yes:

How will this affect the way people are diagnosed? I feel like people could fit into this spectrum with extreme variations.

They will be diagnosed based on impairments and how much support they require, like anyone with any disorder should.