View Full Version : Does Christianity fit here?


DotwithADD
02-18-13, 02:08 PM
I am a Christian and I feel that it ties in with spirituality. I do a LOT of praying especially when I feel anxious or depressed... I feel that my prescriptions help but I thank God everytime I take my medications that help with my ADD, OCD, and anxiety.

dvdnvwls
02-18-13, 02:33 PM
I'm not an administrator or moderator, but in my own opinion Christianity is part of spirituality and should be on-topic as long as the posts are ADD-related and not simply an excuse to discuss religion. Personally I would put it like this: I (remembering that I'm not a mod or admin...) would be happy to read about how Christian prayer and other religious practices affect ADD (and how ADD affects those practices as well), and I would be unhappy to read posts discussing Christianity for its own sake, or people patting each other on the back simply for being Christian, or arguing about religion.


I'll go next; if the thread gets deleted because anything remotely religious is too "hot" to keep on the board, I'll certainly understand.


There is a spiritual practice/prayer method/meditation/whatever-it-ought-to-be-called, that involves walking a labyrinth. For many people, it is a moving and useful experience to pray or meditate in that way. I tried it and simply "didn't get it", and since then I've wondered why it made no sense at all to me (I felt like "So? I'm walking in a circle. Now what?"). My labyrinth experience was long before I suspected I had ADHD, and now I'm wondering how much ADHD had to do with my complete lack of ability to use that method. Does it mean the labyrinth is not for me, or does it perhaps mean that I could benefit greatly from working at it and finding out how?

Abi
02-18-13, 02:43 PM
For your information, from the Meditation & Spirituality Guidelines:

This section is here to offer a place for members to discuss meditation and spirituality as a means of treating and/or managing their ADHD or other disorders.

Our goal is to offer a safe, supportive atmosphere for all members. We are a diverse group, coming from many different cultures, religions and backgrounds. It is important for us to remember and respect that. Therefore the following guidelines apply:

*The bashing of other religions, groups or individuals is not permitted.

*Evangelism is not permitted in this section. Share what has encouraged you, don’t sell it.

[...]

*Above all, let this be your guide: That you treat others the way you would like to be treated.

If you have any questions or concerns please contact a moderator or administrator.


Just one further note... please be aware that this is the only section on ADDF, apart from the private debates section, where religious discussion is allowed.

DotwithADD
02-18-13, 02:43 PM
I'm not an administrator or moderator, but in my own opinion Christianity is part of spirituality and should be on-topic as long as the posts are ADD-related and not simply an excuse to discuss religion. Personally I would put it like this: I (remembering that I'm not a mod or admin...) would be happy to read about how Christian prayer and other religious practices affect ADD (and how ADD affects those practices as well), and I would be unhappy to read posts discussing Christianity for its own sake, or people patting each other on the back simply for being Christian, or arguing about religion.


I'll go next; if the thread gets deleted because anything remotely religious is too "hot" to keep on the board, I'll certainly understand.


There is a spiritual practice/prayer method/meditation/whatever-it-ought-to-be-called, that involves walking a labyrinth. For many people, it is a moving and useful experience to pray or meditate in that way. I tried it and simply "didn't get it", and since then I've wondered why it made no sense at all to me (I felt like "So? I'm walking in a circle. Now what?"). My labyrinth experience was long before I suspected I had ADHD, and now I'm wondering how much ADHD had to do with my complete lack of ability to use that method. Does it mean the labyrinth is not for me, or does it perhaps mean that I could benefit greatly from working at it and finding out how?

I say keep at it. To me God has helped me through my ADD, my OCD, etc to learn to trust him while going through ADD, etc especially depression and anxiety. He can help you too. Don't give up on spirituality or yourself through your journey with ADHD.

DotwithADD
02-18-13, 02:46 PM
Oh, and I agree with you regarding Spirituality and Christianity should not be discussed without linking it to add or adhd, etc. Because I believe Christianity can help everyone get through the hard times while going through symptoms and side effects of their condition and medication for ADD and ADHD, OCD, etc.

lalapin
02-18-13, 03:10 PM
Not necessarily christianity but I guess any religion helps giving hope and guidance to people

lalapin
02-18-13, 03:13 PM
I have to add that because of ADHD I get distracted while praying and sometime leave incomplete prayers, but God probably forgives me and understands, lol

DotwithADD
02-18-13, 08:04 PM
I have to add that because of ADHD I get distracted while praying and sometime leave incomplete prayers, but God probably forgives me and understands, lol

Yes He does, lapin! I sometimes find myself repeatedly praying the same prayer, but like you said, He understands.

Mr Digital 01
02-18-13, 08:32 PM
If Christian practices like prayer help you Dot and you follow the guidelines there is no reason why you can't share them with us.
Just be aware that most people have already made up their minds about what they think of religions and may not be able to use your suggestions.

My Ex, while no longer believing in God in the way she was taught about him, still prays every night to 'something' before bedtime.
In a way, I wish I could believe in God, I can see the comfort it can give people. Even though I was raised catholic... I simply cannot believe!
That's just me... knock yourself out sharing!

dvdnvwls
02-18-13, 09:04 PM
Oh, and I agree with you regarding Spirituality and Christianity should not be discussed without linking it to add or adhd, etc. Because I believe Christianity can help everyone get through the hard times while going through symptoms and side effects of their condition and medication for ADD and ADHD, OCD, etc.
I'm actually slightly concerned that you have made four posts in this thread and none of your posts involve a discussion of ADHD - you seem to be only saying that religion helps get people through tough times.

To bring it back on topic - do you have any ADHD-specific ideas about why the labyrinth might be helpful for me?

Spacemaster
02-18-13, 09:09 PM
I don't believe the posts have to specifically address ADHD.

As long as a person doesn't try to preach or convince someone else of their religion, it should be OK.

One thread was just about "spiritual quotes that mean something to you" I could be wrong, but I don't think it was very specific to ADHD.

Please correct me if I am wrong, fellow mods!

dvdnvwls
02-18-13, 09:22 PM
(Didn't mean to be unkind or picky - I really am interested in more than just the "don't give up, God is worth it" type of thing, that's all.)

Abi
02-18-13, 09:58 PM
dvd... you could start a thread of your own, with your own ideas, or asking members for input on whatever interests you :)

dvdnvwls
02-18-13, 10:25 PM
dvd... you could start a thread of your own, with your own ideas, or asking members for input on whatever interests you :)
Good point. :o

Drewbacca
02-21-13, 11:04 AM
Not necessarily christianity but I guess any religion helps giving hope and guidance to people

Exactly! The most important faith, is faith in oneself... but sometimes, often, we need to humble ourselves and ask some higher power for guidance on this matter. The path is difficult to begin with, and likely an impossible path to walk alone.

I'm not a Christian, but I do pray. I often ask "God" or as I usually phrase it "the powers that be" (as God is something far beyond my understanding and comprehension).... I often ask God to guide me in being a vessel for his(?) work. I don't understand life, but I do think that there is a purpose and that we all have a duty of sorts.

I have a hard time understanding why an intelligent creator would burden me with this disorder, but I do have faith that there is some reason and I just have yet to recognize it. That being the case, I continue to ask for guidance. If nothing else, this recognition helps me to live with the disorder within my frame work of understanding of the universe.

In my own opinion, I believe that everything/person has a purpose. Faith in God is a wonderful way to find our purpose... so long as we are humbled by the fact that God gives each of us our own path to walk; no one path is more correct than another (although, many are more incorrect... but that can of worms goes beyond what would be allowable discussion). The important thing is to focus on the shared faith and love of the spirit... and not to let ourselves be divided by a difference in translation or misrepresentation of a belief. If we are striving for goodness and are humble, then we are all on the same page regardless of what church we walk into.

What happens at the end of life, we can share with other members of our respected belief system. What happens in life, as far as ADHD is concerned, is a burden that we share. There's no reason not to walk that path as friends! :)

meadd823
02-22-13, 05:27 PM
Oh, and I agree with you regarding Spirituality and Christianity should not be discussed without linking it to add or adhd, etc. Because I believe Christianity can help everyone get through the hard times while going through symptoms and side effects of their condition and medication for ADD and ADHD, OCD, etc.


I think prayer for many a Christians acts in much the same way that meditation does for Buddhist or ritual practices does for pagans.

I believe prayer offers a way to gain relaxed focus which is very difficult for many ADDers but I do believe it to be invaluable as far as helping with ADD brain fog / scatter as well as the anxiety that can accompany it.

I think the Christian form of spirituality offers many the grounding in belief, self forgiveness and even life style structure that can be elusive for many ADDers.

Church attendance can be a type of accountability that can work in the same manner as coaching as well as offer productive socialization on a regular basis. I see many benefits for christian spiritual practice when it comes to living with ADHD

eats_mice
02-23-13, 11:11 PM
I have to add that because of ADHD I get distracted while praying and sometime leave incomplete prayers, but God probably forgives me and understands, lol
Dude, whenever I'm talking to God, I'll suddenly find myself daydreaming instead... it's kinda funny.

Spacemaster
02-23-13, 11:58 PM
You know, I used to be a christian, and for reasons I won't get into, I'm not now, but,

I remember praying at night, and then find myself going off on a thought tangent. All of a sudden I was no longer talking to God anymore, I was telling him something, and I'd go off-topic. :p
I'd even tell him in my mind, "sorry bout that. well, you know what I mean anyway"

In a way I miss some of it. Life feels so uncontrollable, especially with neurological disorders.

ana futura
02-24-13, 12:24 AM
To bring it back on topic - do you have any ADHD-specific ideas about why the labyrinth might be helpful for me?

The labyrinth is a form of walking meditation/ prayer. I am not Christian, but I have walked the labyrinth. I find it very centering. There is walking meditation in Buddhism too.

I practiced martial arts and yoga for several years, starting at around age 12. I think this has benefited me tremendously. Meditative experiences were very difficult for me when I was young, but over time they've gotten easier. I do think this has been really helpful for overcoming some aspects of my ADHD.

I have found that many things that are challenging for me are good for me, and that my initial frustration with a difficult activity ultimately leads to a positive outcome. This is not always true, but for things like meditation, it is definitely true.

I'm not sure I'd start with walking the labyrinth. I think yoga and tai chi accomplish the same thing more thoroughly. After you are more comfortable with meditative practices, perhaps you could try the labyrinth again.

Kunga Dorji
02-24-13, 03:15 AM
Oh, and I agree with you regarding Spirituality and Christianity should not be discussed without linking it to add or adhd, etc. Because I believe Christianity can help everyone get through the hard times while going through symptoms and side effects of their condition and medication for ADD and ADHD, OCD, etc.

Dot,
Although I am a Buddhist,
I have many close Christian friends.
A Catholic nun I know, in fact uses prayer techniques very similar to my own meditation techniques.

Many of the leading lights in the application of Mindfulness to management of psychological problems, and the understanding of the neuroscientific validity of these approaches, come from Buddhist backgrounds.

However they have been at pains to refine the core techniques into skills that can be used by anyone from any background.

In fact they can enhance Christian prayer, and there is interaction ongoing between religions to facilitate this.

Kunga Dorji
02-24-13, 03:26 AM
I think prayer for many a Christians acts in much the same way that meditation does for Buddhist or ritual practices does for pagans.

I believe prayer offers a way to gain relaxed focus which is very difficult for many ADDers but I do believe it to be invaluable as far as helping with ADD brain fog / scatter as well as the anxiety that can accompany it.

I think the Christian form of spirituality offers many the grounding in belief, self forgiveness and even life style structure that can be elusive for many ADDers.

Church attendance can be a type of accountability that can work in the same manner as coaching as well as offer productive socialization on a regular basis. I see many benefits for christian spiritual practice when it comes to living with ADHD

At a very basic level- ritual acts as a sort of initiation into a conditioned reflex that facilitates meditation or prayer.

It goes deeper than that though:
Ref
"The Divine Matrix"
Gregg Braden
Interviewing a senior Tibetan Buddhist practitioner.

Braden to Tibetan:
what's happening to you on the inside?[/I]"


Answer from the abbot:

You have never seen our prayers, because a prayer cannot been seen What you have seen is what we do to create the feeling in our bodies. The feeling IS the prayer"
--- and that is exactly what my Catholic Nun friend says.

When we look closely we can see that all the religions are pursuing the one goal of kindness and mutual support. It is just that thy come from different language and cultural traditions.

Do what works for you- you will know it works if it helps you become kinder, gentler, more attentive and more inclusive.

SB_UK
02-24-13, 01:27 PM
I am a Christian and I feel that it ties in with spirituality. I do a LOT of praying especially when I feel anxious or depressed... I feel that my prescriptions help but I thank God everytime I take my medications that help with my ADD, OCD, and anxiety.
The underlying point/commonality of all religions offers the solution to the disorder element in ADHD - so sounds good ... ...

Jesus' ministry, sacrificial death, and subsequent resurrection are often referred to as the Gospel ...
In short, the Gospel is news of God the Father's eternal victory over evil, and the promise of salvation and eternal life for all people, through divine grace.I think that the Christian (or anybody open to the wisdom of the great religions) should cling onto (and never let go of) that thought ... ... and ... ... make it happen (and asap) for themselves - for - selfish, social or altruistic reasons.

What would the individual (as God) overcoming evil look like (to the individual) ?

Immersion in 'Divine grace' sounds as though it indicates irreversible engagement of a spiritual state ?

Did Buddha ever revert to the behaviours pre-enlightenment post-enlightenment ?

DotwithADD
02-24-13, 05:58 PM
You know, I used to be a christian, and for reasons I won't get into, I'm not now, but,

I remember praying at night, and then find myself going off on a thought tangent. All of a sudden I was no longer talking to God anymore, I was telling him something, and I'd go off-topic. :p
I'd even tell him in my mind, "sorry bout that. well, you know what I mean anyway"

In a way I miss some of it. Life feels so uncontrollable, especially with neurological disorders.


Used to be a Christian? I believe once saved always saved. Us Christians are not perfect (especially with ADHD or ADD, of course). God understands, He knows because He made us this way for a reason which the exact reason, we don't know yet. That's my belief anyway. I'm trying not to be preachy, so if I seem like it, please forgive me. Once I get on my soapbox, it's hard to step down. So I'll step down now before I get in trouble. When I pray, I'll accidentally repeat myself - it used to bother me but now I realize it's normal with ADD'ers.

Grantham
03-10-13, 11:14 PM
I would think any religion would fit here as long as it isn't a "me good. You bad. Me Christian. You not. You go to hell" sort of post.

BellaVita
03-11-13, 12:14 AM
To the OP: I'm glad that has helped you through the hard times that come with ADHD.

I know for me, prayer has been a way for me to practice focusing since it's so hard to do sometimes! I also find that for me, I seem to be more "clear-headed" and thus resulting in "easier" focus the more time I spend in prayer.

It has definitely helped *me* with managing my ADHD. :)

crystal8080
03-11-13, 02:15 AM
Praying is good for you no matter "who" you pray to.

As time goes on I find myself feeling more and more connected spiritually even though I have never had a religion and probably never will.

I wouldn't say I "pray" as much as "talk". I don't know any of the proper "prayers" and anyways I think I would feel pretty silly if I did. Don't think I could remember any anyway! I'm sure I repeat myself too. I don't remember repeating myself to anyone else so why wouldn't I do the same thing to God?:p

eats_mice
03-11-13, 10:18 AM
I wouldn't say I "pray" as much as "talk". I don't know any of the proper "prayers" and anyways I think I would feel pretty silly if I did. Don't think I could remember any anyway! I'm sure I repeat myself too. I don't remember repeating myself to anyone else so why wouldn't I do the same thing to God?:p
Prayer is just talking with God, telling him waht's going on in your life. There's no formula or recitations necessary. This is a common misconception, even among people who claim to be Christians.

Zaashy
03-11-13, 11:45 AM
I'm Agnostic, life is what it is.

FogNoggin
03-11-13, 11:58 AM
I abandoned belief in a god a long time ago.
Sometimes I wish I could believe.
But I don't.

In some ways I envy your capacity to believe.
In some ways I don't.

All I have is myself, other people, and the whole Universe.

Religion is a very touchy subject and can be the source of discord.
(Is that an answer to your question?)

Please delete this post if inappropriate, my last post was, even though I thought it not.

DotwithADD
03-11-13, 01:12 PM
I abandoned belief in a god a long time ago.
Sometimes I wish I could believe.
But I don't.

In some ways I envy your capacity to believe.
In some ways I don't.

All I have is myself, other people, and the whole Universe.

Religion is a very touchy subject and can be the source of discord.
(Is that an answer to your question?)

Please delete this post if inappropriate, my last post was, even though I thought it not.

Whether you believe in God or not is not the issue here. I'm not judging anyone. Just to let everyone know what has helped me with my ADD and how it's helped me. I don't think this post is that inappropriate. You spoke up about religion. You don't have to be a Christian to have religion. I just wondered if my belief in God as a Christian would fit in this category, that's all, oh, and how it has helped me with my ADD. Now if the moderators think it inappropriate, only they can delete it, I think. It's up to them.

Fuzzy12
03-11-13, 01:46 PM
I'm an atheist but I do believe that if you have faith it can help you tons in dealing with well, everything in life, including mental health disorders.

1. Primarily, I imagine it to be very reassuring. Not just the thought that everything happens for reason and has meaning and purpose, but also believing that there is a greater benevolent power out there to take care of you. When everything and everyone fails, there is still God who makes everything all right. It's a bit like children (and I don't mean that in an offensive way) who have absolute and implicit faith in their parents (at least I would like to think so) to make everything ok.

2. The world can be quite scary, if you've got a mental health disorder. Scary and lonely but if you have faith, you are never alone. Having a mental disorder can be quite isolating. For me, it separates me from the rest of the world, the NTs, the ones who have a brain that functions as it's supposed to. I don't understand them and they don't understand me. Well, I think, I do understand them but I can't relate to them. If there is a benevolent, omniscient God, he understands everything. He made you. You are one of his. You are not alone because God is always with you.

3. Faith can be a source of strength. I'm becoming more and more aware of my limitations. I fully believe that humans are limited by their faculties. Beyond a certain point, our bodies just can't perform. We can't fly. We can't survive without water for more than a few days or without food for more than a few weeks. We can't feel happy unless our neurotransmitters and other cognitive mechanisms are working properly. I don't believe these physical limitations can be overcome. However, if you believe in God, then I guess, that power ranks higher to you than the limits of your physical being (or the physical laws that rule the universe). And having that belief, that anything is possible with the help and approval of God, might make you more confident, might make you strive for more beyond the limits of your mental capabilities.

4. I can imagine that meditation/prayer is quite calming and maybe can even train/improve our cognitive functions. I guess a lot of mindfulness techniques are variations of meditation techniques.

I guess, a lot of ADHDers struggled with focussing but a practical meditation technique that my mom has told me about is to neither focus on anything in particular, nor to try to empty your mind and focus on nothing (both of which are impossible for me). She said a form of meditation is to just watch your thoughts. Don't try to reject or suppress any thoughts but just observe them. Or observe your feelings. Without any judgement and without focussing on any objective. Just let yourself be.

I rarely do it but I can imagine that it could help (as a bonus it's non religious so some thing us atheists could do as well).

crystal8080
03-11-13, 04:22 PM
I would never dream of changing someone's mind or try to influence someone's spiritual beliefs. I don't think there is anything more personal than belief in a higher power, and equally important, belief in the absence of a higher power. If it adds value to your life- either way- then its not anyone's place to touch it.

Its just that sometimes I feel so lonely, so incredibly sad and alone. And talking to someone whether its imaginary or not, makes me feel better. I never used to need to do this. But when I feel unloved, thinking someone loves me no matter what even if Im not sure they are there, and I can't see them, or hear them and really ---there is no logical reason to think its real...sometimes its the only thing that gets me to the next day. People can call it whatever they want, I have no interests in absolutes or answers or anything.

I used to spend a lot of time thinking about it. I've just come to accept it is what it is and I will never have the answers.

Kunga Dorji
03-11-13, 06:52 PM
I'm an atheist but I do believe that if you have faith it can help you tons in dealing with well, everything in life, including mental health disorders.

1. Primarily, I imagine it to be very reassuring. Not just the thought that everything happens for reason and has meaning and purpose, but also believing that there is a greater benevolent power out there to take care of you. When everything and everyone fails, there is still God who makes everything all right. It's a bit like children (and I don't mean that in an offensive way) who have absolute and implicit faith in their parents (at least I would like to think so) to make everything ok.

2. The world can be quite scary, if you've got a mental health disorder. Scary and lonely but if you have faith, you are never alone. Having a mental disorder can be quite isolating. For me, it separates me from the rest of the world, the NTs, the ones who have a brain that functions as it's supposed to. I don't understand them and they don't understand me. Well, I think, I do understand them but I can't relate to them. If there is a benevolent, omniscient God, he understands everything. He made you. You are one of his. You are not alone because God is always with you.

3. Faith can be a source of strength. I'm becoming more and more aware of my limitations. I fully believe that humans are limited by their faculties. Beyond a certain point, our bodies just can't perform. We can't fly. We can't survive without water for more than a few days or without food for more than a few weeks. We can't feel happy unless our neurotransmitters and other cognitive mechanisms are working properly. I don't believe these physical limitations can be overcome. However, if you believe in God, then I guess, that power ranks higher to you than the limits of your physical being (or the physical laws that rule the universe). And having that belief, that anything is possible with the help and approval of God, might make you more confident, might make you strive for more beyond the limits of your mental capabilities.

4. I can imagine that meditation/prayer is quite calming and maybe can even train/improve our cognitive functions. I guess a lot of mindfulness techniques are variations of meditation techniques.

I guess, a lot of ADHDers struggled with focussing but a practical meditation technique that my mom has told me about is to neither focus on anything in particular, nor to try to empty your mind and focus on nothing (both of which are impossible for me). She said a form of meditation is to just watch your thoughts. Don't try to reject or suppress any thoughts but just observe them. Or observe your feelings. Without any judgement and without focussing on any objective. Just let yourself be.

I rarely do it but I can imagine that it could help (as a bonus it's non religious so some thing us atheists could do as well).

Even scientists have faith in the scientific method.

It is actually impossible to construct a coherent world view without basing it on one assumed "given". That one assumption in any person's life is effectively an article of faith.

The meditation your mother mentioned is called
"Settling The Mind In It's Natural State".
It is thought to be a difficult form of meditation except for people who have what in Tibetan Medicine is called a "Wind Constitution"- a restless mind with lots of ideas.

It is exceptionally well taught by Alan Wallace, of the Santa Barbara Institute for Consciousness Studies:
https://www.google.com.au/search?q=settling+the+mind+in+its+natural+state&ie=utf-8&oe=utf-8&aq=t&rls=org.mozilla:en-US:official&client=firefox-a

Abi
03-13-13, 03:33 AM
Moderator Note

There is no problem in allowing a some degree of latitude in this discussion however please be considerate of:

1. The Original Topic, which is Christianity-specific; and

2. The overall purpose of the M&S forum, outlined in my post on page 1 of this thread.

If another distinct spirituality-related topic comes to mind, which you wish to discuss in detail, please consider starting your own thread.

Carry on... :)

slouchpotato
03-28-13, 08:52 PM
To me, christianity is spiritual, I was brought up in a christian society, went to a christian school, so think in terms of christianinity, but my constant search for answers led me to self help books by top people, who explain the full quotes as is in the bible, not the edited versions I was taught in school or hear from others/media, taught me to have an open mind, which to me is spiritual.